618 thoughts on “Looking in Montana and Wyoming…

      • Dan-
        You mean “Treasure State” ?
        Maybe Forrest has connections at the Montana State capital :-)

        They used to read “Big Sky Country”…don’t know when they changed…
        If it was 2009 or 2010 I think we should look at Montana closer…

        • They read “The Treasure State” across the top thru the 50’s too. (they used to be stamped “Prison Made” back then, too). …and made of steel, so not a lot are left in any kind of good shape. http://img0.etsystatic.com/009/0/6720593/il_570xN.412386256_p390.jpg (<–this is a bike plate, but is from the right era)
          But in answer to your question, MT changed to the recent /current blue/white trim plate with "treasure state" printed across the top in exactly January of 2010.

          FYI ;)
          ( I found that connection interesting too!)

          • Montana actually has about 35 choices for license plates. We are still deemed the Treasure state…but we are bigsky country…Montana is spanish for mountain and the state flag says oro-y-plata, spanish for gold and silver….

    • I posted today, July 27, 2014 at 9:32 am on this site what I believe to be some helpful answers to clues which if followed will lead to the treasure in Colorado. Please check it out.

  1. Yellowstone was a favorite area of many, I thought too, but maybe a lot of people are changing their minds after looking at other clues and posts by Forrest and other people on this blog.I know some things have made a lot of sense to me and I’ve been looking in NM as well as CO.

  2. I enjoyed a nice vacation in Wyoming two weeks ago (Mar 8-15th) and there’s 4 to 8 foot of snow on the ground in Yellowstone and after a slight warmup to the low 30’s, it’s below zero again this week. I made the mistake of getting off my snowmobile for a look at a tree (only a stupid squirrel hole) and fell into a 6 foot sink hole of snow and slush that required help from others to get out. So no use looking until the weather turns and the snow melts. This year, the posted road openings are as follows below. This is for the main park roads only. The unpaved forest roads in and around Yellowstone are normally later as they can’t be plowed and must be completely free of snow to open. They estimate late May for anything over 7000 ft as the snow is still pretty deep. Keep in mind, even as the roads open, the wet slushy snow on the ground off the roads will make the hiking cold, wet and even muddy and so warm waterproof boots will be appreciated by your feet. (and bring bear spray, the bears are waking up and are very hungry.)

    Friday, April 26: West Yellowstone and Mammoth Hot Springs to Old Faithful
    Friday, May 3: Norris Junction to Canyon Junction; Canyon Junction to Fishing Bridge; and Fishing Bridge to East Entrance (Sylvan Pass)
    Friday, May 10: Fishing Bridge to Grant to South Entrance
    Friday, May 24: Tower Junction to Tower Fall; Cooke City to Chief Joseph Hwy.
    After May 24 (tentative): West Thumb Junction over Craig Pass to Old Faithful
    Early June: Tower Fall to Canyon Junction (Dunraven Pass)
    Friday, June 14: Beartooth Highway

    • This road opening schedule was based on normal operations. I just read the parks service needs to cut 22% of their budget because of the sequestering budget problem. If this holds, they think everything will slip 3 weeks to save 30K a day by not plowing.

  3. I was up there last Sunday. 6 foot wall of snow where I was planning on looking! And I even checked to make sure the area was open. Yeah…the main road was, but the main road blocked all side roads completely. Beautiful area, and I can’t wait to,go back when it melts! Maybe that’s why Forrest knows it hasn’t been found ;)

  4. The story about Forrest bathing in the Firehole river where the hot water enters is a interesting starting place.
    He mentions moving in the river to get to a cooler spot and how its a special place for him.
    But for the time being I have not tied the rest of the poem into that location like I have to another spot.
    But if my first spot fails I will revisit this spot.

    • Forrest said the the stories in the book aren’t clues but can help people to understand the clues. I’m starting to think that the story you are mentioning is how Forrest is describing where warm waters halt. Not necessarily the exact spot he’s talking about but it certainly could be suggesting that if you find the right hot springs that meet with a river below the home of brown you have located your starting point.

  5. I think it is in Wyoming, but not in yellowstone. I have tracked most of the rivers and springs trying to find a spot that fits that is not part of a National anything! So far nothing fits exactly…..

    • I agree Jen. I think it’s close, but not in the park. Mainly for the reason of laws, being allowed to take things out of the park. And Forrest is aware of that.
      The spot I’m headed to fits the poem word for word line by line…and I couldn’t contain my excitement…which is why I took the 6 hour drive with my hubby (I live in Utah)… And when we got there, the side road I needed was blocked by 6 ft of snow. I was able to take some awesome pictures though, and got to spend 12 hours alone driving with my husband…whom I rarely get any time with. So once that 6 ft wall melts…I’ll be headed straight back.
      I wonder how many of us will pas each other on the way or meet each other on the trails :)

      • I’m not so sure you should rule out Yellowstone. The park service wants you to believe that they own everything in the park but that’s not necessarily true. If you research it there are laws about abandoned property and treasure “trove” (non-buried treasure) that revert ownership back to the original owner. Note in the poem that FF has specifically referred to it as “Trove”.
        Think of it this way. If you dropped your wallet or purse with a million dollars in it in the woods it doesn’t automatically belong to the park service…it still belongs to you. This is what Forrest knows and what most folks are overlooking in the last two stanzas. Its trove (a legal definition for un-buried gold) and he’s giving up his ownership rights to the finder “give you title”.

        • I think it is in the park. He said he hopes no one will find it for a thousand years. The park is one of the few things that should still be undevloped because it is a national park.

          • Eric, Yellostone National Park is highly developed. Everything about the park beacons human interaction. If you have never been to the park you should go. It is sad when you get there and realize what all has happened in the name of making money. Roads, business, and ranger stations eeverywhere…some stuff you cant even go see anymore…it is not what the webpage sure makes it sound like

          • Assuming FF actually meant that his poem should last 1000 yrs, which I haven’t yet found any proof were his words (check for yourself: I dare you to find video of FF saying otherwise) , …it might be useful to keep in mind that BLM, Tribal land, NF lands etc are likely to retain their status for a good long time too. (However; Students of history will laugh at the idea that such political boundaries would , for sure, exist for a millennia though! )

          • That’s a good point about a national park. I’m seriously focused on a park and believe it is legal to take the trove out because it’s not indigenous to the area. The first line in the poem, I feel, refers to a place with borders. Anyway, good luck in the chase.

  6. Figure this is a good place to suggest people look up what the word Montana means….and I agree with the person who said that since there’s so much snow up there…that he would feel safe in knowing it’s still there.

  7. This just in from Forrest-
    Dal, I’m getting lots of email from people that say someone claims to have found the treasure. Can you assure them that 14 different men have made bogus claims to have found the treasure but no one has. f

    • Just because 14 men have falsely claimed finding the treasure, how can Forrest state with any certainty that no one has, unless he has been to the location to check?

      • I had just posted this in another thread….and it’s hearsay, but another searchers who’s been on the blogs a while had said he heard that Forrest had checked on it in the fall and I remember someone telling me that it was under snow. So my belief is that he knows that no one can see it at the moment with all the snow either in the higher elevation of NM…or, because it’s in the northern state areas that are under snow. Forrest has said to not pay attention to anything, but the poem or the book. So take what I’m saying with a grain of salt…It’s just my opinion on that. I have wondered if he has a chip in the chest that has a locator so that he knows it’s still there. He did say he thought of everything. Either that or there’s a web cam that points to where it is and he can see it from his computer. There are many web cams for places out West that are already set up by places. Maybe we can search those and see it from home lol.

          • Well, you can’t quite leave the tracking device behind if you don’t whether it exists, and where it is. It would likely be in a not so obvious place, just like so many of FF’s clues. The essential GPS items are quite tiny (not as big as a Garmin or similar device).

          • Best time…You can get there just about anytime. However in winter you can only get in the park via commercial, oversnow transportation. The snow lodge at Old Faithful is a pretty good place to stay while you’re there. But if you plan to walk around looking for a hidden chest outdoors…then you’ll need to wait for late spring. There’s a lot of snow there right now and usually is until May…
            The roads will be plowed and opened in April but the snow will still be deep off the roads..

            My favorite time to be there is late May..early June when the snow is gone and the vacationers have not yet arrived..But even then there are areas that are off limits for mating season…(give em some privacy)
            Once school is out the tourist trade gets heavy and stays that way til September when school starts again..
            I also like late summer…early fall..the park is really beautiful…

          • Dal, (or anyone) do you know ,,, can you still enter by foot in winter? And/or can you take a snow coach to the lodge and hoof it down from there by sled/snowshoe/ski?

          • I live in Montana not too far from Yellowstone…We had an amazing amount of snow fall in the park this year. I suggest that you visit the park in june or july. Its the best time of year! Later seasons are into fire season which may not be enjoyable. Old faithful is a neat attraction, there are dozens of gysers around the park though…have fun and be safe…

      • I thought about that, and then I figured out a way that FF may have used to find out when and whether the trove ever sees the light of day. He is, was, a fighter pilot way back when, so he’d be aware of navigation beacons and GPS. Except here he may have rigged together a GPS beacon with a type of light sensitive device (e.g. calculators that work without a battery, just using sun or any daylight source), … such that the device stays silent when it has not been found or opened, but that, as soon as the treasure chest is opened, the GPS gets activated, and he will know it has been found (in addition to knowing where it’s being moved). I think FF would be smart enough to rig this together, and really, would it not be goofy if someone just follows him around, finding the treasure, because FF has got to check if it’s still there . .

        Is that a smart enough idea?

  8. First, thanks to Forrest for the idea and adventure. Second, thanks Dal for your work on the Page. Third, I am in the camp for places north of Santa Fe(ie way north in the Yellowstone Park area). Can share my thoughts later, but am planning a trip now for July. Hopefully treasure still there. Thanks too, for those reports on the snow pack. Understand that a little below normal for the Natl Park ytd. Local businesses are pitching in to help with govt. budget issues to help open the roads on schedule. Good luck to all in “the Chase”.

  9. Even after the roads are plowed open there will still be six plus feet of snow on the level. Probably be second or third week of June before you can hike around good and maybe first of July for the lakes above 7000ft

  10. My son and I have plans to search a couple places around Yellowstone this summer Already have campground reservations. First time to visit for either of us and we are looking froward to it. If anyone has a place or two that you want us to take a look let me know.

      • No trouble this early. My experience has shown you better make campground reservations early. The campground is right near Hebgen Lake just outside the park. No doubt there will be others out looking as soon as the snow melts.

        • We went last year in May or June I think it was and it was hard finding a motel/hotel room and that was without many knowing about the search. I would recommend anyone that goes to the Hebgen Lake area….head over to the Longhorn Restaurant….ask if they know who Forrest is….they will…..The food is awesome.

  11. Hi Stephanie,
    Just curious if during your trip there last year if you had a sense whether many of the local year-round residents around the Hebgen Lake area(or even West Yellowstone, MT for that matter) have been out searching for the treasure. This to me seems the most likely general area where the treasure would be.Nowhere else really fits Mr. Fenn’s history as well. There are many forest service roads just east and south of the Lake, maybe up one of the side creeks(“Up a creek without a paddle”(ie walking), that could make a good hiding spot. I think the treasure has be within 500 feet of some kind of road, since Mr. Fenn has referenced that searchers have been this close(ie unknowingly driven by to/from looking). Will not require a long hike to remote location, in my view.
    Also, in May, was the Lake pretty well clear of ice/snow, as well as the surrounding forest(is area south of Lake)? I am showing the Lake at about 6,800 ft +/- elevation(lower than general YNP). Thanks in advance for any insight.
    Good luck to all in “the chase”. Fun stuff.

  12. I hope that I bring back “the treasure” LOL. If not, will be happy to share the local information. The waiting is the hard part now. Really feel good about a couple of spots, but rneed to be there in person and see the spots. For me, that will not happen until July. Had a couple days in early May, but think would just be too soon with snow and all. Live in NM so takes a few days extra just for travel.
    I know NM and CO geo very well and have hiked both areas extensively over the past many years. To me, the only area that makes sense is the YNP area within say a ~40-mile radius of Mammoth Hot Springs(not far but too far to walk-lol). Good luck to all in “the chase”.

  13. I’m surprised to see so few posts in this category. Do we have any serious hunters out there planning a trip to Wyoming here in the next month or so ? If so and they’re interested in the thought of teaming up with another individual i’d like to talk.

  14. I’m planning a visit, but I’m waiting for later in the year for nicer conditions. I tried late April/early May last year and learned the hard way that wet mud and slush is difficult to walk in. Every step is like 100 ft on dry ground. I have reservations for July 4th so I can gain access to my targets and not worry about the snow and wildlife restrictions.

    It’s been out there for 3 years and Forest thinks no one will find it anytime soon, so a few months won’t matter. Also, some of this area is closed for hiking until June 30 for bears and a new wolf pack that makes it’s home here. So make sure you can access your favorite spot before going.

    • When I said “here” – I meant the Lake Hebgen area. I have no idea what the restrictions are for the other parts of YNP. Most likely similar for he bears in other parts of the park.

  15. ironmeteor, ty for the info. My one and only place i am searching this year isn’t in the location you mentioned but hearing from experience can only help. I’m sure i’ll make several trips to my spot throughout the year as finances permit. Thousands of hrs of research and i can only come up with one place the poem makes sense. It paints a pretty picture.

  16. I’m just an amateur armchair treasure hunter. I am not looking for the treasure, nor do I intend to. However, this story fascinates me. I just want to share some ideas with those of you looking for the treasure. Agree, disagree, I’m just another voice in the chorus.
    To get right to the point, I don’t think the treasure is in Yellowstone Park (YP).
    I probably read that poem at least 500 times. At first, it was obvious that it referenced YP. Fenn spent a lot of time there and it is a special place to him. Also, so many of the clues in the poem are about YP and its features:
    Where warm waters halt – the Firehole River; home of brown –grizzly bears are also call brown bears or the predominant fish species in the Madison River is the brown trout; waters high – geysers; and so on. I read a blog where the guy solved all the clues by referencing a landslide, a lake formed by the landslide, a memorial rock with a plaque, etc. The only problem? The treasure box is apparently still undiscovered.
    This is why I don’t think the box is in YP.
    Fenn wants people to go out and look for the treasure. YP is fairly remote. It is at least a 2 day drive for 99% of the people who would look for it. Traveling to YP would be a major undertaking in time and expense (gas, food, lodging, etc.) just to look for the treasure.
    The government takes a very dim view of people who go to national parks, root around and dig up things. I don’t think Fenn would want to expose unsuspecting people to this liability. BTW, if you did find the box in YP and let this be known, the box and its contents would be confiscated as government property.
    Finally, some people assume that the box is buried or that it is hidden in water. Neither of these is likely.
    Fenn never said the box was buried. If it was, unless there was a very specific location or geologic feature (ie the volcanic rock in the Shawshank Redemption) you could be digging within a foot of the box location and not find it.
    I also don’t believe it is hidden in water. I don’t care how peaceful or small a stream is when you place the box in it, spring runoff or a storm would wash it away. I did this experiment. I took a shiny metal cookie tin, weighed it down with rocks, and placed it in about a foot of water in a creek near my home. I went back four weeks later to find it. At first, I thought it was gone. However, when I looked closer, it was there but it had grown moss and algae on it and looked just like the rest of the creek bed. And I knew exactly where it should have been. If the box is in a stream, good luck!

    Personally, I think the box is placed in a shallow cave or crevice on a ledge that can only be viewed from a certain angle or viewpoint. I read somewhere that Fenn at one time wanted his body to be placed by the box; that a flashlight would be helpful in the hunt; and that the box could possibly be affected by the elements or a fire. Hmmmmm….
    Just my ramblings. Good hunting , everyone.

    • Just a thought as you seem to have thought about it a lot…maybe you should consider hooking up with someone who will search for you that will split it if it’s found in your spot(I’d work a contract with them though). I’d hate to see you give someone a direct route to it only for you to not get it and someone who’s not figured it out to get it. Again..just my thoughts….as you have some good idea and logical ideas.

    • @skeptic, generally, I agree with you. I have a few reservations about YNP as a possibility simply because Fenn recalled how the family would pull into the forest and drop their camping gear in the open and return to find it the next year, intact. He knows where to go. But, the reality is that Mr. Fenn delivered the treasure to it’s final location alone. For him to drive from Santa Fe would have been an exhaustive trek that would have required several overnight stays. I don’t know him but I suspect that he no longer pilots his own plane and in no way could he board a commercial flight without raising the eyebrows of the government. In light of all of this, I suggest that the treasure is hidden within a half days drive of Santa Fe or approximately to the state line to the north… Durango and Trinidad, CO maybe and from Folsom, NM to Chaco Canyon. It’s certainly possible that we are all underestimating a man who has done many remarkable things in his life; in which case he is right – the treasure will not be found for a long, long time. I think it’s in NM.

      • Just want to say that he has access to fly wherever he wants and can drive great. He made mention in Dals blog about flying in his plane and getting a car at the airports. So if he did secret it up in YNP…all he would have to do is have someone fly him up there and get a car and go alone wherever he wants. I don’t think he would drive up there. I don’t think he’d fly commercial. He doesn’t need to. Those are just my opinions.

      • Stephanie, with all due respect. In order to refine the search I want to eliminate locations that are illogical. I think that is where skeptic40 was going with that post. Surely, Mr. Fenn flew his plane all over the country searching for new locations and rented cars when he landed. But that was decades ago. Chartering a plane to transport the treasure, while doable, would involve a minimum of one other party. Luggage is weighed and possibly loaded by another person. Try putting 42lbs of metal in a box, in a bag and pick it up. In a small bag it would be suspiciously too heavy for it’s size and in a large bag would be lopsided also making it suspicious. Someone would have noticed the strangely heavy bag. My point is, its not a question of would he drive or would he fly commercial – it’s my opinion that he couldn’t fly commercial and he would probably drive before involving another person in the transportation of 42lbs of gold. Just because he could fly doesn’t mean he did. I’m glad that you agree that he wouldn’t drive to Wyoming. I think it’s a fair argument to make that he drove the treasure to its location and was home for a late dinner. If you want to continue to look in YNP, I think it’s fine.

        • I’ve got places everywhere…so thinking I know where I’m going or that I’m not searching here or there would be a mistake. I just was only trying to clarify that he could easily take a plane. I believe he has family who flies that wouldn’t question what he was bringing on board. I just wanted people to realize that’s not a far fetched thought that he could do that was what my opinion was. Not disagreeing…..just wanted to pass on my thoughts on what you said.

      • Crazyfamily,

        If I were of the ilk that would put $1 to $3 million in a box, craft a very clever poem/map over some umpteen years, and then hide the treasure for anyone with the smarts/cajones to find, all the while striving for the goal of solidifying my legacy, and getting America’s collective butt off of the couch, I wouldn’t worry about the mileage it took to get it there. I think your theory of a half day drive, merely for Forrest’s convenience, is off track. I believe you phrased it as an “exhaustive trek, that would require several overnight stays” but if this was the way that Forrest chose to leave his mark on the world, would a little windshield time and some dried out 7-11 hotdogs be too high of a price to pay? I agree that to find the treasure you will need to eliminate locations that are illogical, but I don’t think that distance from Santa Fe is logical. I believe the entire Rocky Mountain Range is fair game. However, since I am focusing on Colorado for myriad reasons…I approve of your choice of New Mexico…have at it!!

    • Skeptic I totally concur with all of your thoughts! Cool experiment! I also agree with Steph, have someone find it for ou if you can’t but make sure its contractual, you have put a ton of thought into this!!

    • Well here I am a year later and I could not agree with you more about YP. Remember, he said that subtle clues were sprinkled throughout the stories in TTOTC yet YP is too obvious. My best theory puts me looking in Montana streams. Your cookie tin experiment was a good idea and you’re right about the moss and algae; I’ve seen a lot on the submerged rocks and whatever.
      On the other hand F could have hid it in a national park. Finn’s chest is not indigenous to any park which means that it can be taken out and the poem clearly gives the finder title to it. If we’re not allowed to take anything out of national parks then they would not have a lost and found department.
      I have not given a lot of thought on how F traveled to the hiding spot but due to the fact that he was alone, there is only a couple of possibilities; he drove or flew and then drove. If he flew I think he flew himself because flying commercially with the chest could have raised some flags getting through the TSA. If I was to do what he did, I would drive, even if it was a long one.
      Thanks for the post and good luck.

      • Ok, so I thought I would drop a little clue. You were thinking bout driving due to the TSA. Here in Montana we have airfields that small cesnas can land on…its not a fromal airport at all..and there are three near the west side of the park. He could have flown landed there and never seen an airport…..Also I was certain that FF said the box was not submerged!! Great post and keep on keepin on!! I wonder if FF is going to release stickers so he knows who is out and about looking???!!!????

        • When did F say it was not submerged? Knowing for sure would help a lot. From your post you mention that you’re in Montana; I’m in Missoula.

          • I cant recall where I saw that he said it was not under water. I think Dal might have a clue…I have been so busy this summer mining that I have just restarted my research into the treasure…I thought I should add. He likely hid the treasure before TSA even existed….with that being said I am also a miner that has traveled to various parts of the country to dig gemstone. I have take hundreds of pounds of equipment with me….trust me it does not make them bat an eye as to weight….it is objects that go through the scanner. Lastly why would FF fly commercial when he has his own plane?? You guys must also realize YP is a fraction of Montana…this is a massive state and you could spend 1000 years easily looking and never find it….

          • I am pretty sure that if the TC went through the TSA scanner it would peak someone’s interest. What a lucky TSA agent to pull Mr Fenn aside and open up the chest to see what’s inside…. Imagine the look on their face when he says. “Yeah, I’m going to go hide this chest in the Forest…. and anyone can go and find it using a poem I wrote…:)”

  17. We are in Montana this evening and exploring YNP/surrounding area over the next few days. Today had a bit of snow early, but roads are clear. West entrance if closed, of course. Does anyone know where the Today Show was searching today? The spot will air tomorrow morning, correct?

  18. Seems like I remember reading a source(do not have link, from other Blog, I think) that reported that Forrest and his wife had taken an extensive road trip from Santa Fe up through CO, WY, MT and back. Think this blogger had interviewed family friends who confirmed this(sometime in 2009/2010, or so). Really not that bad of drive(mostly interstate I25/I80, then Hwy191N). Take a couple of days, some donuts, and you’re there. Once near, sure wife sat in the car or hotel while Forrest made his venture alone(As I have gone alone in there). Think why Forrest is so sure that searchers have been within 500′ of treasure is because highway or forrest road goes by “spot” within this margin(probably out of site).

    I view Forrest’s leaving of the treasure almost like spreading ashes(his own really in this case). Would really choose a place with DEEP meaning for him. Have not read or heard anthing in his Memoirs or interviews that would support CO, UT, or NM. While I am sure he enjoys Santa Fe and areas of northern NM, do not see this as a viable area. Plus, I know this area of NM pretty well, and I cannot find a “fit” anywhere with the clues.
    Probably will be proven wrong, though(someone will announce next week that they located it in Jemez Springs area, Chaco, or Browns Canyon/Poncha Springs CO). Ha. Thanks again Dal for nice work on the Page.
    Good luck to all in “the Chase”.

  19. My New Mexico folder is empty. I haven’t exhausted much effort in finding it there. Now my Co/Wy folders on the other hand are flowing over. Have to just sit back and smile at the ppl who have limited knowledge of who this man really is. Business trips would be the perfect cover especially if his special place is within a couple hrs of the business being conducted. Flying right over the box, punching his password in and knowing it’s still in the same spot he stashed it sounds perfect!

  20. Chris,
    Just curious if you were able to get by Gardner, MT area. Any heavy ice on the Yellowstone River?
    Looks like its been pretty snowy/cold up there. All my dd leads me to an area within ~50 miles of Mammoth Hot Springs WY. I feel about 80% confident in this. Just my thoughts, though. Waiting now for trip up there in July. Will continue to study and “listen good”. Anyone looking between now and then, do not look too closely. Ha.
    The agony now is in the waiting to get out in the field. Ughh.(Forrest, is it too late to take the treasure back and “re-stash” it in say the Superstition Mtns. of southern AZ? lol)

    Good luck to all in “the Chase”.
    P.S. Will still enjoy getting outside in the next few months to enjoy nature’s beauty of northern NM and southern UT(maybe Grand Canyon AZ), just not Forrest’s Treasure for now.

    • Hi OldYeller-
      The ice is off the Yellowstone River. We have 42 acres outside of Gardiner. If you get up here, drop me a line. This week we put in a new septic field, and talked about the treasure. Alex

    • Old Yeller, did you search near Gardner? Any luck? We went there in July. I was SURE the treasure was there. But it wasn’t. I’m interested if you were looking in the same area we were.

  21. Stephanie,fyi from ny regarding ff flying, as a fellow pilot i sent an email to ff abkut a month ago from my son whos 4thgoing grade class is following the clues/story, asked him if he flew on an airplane at any time to hide the treasure and he said he did not fly on an airplane… we do not k ow enough about the rockies and i assume evebtually a park rangeror a local will find the treasure, it would not be financially reaponsible for me to take off of work pay for airfare, hotal ect but when i saw the discussion about ff flying or not thought i should share what ff shared with my son. I cannot keep up with all these blogs so please do
    nt take it personally if u reply and i do not see it…

    • I’ve never heard him say that…so I want to confirm if it was said or not. No offense, but I’ve been told something about a child can just go to it and I’ve had Forrest specifically email me to say that was wrong information, that is not something he said. I know there are some out there who have had an interest in saying things to get people not going to certain areas, because they are going to search them and don’t want others to. I’m not saying, that’s the case…but I hope you can understand it’s been happening and I’d want to make sure.

      • Sorry for all the typos, makes me sound horrible, I texted it from my phone… was just trying to help. Is there a way I can forward you ff email? Like I said not really sure how these blogs work, used to standard email, no tweeting or facebook for me.

      • Still waiting for him to email me…but Forrest replied to me and said this which is good knowledge for any rumors. Lots of people are saying lots of things with little or no knowledge of the facts and no way for them to find out.

      • I got the email from bslenz and this is what Forrest said to him originally…. “If you will invite me to a BBQ sometime I will tell you that I did not have to fly on an airplane to hide the treasure.” I asked if Forrest would clarify for all of us and this is what he answered.

        “I told him that I did not have to fly on an airplane to hide the treasure but did not tell him that I did not.” So that’s that…Forrest does typically say things in double speak(his own special language)….but I also heard that he drove to Yellowstone and Wyoming around when it was hid(not from Forrest…so don’t take it as fact). He is on the board of directors up at the Buffalo Bill Museum though in Wyoming and that’s right by Yellowstone so to me, that’s pretty probable. Maybe someone can find out how often they meet for board meetings…I’d be curious.

      • Thank you!
        I’d love to have F over for a BBQ my daughter would love his stories! She’s adventurous! Her name is Cheyenne and she lives up to her name! “Free spirit” she will be the girl version of F one day I think! :-)

  22. I’m going to be heading that way from Illinois soon, have an almost exact location in mind. The things I’m not sure of are the animals there, what to do if you come across a bear etc…

    • research what to do about animals online. I met a black bear and he knew I was coming, because I was singing(on purpose in case something was around). We both went in opposite directions. I haven’t heard this mentioned, but I always bring a whistle among other things….but that’s such a simple thing to have around your neck on a string. I’ve walked back in the woods just blowing short little bursts into the whistle as I walk. I carry a rock I find on the ground. I won’t get into the bubble wrap clothing I wear…guessing you wouldn’t do that lol…but research online…call the local ranger station where your going to ask for resources to learn about their area.

      • Thanks for the info Stephanie! I enjoy looking at your blog too. I’m quadruple checking everything before I go as it’s 1200 miles and probably 6 days away from home and work. I’m self employed, 50 years old and a father of children 5, 7 and 10 yr old boys so decisions like going away are very carefully made.

    • Pepper Spray will stop a Grizzly bear, when a gun won’t. You can buy some in Gardiner, but it costs about $55 at the store. I’d get it at a large sports store.

  23. Thanks Alex for the update. Hope you won’t make me camp in the new septic field. lol.
    Seriously, sounds like a nice “spread”. In addition to the Treasure, love the area up there.
    In regards to the animal questions, I hike with bells on the pack(the animals hear you long before they see you), also carry what I call “bear mace”(really cayenne pepper), just in case I come upon a deaf Grizzly. Canisters of “mace” cost about $40 and last a few years. Would work with un-leased dogs, bears, moose, jealous husbands, just about anything. Good backup, just in case.
    Good luck in “the Chase”.

  24. I was just curious on the feel serious searchers get once they’re there and if weather in April would permit searching.

    • Dazed–
      If you are considering looking in the Yellowstone park–the south entrance will most likely not even be open/plowed before May 3rd. Not sure what the plowing situation for the north entrance will be due to budget cuts. Regardless–way too much snow in April for any trails to really be hiked!

  25. With the last clue referrencing “..no structures associated with treasure”, blows my whole Buffalo Bill Reservoir and Hebgen Lake(Dam) motifs all to hell. Thought these were looking pretty solid, but not now. Still have a couple places in Yellowstone NP (no controls there, tg). Going back south, too, into Colorado with my backup area. No dams/reservoirs on the Arkansas headwaters down through Brown’s Canyon. Couple ideas here.
    Happy Easter and Good luck to all in” the Chase”.

  26. I can not afford the trip or take time off work, but, maybe these little insights I have came up with in my wandering mind may be of help to somebody actively hunting for this elusive treasure.
    In FF’s blog, Concy and me, FF mentions….
    “When I was a young teenager, one of my favorite places to fish in Yellowstone Park was Grebe Lake. According to a map of Yellowstone’s Grebe Lake, to the West is the beiginning of a Trail Head that takes you to Ice Lake then Wolf Lake then Grebe Lake. Once at Grebe Lake and you follow the Grebe Lake Trail South, it ends at Norris Canyon Road. FF also mentions…..
    “The trail was actually a narrow sandy road that was blocked by a locked gate. It was an easy three mile walk from the gate to the lake, even carrying enough gear to stay a couple of nights.” (I believe this Grebe Lake Trail from Canyon Road where he used to fish with his Father and Football Coach is a BIG clue. And FF goes on to say….
    “Concy Wood, my high school football coach, frequently went to Yellowstone with us. One day he expressed the desire to fish Grebe Lake one last time. His legs were not good enough to make the walk and he suffered from the early stages of Parkinson’s disease, although we didn’t know it at the time.”
    That is as far as I have got before my brain went numb. LOL, but to summarize in my opinion……

    Ice Lake – Begin it where warm waters halt (Not a warm spring or geiser, but, when warm water halts it turns to ice.)
    Grebe Lake Trail South – And take it in the canyon down, as well as, Not far, but too far to walk. (Take the Grebe Lake trail down to Norris Canyon Road. Not far, but too far to walk. (Assuming he is referring to the trail Concy Wood could not walk in his blog.)
    the home of Brown. I believe FF is referring to Brown trout as it has been noted the treasure is not associated with any structure and they were going there to fish.
    As far as heavy loads and water high, Topography shows that if you were to Walk the Grebe Lake Trail North from Norris Canyon Road, you would be carrying “Heavy Loads of gear, and walking uphill to Grebe Lake. “Water High.”
    Gibbon River flows into Grebe Lake and I assume there are many branches of creeks fingering off of the river that are too shallow to use a paddle via canoe or Kayak. “There’ll be no paddle up your creek,” Possibly referring that the sandy Grebe Lake Trail is an old dried up creek bed. Which could also mean when warm water halts. I am probably confusing my readers so…….

    Anyway, If I am correct, I believe this puts you VERY close to the treasure. If I could make the trip, I would start from Norris Canyon Road and walk The Grebe Lake Trail North looking for any Trail Blaze signs or markings that could represent a Blaze. Any caves or crevices that you can imagine an elderly man able to access. If I found something that I thought to be a blaze, I would look directly beneath it.

    If somebody is in that area and follows this post, Please let me know what you find as I can only dream. I am a Park Ranger in Pennsylvania and if the treasure is not there, I bet you will walk away with a treasure in your mind from the beauty and awe of such a wonderful place. Again, I can only dream, but if I am right, I helped change somebody’s life and that gives me a great satisfaction. If it is special to FF, then most definitely it is worth a look!

    HAPPY HUNTING!!

    • Randy, I think you have it right. This is one of several options I have. Reading his book, it has to be there where he spent so many memorable summers. Fishing at Grebe Lake was important to him. We will travel there this month and will post after we get back unless you see us on the morning news!

  27. So you think it is somewhere in the area that he took Concy? He says he never went back to that spot, but maybe somewhere close to it……

  28. Randy it’s people like you that makes this a wonderful journey. If i had no intentions of going out to the spot i have chosen i’d give someone special a detailed map/reason why i think it’s there somewhere. BTW it isn’t far from where you just mentioned. It took 3 months of research devoted to what the home of Brown was. I have yet to see anyone mention my home of Brown. June is marked on my calendar.

  29. Wrong,wrong and more wrong. There are no Brown trout in this area only Yellowstone Cutthroat and Grayling. You have to go down river (below Yellowstone Falls) to find Brown trout along with Rainbows, Cutthroat, and Rocky Mountain Whitefish. The Gibbon River does not flow out of or into Grebe Lake, it meets up with the Firehole at Madison Junction and forms the Madison River.

    D&C: As far as anyone mentioning “your home of Brown” It’s probably because no one wants to talk about it, but a lot of people know or believe they know and want to keep it to themselves until they can investigate it on there own, and you are right it isn’t far away. If were going to grab for clues maybe Concy Wood has something to do with “in the wood”

    • I don’t think I realized that was his last name…not sure if it said on the blog. Does anyone know of types of rocks that might be called Brown something or other? Just curious.

    • Wishmeluck, I can agree that I am possibly wrong. Just tossing out tidbits of information that I think make sense to me. The map I was looking at was pretty basic and showed only Gibbon River. If there are no Brown trout there then I am most likely wrong. Didn’t FF also mention a bridge and heavy loads? I think I read that somewhere. The map did show a fishing bridge south of Canyon Village. And I can grab another possible clue from heavy loads and high water. Fly fisherman will use heavy loads in fast moving or deep water to get the fly down to the fish. Thanks for your insight as well :)

      • To my knowledge FF never mentioned a bridge but I think some people have mentioned that “heavy loads” could be associated with bridges, but it could be associated with a few other things too, like power lines, dams and ????

        Can Dal or Stefi verify whether Forrest ever made the bridge remark?

      • Wow that makes the most sense of heavy loads and water high I’ve heard to this point. To me its always been a water fall. So its nice to have another option.
        TY Randy

  30. I have to correct myself. The Gibbon River source is Grebe and Wolf Lake and there are Rainbow trout in it along with Grayling.

  31. Wishmeluck it seems to me as if you’ve done your homework. The feeling of excitement fills me once again i just hope i don’t find 10 more exciting places before June. I have a budget of no more than $3,000 it goes fast once your on the road.

  32. My site in NM turned out all wrong for many reasons.Seemed to fit,but probably just me reading more into it than what was really there.Anyways,I am now focusing all my energy on my original site in the Yellowstone area.Seems more likely for f to go back to his roots.There will be a lot of us searchers here when things really start to thaw out.Happy hunting all!

  33. I also think the treasure could be near Yellowstone. I found a cave in Backtail Canyon Yellowstone Park – and married my wife there – 28 years ago. You might think these places would be known, but they’re not. There are lots of hidden areas, not to mention Indian artifacts around Yellowstone. I’ve even seen Wikiups still standing in the forests of Yellowstone.There are pictographs, drive lines, tipi rings all still easy to see. No telling what Forrest found years ago, but “my cave” is still undiscovered. We now live near the northern border of Yellowstone.
    Don’t miss the Boiling River as a place to soak after your searching. 2 miles inside the Park northern entrance. Forrest used it too. Drunks, elk and bison on the road are more dangerous than bears. Luck to all!

    • After a few visits I realized Yellowstone is massive. It’s not like Yosemite and over run with tourists everywhere. There are places in Yellowstone that never get visitors. Places in the NW corner, Eastern canyons and NE mountains that haven’t seen but a few souls since the original Crow and Blackfoot walked the area. It’s such an amazing place and just so huge,

  34. I can only dream of going out to look for this great adventure as I am so far away, here in Maine, but I have only just gotten into this Chase and was thinking I saw something written about trains or a railroad. Maybe my eyes are only playing games after reading so many comments. Im hooked for sure. The part of the poem that mentions “Just heavy loads and water high”…is there anyone else that has thought it might reference heavy loads on a train and water towers being water high?? Are there any train rails in that area of West Yellowstone that anyone knows of. I hope the one(s) that finds it will certainly leave a piece of the treasure behind for others to continue the dream. I also had a thought about the line, “From there its no place for the meek”. I will continue researching this first. What an awesome thing for Mr. Fenn to create. If I could afford the book Im sure I would find more clues to solve this wonderful treasure hunt…Or at least have an incredible read to share with my family. Have fun everyone.

    • Our first search had to do with exactly that…they have some very special train lines out there and I thought the different parts of the poem had to do with the different stops you make along a train route. It also was the train that was using in the movie Indiana Jones. We didn’t find it though. I also thought that tarry scant which means wait a while had to do with the train waiting a while to be filled from the water high(towers).

      • Stephanie – I know of a rail station where the train stops for ten minutes and ten minutes only. Miss it, an you have to wait until the next day (Tarry Scant). It passes right through the search area of some of those on this blog, as well as some on chasechat.

    • Yes, I thought of that, and that warm waters could be the water in the steam engine. So where warm waters halt would be a train depot. I followed the narrow gage from Durango to Silverton on Google earth and didn’t find anything that really matched the other clues, but your thoughts are not unique! Keep thinking!

  35. To me the “tarry scant” means just the opposite- to linger shortly. In other words, don’t dink around staring at the treasure, just take it and go. Also, in the previous line it asks the searcher to “look quickly”. Why so much urgency in these two key lines? Maybe the search takes one to the middle of a roadway with cars coming, traintrack, ? Maybe a rabid squirrel ready to trounce? LOL I struggle the most with these two lines as to why so much urgency of time once the treasure is located. The remaining poem lines and clues, I find pretty straight forward and have a couple places in mind already. Mmm?

  36. One thing that has me confused is “As I have gone alone in there”. Does this mean he went in there to hide his treasure and it is still hidden “in there”, or did he go in there then come back out and hid it outside of there. If he went in there and hid it, then it could be in a cave, a mine shaft, a deep canyon, a National Park, State Park, a well etc. It had to be a trumatic experience for him to write “he went in there” vs just hiding it off the road somewhere. Also “in there” there must be some kind of history of riches new and old like an old mine, logging, gold propecting, vs say tourism or a new mining area. If “In there” is where it is then all the other clues could be “outside of there” and lead to “in there”

    • I’m jumping on the MontanaWyoming bandwagon. I’m starting to think his “treasures” where things he had as a young boy that he took with him on his family trips to West Yellowstone. Maybe a few items he always kept in his pocket. A favorite marble or an old spent rifle cartridge perhaps.

      “Treasures” are different (irreplaceable) from “riches” and much more valuable. If I recall the old “Dennis the Menace” always had a handful of treasures in his pocket. A young Forrest would be the same type of boy.

      Who knows… maybe he even hid some items when he was young and he’s put his new “riches” in the same place, thus “new and old”. This might even be part of the surprise when opening the chest.

      I’m still waiting on my book, but hope to get some insight to this. At least I know he didn’t take a certain ball of string.

      jd

  37. old,new,Brown .meek,wood ..The color of the Bible was made from the color of wood all those words are associated with the Bible

  38. Front cover of his book are 4 pictures turn the book upside down can you see the representing states ..His photo angled to represent Eastern Idaho Idaho, Then the gold photo represents Montana then Wyoming which overlaps Utah..The Gold is in Montana..

  39. Hey you Montana and Wyoming folk! Hope all of you are doing well in your neck of the woods. Just thought I’d drop in and say hello and share this with you all. I have many hot spots North of Santa Fe to search through and one of them is the Yellowstone Area and I will share with you all as to why the Yellowstone Area is just one of my areas to search through.

    Y= 25
    E = 5
    L = 12
    L = 12
    O = 15
    w = 23
    S = 19
    T = 20
    O = 15
    N = 14
    E = 5

    When the letters in Yellowstone are added up it gives us 165 and I personally found it interesting that Forrest Fenn’s Poem contains 166 words. That is awfully close…off by only 1 digit!

    I asked myself could that 1 digit missing be the letter A which will stand for “Area”? I also asked myself…or could that letter A stand for America and 1st…as in Yellowstone is “Americas 1st National Park”?

    I found this interesting and it’s why I made Yellowstone one of my locations to search this summer along with many other locations as Forrest Fenn’s Poem is so awesome that it describes so many other places even outside of Yellowstone.

    Just for humor…the F’s in (F)orrest (F)enn gives us 66 and like I said there are 166 words in Forrest Fenn’s Poem. Could that missing 1 be the letter A which could stand for (A)ir Force or (A)rchaeologist or (A)rchaeology to make it 166 as well to match up to the 166 words within the Poem?

    I find Forrest Fenn’s Poem fun and if I’m not mistaken his intentions were to make this whole Thrill of the Chase fun.

    Though I’d share this with you all. I personally found it fun and interesting that’s all.

    • You might have something there..I think Mr Fenn is very intelligent.he’s giving the proceeds he earns from his book to help cancer patients I think that in itself is a treasure he’s a wonderful and caring man..I think the treasure is in Montana.I lived outside with a garret detector all my life and I can understand how he can love and enjoy the outdoors as much as I do or anyone else.You never know what you will find on a treasure hunt ,a treasure can be a ring or a fortune and I guarantee you your being tested by one of best in the field and that’s Mr Fenn…Happy Hunting..

      • His collection tells you he loves the outdoors the peoples works,the art,history as well as the ancients.Quite an adventure there’s alot of past and present in his poem.

  40. Does anyone have a copy of National Geographic TOPO! state map software for Montana that they would be willing to part with? It’s recently gone out of business and you can’t get them any more. Let me know if you’ve got one and we can swap emails.

  41. @ironmeteor

    I sent you an email a couple weeks ago. I have a question about one of your previous post. I will send you another one today.

  42. Blog from @thedaillybeast(sorry not good with rounting) references road trip by Mr./Mrs Fenn in 2009/2010 to Wyo and Mt. If this really happened, then treasure most likely in one of these two States; if not then most likely in NM. This is key.
    Can anyone confirm this alledged trip? Good luck!
    Me, I am waiting for snow to melt and have trip planned to WYO in July.

  43. Even if he did take one, which I could believe, there are many states between Wy/Mon. Namely Colorado and Utah. So a road trip would only mean he could take it anywhere in the Rockies, including northern NM or even Idaho.

      • I was only stating that if he did the road trip to Wyoming, he also has to pass though Colorado or Utah. Utah is a possibility because it’s an Indian ruin heaven and a great spot to hunt for the last 30 years.
        Colorado is close to Santa Fe, NM, and previously on those long trips to YNP, at 35mph, he would have stayed many nights in Colorado and know it well. (do the math on that at 35mph, they traveled 250-300 miles per day at max in that old car). So a road trip in 2009/2010 doesn’t nail it down to any place in the Rockies.

        • I wonder if someone knows where his cabin is…and we already have his childhood address…where exactly the middle would be. Does anyone know where the cabin was EXACTLY? I know Dal said it was moved or something.

          • Stephanie-
            Do you mean where his parents motor court was at?
            Yes, we know the exact location.

            I was just taken to the location of the Fennhaven Motor court by a relative of Forrest’s. Many of the cabins do still exist. It appears that folks live in them now. They are no longer owned by the Fenn family.

          • motor court? Is that where the cabins in his memoir were? It shows his and also a family one? I think they are different. I’m thinking the original location when he was there.

          • Stephanie-
            Yes…one and the same. Remember that before there were cabins the family camped at Fishing Bridge. Then they bought a chunk of land in West Yellowstone. They camped there for several years and then started building cabins, dug a well and basically made improvements to the place. I am not certain how many cabins there were by 1950 but the place was called, I believe, Fennhaven Motor Court. I have a pic of it somewhere. I’ll post it when I find it.

            I think Forrest’s new book will shed some light on those years.

          • Stephanie, I have an idea about this cabin. Is there a way to communicate privately? I don’t know how to do that on this site.

  44. Hiking trails include 1400 miles of moderate to strenuous hikes that follow huckleberry laden hills to breathtaking views of the Cabinet peaks. <<<And has FF ever said, "I'm your Huckleberry!" lol lol

  45. Hi Dal
    I am new to this blog and I think you are the most knowledgeable veteran. I have a question for you: Did Mr. Fenn ever mention wildlife as a potential danger besides mudslide, fire, flood? Thanks very much for your time to help others to have the thrill of the chase
    Duc

    • Duc-
      I think your assessment of my knowledge is just about perfect. Could you please send that note over to my boss?
      Wildlife-
      In a joking tone he has mentioned bears and rattlesnakes. He has mentioned chipmunks and squirrels as something he wants us all to sit down and watch…
      I can’t think of any others…anyone else here care to elaborate?

      • Well actually dal, I’ve already mentioned to Steph our snake species. LOL If I catch her on again I feel I should warn her about our Mountain lion problem also. They always hunt in pairs you know. While you’re looking at one, the other is sneaking up from behind. Yea, kinda like those velosoraptors on Jurrasic Park. Hi Steph !!! LOL

  46. The only real dangerous wildlife is the grizzlies. Black bears or felines are sort of elusive. You might get cellulitis if bitten by chipmunks or squirrels. Bats can give you rabies. So if he did mention about bears, why dont many people go and search in Wyoming and Montana where he grew fond of. Just remember that mesmerizing childhood means a lot to us, especially Mr. Fenn. Good luck to everyone!

  47. I’ve read the book. Then re-read it a couple more times. Studied the poem, clues, and blog notes. I am now at the point that I am about 90% confident that the treasure is north of Lander, WY and west of Cody, WY. To me, no sense in looking in NM, CO, or UT. I think Mr. Fenn would place the treasure where his heart leads him the most. I see nothing in the book or poem that can lead anywhere else but WY or MT. That is where I am heading when the snows clear. The treasure will be located north of where the tumbleweed blows.
    I think someone will find the treasure within the next two years in time for Mr. Fenn to enjoy the moment. Good luck all.
    PS thanks again to Dal for the nice blog(Stephanie and some of the other “regulars”, too, for their input). Oh yes, and Mr. Fenn, if you are reading, for the adventure of “the Chase”.

    • I posted today, July 27, 2014 at 9:32 am on this site what I believe to be some helpful answers to clues which if followed will lead to the treasure in Colorado. Please check it out.

  48. OK, really in quiet time here. Maybe just nobody looking in WY or MT. So, I’ll respond to myself.
    Hey self, I think the treasure has to be in Wyoming or Montana. Why? Because that is the area that means the most to Mr. Fenn and he took a road trip up there just prior to writing the book and poem. Plus, the clues in poem fit this area so much better. I have a clear place to start looking. Just waiting for snow to melt. And, waiting. Ha!
    While the scenery is great in NM, CO and UT, the treasure is not there. I think I really understand Mr. Fenn and his life and I do not see anything that would lead to anywhere but WY and MT. Probably sharing too much, but I would like to see someone find(hopefully me). Good luck all.
    Mr. Fenn, if you are following, would appreciate a nice pre-summer substantial clue. It would be great to have someone find with you there to experience. Thanks for “the chase”.

    • Hi Self…good luck ;-) My favorite thing about Montana is that it means mountains….oh and I think we all like to reminisce about our childhoods most of all….oh and he says if he was young, he’d go back and get it. I guess I can go on and on. Wish I could make a trip there as soon as the snow melts…it was so beautiful up there. Make sure to have a meal at the Longhorn Saloon…he has family there and the food is GREAT

    • Hi self lol! I agree not a lot of activity in here but maybe that’s because the WY MT searchers are keeping all their thoughts to themselves! IDK!

      j ~ PFW

    • Tumbleweed,
      I’m with you in fixing in on Montana/Wyoming. There a spot there that is beckoning me like a lighthouse in the fog. Just wish I could go there today but will have to wait until next month. Good luck to you.

  49. Raven and ALL,
    I have the same “lighthouse” spot. We’ll probably all show up at the same spot together. LOL!
    OK by me. I’ll share. I just enjoy the chase, the puzzle, and the adventure. Keep a few things for the wife and grandkids, probably spend the rest, and end up just right back where I started; pretty much broke , pretty much happy, and in pretty good health(for an old guy). A hamburger and cold beer at the Longhorn Saloon after a full/”tired” day of searching might just be the best damn part of all. Thanks Stephanie for the lead. Good chasing!

  50. I previously posted as JD but someone else has posted under that name… and not very nice posts, in thread 18, so I am now posting as JDH. I missed all of 17 and 18 while I was searching. Still haven’t read them all yet. Anyway…

    I’ve returned from my first search and thought I’d share the experience.

    Wyoming is my area of concentration and “the chase” is the cause of my first visit there. I had 3 areas to search with my prime area zeroed down to the actual blaze to look quickly down at. I didn’t realize how much private land surrounded my blaze, but it turned out every road on the map led to a gate, most open, but eventually a closed one. None of them took me all the way to my blaze. It was frustrating, to say the least. After a day of this and I don’t know how many miles down different roads, from all directions, I decided to be brave. The next day I parked the car at the furthest point I could drive and with bear spray at my side and my bear bell jingling off the back of my pack, I hiked the last 5 miles. The hike was hot, windy and lonely. Not another soul in sight (just what I hoped for!). My spot was unknown as my “out of the box” solution seemed to be paying off so far.

    After 3 miles I ran into another closed gate. I was past the halfway point according to my gps .and although I knew Mr. Fenn didn’t take this route to hide the chest, I would end up at the same location that he could have driven to (according to the map and some personal connections which I felt were possible) so crawling under the gate was the practical thing to do… no problem. After another mile was another closed gait… and another crawl under it. The last mile brought questions to mind like “what the heck am I doing out here?” But it was too late to turn back without seeing the blaze. Just over the last ridge I began to see signs of ownership… a house, a truck, some other buildings. Darn!!! What do I do now? I’m within a quarter mile of my blaze. I have to cross this property to get to it. Will they let me?

    I continue my long walk up to the house to ask for permission. I don ‘t see anyone around to talk to so my only choice is to knock on the door and hope for the best. I knock once, twice, while rehearsing my speech in my mind. Do I mention Mr. Fenn and a treasure? Do I ask just to go see my blaze? What are the magic words (besides Please…) that will convince them to allow me to do it.

    No one answers… no one is home. Wonderful! I can go. No, Terrible!! What if they come home while I’m wandering about their property? These people have strong second amendment rights beliefs. How far do I stretch my luck? Brave or stupid.. I begin to look for my blaze. I spot it and move to get a closer look. Nothing there, darn! I look all around it, high and low, in every crevice. I move every rock and bush… nothing. I photo it for posterity and leave while the leavin’s good.

    I get under the first gate back, about a half mile down the road and I begin to think that perhaps the chest was sitting just an inch below the surface. I didn’t really probe the ground… just the surface. I start to think that I have come such a long way to leave without thoroughly… and to my own satisfaction, searching every possibility. I needed to go back and with my knife, verify that it’s not sitting in a hole just an inch or so below the surface at the base of my blaze.

    So back under the gate, down the road and straight to the spot. I quickly jab my knife into the ground all around the base. It goes down an inch in some areas, two or three in others, must be rocks. There no consistency to the depth, so no box here. I’m satisfied and get up to move on. But hey, what’s that over there? It’s some kind of marker. If I stand directly in front of my blaze, this marker is directly behind it about 50 feet away. Look quickly down??? perhaps, let’s check it out.

    It’s a post, cemented into the ground, with some writing on it and an X at the top. My heart beats a little faster. But oh, it looks like a date, written in the cement with a stick or something. Oh, it’s dated too early to have anything to do with the chest. Let’s get out of here.

    I start back up the hill and am grateful for my experience. I can say I found my blaze!! Then the sounds of motors break my joyful quiet. I turn and see what must be the owners arriving. A pickup truck and an ATV are moving toward the house from the back entrance. I keep walking, not wanting to delay my departure but fully expecting the ATV to come screaming up behind me any second. No one comes. Surely they saw me… I was in clear sight, within their peripheral vision.
    I made it over the ridge and out of sight, then under the gate and now on someone else’s property… someone not driving an ATV hopefully. Perhaps my luck will hold.

    I find two souvenirs on the trail back. One a horseshoe that may be from the 1800’s with two bent nails still in it (I’ll have it checked out) and the other a spent rifle cartridge that I’ll keep as a reminder of my possible stupidity. I make it back to my car while a thunderstorm roars in the distance but before the rain starts to pound me. I’m slightly wet, very tired due to the extra mile added to my 10 mile hike in the heat but with the biggest smile on my face. Not because I found the treasure, but because I have a photo of my blaze!

    I used my own out of the box solution, that I still believe is spot-on according to the poem, went to the blaze and found only… the thrill of the chase.

    It could have been better, but it was darn good just the same. Thanks Mr. Fenn!

    jdh

    P.S. I’d prefer not to show the photos, if you know what I mean.
    You know, I never tried to push that marker to the side to see if it would move. I wonder… nah!!!! Better not press my luck.

      • jen,

        thanks,

        Confidence will do that. I’m still very surprised it wasn’t there. I just can’t see where my solution is wrong. And it may not be wrong. It’s just not the right solution.

        jdh

        •  There are many many good solutions to the poem, but yours could be correct, if you were off by even a couple of inches, well….. maybe you should try again! This time with permission lol!

          ________________________________

    • Great adventure JDH! I love hearing all the stories since I am still a few weeks away from going out on my search. I might not agree with your solution but admire your spirit!

      • CJinCA,

        Thanks,

        yeh, my solution came straight from the poem… no map or any other tool other than Wyoming history, even the blaze. Then I had to look at a map to get there. Not much in the field work except for on site searching, but it’s where the poem took me so I had to follow it.

        Good luck to you when you get out. I hope your adventure proves worth the cold.

        jdh

    • I posted today, July 27, 2014 at 9:32 am on this site what I believe to be some helpful answers to clues which if followed will lead to the treasure in Colorado. Please check it out.

  51. did you know that there are 2 ‘belt’ mountains. a big belt and a little belt, I was thinking what did FF do between the belting from his father.

    He said he didn’t think it was fair that he got 2 one from his Dad the Principal, and one from his Dad at home, but what did he do in between? did he run or walk home and just how far was it? Like the time he ran home from College? how far was that?

  52. On my way for a treasure trip to West Yellowstone with my daughter, who just graduated high school. A few months ago when I expressed interest in going up to look, she said “I’m in!” I have a friend who says he would kill to have his daughter want to go on such an expedition. Yes, I know I am lucky.

    So we will spend a few days looking under rocks and enjoying Yellowstone. My philosophy on this hunt is a little like ice fishing: You can have fun ice fishing if you are catching fish, or if the weather is nice. And since you can’t guarantee you will catch fish, the weather had better be nice. So it is with this trip. I will have fun if I find treasure, or if I have a great daddy-daughter trip. Since I can’t guarantee I will find treasure, I WILL have fun with my daughter. She is growing up and leaves for college in the fall – gotta have the fun times when you can.

    I believe the warm water is the Firehole river, and the home of Brown in Yellowstone park (brown is the NFS color, and grizzlies are Brown bears – so Yellowstone, as the first National park, IS the home of Brown.) So the search area is west of the park entrance. I have a few places specifically to look, but regardless of right or wrong on the clues, the trip will be one for the books.

    Thanks, FF, for providing an opportunity to get out with my daughter. I may not find gold, but I have found my treasure……

  53. Hi All,
    Heading up to Wy and Mt next month. Have high hopes(so does everyone else, though right? Ha). Have read the book and studied the clues. No other place it could be. Think someone will find either this year or next. May post tale and photos if anything worthwhile comes of it all. At least looking forward to the Burger and cold beer in West Yellowstone. Really do think treasure is in MT or WY. Mr Fenn would not place anywhere else.
    Good luck all.

  54. Try old Faithful again, look around the area more, i had two dreams that ‘Forrest told me or should i say,” in my dream he said,”I told you old faithful !! in a strong voice.. dream 2 i was walking from behind a wall of some sort of pines and i used my hands to seperate the trees apart and i saw him again, and he said,” ‘Old Faithful”. i don’t know what the dreams mean but it’s worth a shot. and old faithful is Big and significant. it can’t hurt to look again. Just a Thought…

  55. I also think it is Yellowstone. We are headed there sometime this month. Hopefully no one found it over the Fourth of July, however if they did, what a fitting date to find it. Thanks Forrest for exciting so many people!

  56. Just my 2 cents: looked at Sphinx Creek in MT, clues fit perfectly: Mammoth Hot Springs to Gardiner Canyon, Gardiner river to Yellowstone river; to far to walk – 18 miles to Joe Brown Creek where there’s a put in the Yellowstone river; left turn at huge boulders and rapids is Sphinx Creek; Sphinx creek trail I examined every tree for two days and never found a blaze.

    It did occur to me while searching, the comment was made somewhere that “an old man carried it in.” Ever consider he could have carried it in by horseback? My grandfather is in his 90s and can still hike, fish, and ride.

  57. I’ll offer a theory since I’m not able to search. Mr. Fenn was a pilot, so what if his clues are broader (“too far to walk”)? I know it’s thin but follow this:

    Warm waters halt: Mammoth Hot Springs Yellowstone

    Canyon down: Madison River Canyon

    Too far to walk: get a map and follow the clues to the end and go there, instead of walking the whole route linear

    Home of Brown: Brown’s bridge fishing access north of Glen MT

    Nigh: up I15 on the left to highway 43

    No paddle up your creek, heavy loads, water high: Wise river, w/bridge

    If you’ve been wise: Wisdom MT

    Found the blaze: Big Hole National Battlefield (last stand of the Nez Perce)

    Look quickly down: (you have to go there)

    If anyone finds it there, kindly remember me with a gold coin or two

    KJ

  58. Hi Dal,
    Love your photos in general, and of Canyonlands/La Sal Mountains, UT in specific. If it were me, would bury my treasure here. But Mr. Fenn does not think that way. Treasure near YNP, I do think. Headed up that way next week. Wish me luck(or otherwise, you might add .LOL). Will try and follow with some photos and a story. Mr. Fenn, if you are following ,I do appreciate what you are doing and forget all the other “noise” and “troublemakers”. I do think that is unfortunate and not in the spirt of what you have tried to inspire. I “get it” and so do many others here. Good luck to all in “the Chase”.
    Tumbleweed

    • Tumble-
      Those photos are Goofy’s. He is a marvelous photographer and has allowed them to grace our pages. They kinda class up the joint!!!

  59. Hi all searchers,
    We had a wonderful experience in Montana, found some amazing things that maybe clues, please excuse me for not being specific, but we plan to return asap to investigate more. Just a warning, our search was cut short because we had an encounter with a mama grizzly bear. This was not in an isolated location, and other people were around. Dummies were photographing the poor thing and we just happen to be hiking out of our search area to be confronted with mama. We ran through the woods (not suppose to run) and made our way to the road. fortunately mama went up a tree, (not suppose to climb, yea right). We had bear spray in our tent !!! Please keep bear spray handy and read all the rules about being around bears.
    Thanks Mr. Fenn for the thrill of the hunt, It was so exciting. Can’t wait to go back with bear spray and common sense. Maybe that was “brave and in the wood”? and surely “home of Brown must apply.” I am grasping at straws now. After our next trip I will give details of where the search was and what was found.
    Good Luck to All and Be Safe
    Cindy

  60. Just got the book… wonderful stuff… the timely old postmarks make clever blazes. But I was wondering if the 2 colored inks are an aesthetic touch, or … green = go & red = stop. Opinions? And also, if pirates are in warm waters … but the Rosetta poem is all I need … where is the GI cartouche? I’m lost in the weeds… like a hiding boy and homely girl.

    • Do you associate pirates with the Rockies, or the Warm Waters of the Carib? See page 133. GI? Town at north entrance to YSP. if that clue is given in the book… where ‘s its match in the poem? Finding it in the poem would give insight to the type of clues FF planted. FF mentions Rosetta Stone somewhere… the key to hieroglyphs & the cartouche of Cleo. And the last page: omega omega? Horsehoes (measure twice + an inch, pg 135), or “wise” owl eyes petroglyph. No owls in the book, just a wise fox. ” Indecision is the key”… hmmm… Tarry Much? Red ink? Please Touch, I am responsible. The green… 5 on Main. Lots of tall grass in these stories.

      • I’m with you. I have studied the stories extensively. I felt the story about the fire escape slide outside the Spanish (another repeated many times) class was interesting. The mark that the slide made on Forrest’s pants was a brown streak. I thought this could be the home of brown. Anyway, the dream sequence about Gardiner’s Island led me to Gardiner, Montana. Just north of there is a geologic feature named “Devil’s Slide”. Devil’s Slide sports a slide and an accompanying brown streak. This cliff is actually located on private land, but Forrest mentioned in the story about running from the military school that he got hooked on the barbed wire fence. When we arrived at the site, the wire fence was actually down on the ground. I had an idea that the treasure was in a culvert below the slide. We did find several culverts but they were empty. We didn’t go to the river below the slide. We were driving a 30’ RV so had to be careful about the places we went into. But this short, and “easy” hiking was quite strenuous for me. I don’t think this treasure is hidden very far from the parking lot of wherever it is. But Forrest could have helicoptered it in??

        • Gardiner seems to be a clue to a clue … but how and why is still a mystery to me. I wondered about that Devil’s slide… there are several other slides on the maps. I have not seen a NM hunter refer yet to the Gardiner canyon (or creek?) near Raton NM. It seems to have a long man-made configuration near the entrance… perhaps buried missle silos? (No place for the meek.)
          FF warned us that he “bends” words, so I wonder about the Eric Sloan stuff … FF says ES died waiting for a stop light (red-green or switch reference) but other sources say he died on the steps of the Plaza Hotel. And, I found a 3rd color in the book, so that strains any binary go-stop theories. I can make no sense of the Gatsby reference, except that it’s venue is near Captain Kidd’s island site. I think it, and the Bells Toll may just be prep for Catcher, which FF may have used to prep us for some 1st person adolecent verbal expression as he describes his childhood. But Kismet doesn’t fit in… must be the brown dirt or the pocket.
          Some words are too frequent to be ignored… smile – window – switch, etc. Suppose from Gardiner, you don’t go thru the Roosevelt arch, but switch north… up that other road, (an interesting chapel up that way) or, onto the old Yellowstone trail. Those “biddies” might be the park rangers at the entrance gates. Then there are soda caps and that ball of string… possibly the Soda creek entrance & the Grand Loop . And Mom just looked out the window for the postman? .. big PO at Mammoth. I donno, just some arm-chair fun for me.
          I am strong on Norris … where porcelaine basin shines thru a breezeway, obscuring its square shape with bright light… like a round coffee cup obscures the face of a girl. Braids & struts? Parkature perhaps… or boardwalks … and Roaring Mt. yells “That idiot!” Again, I donno. Love to hear all ideasI Write again… Got to get back to C-Span and Syria. Does it ever stop?

          • I am attaching a picture. Google the titles by JD. The yellow spot across the river is the remains of a roof. I know it is not in a structure, but it is hard to argue that this is still a structure. Also imagine the initials JD joined and seen from the back side of the paper. Then think Spanish. (Sorry, evidently I don’t know how to attach a photo. It is a photo of a yellow roof on the ground across a river. )

  61. Its been a while, so took another look … maybe there should be a site for those of us who cant get out and hike a route, we who just play the storylines in the book. Seems the able hikers are relying on the poem, not the stories.

    If you were around in the 40’s, you will enjoy this Eddy that swept me downstream … have you noticed how frequently the word “smile” appears in the stories … a smile isn’t far from a crescent, like the New Moon (pg 146)… for Stout Hearted Men (pg 70). You’ll have to google the yourtube.

    Seriously, I’d like to know more about the about size/number/views etc. of the old window panes in the YS parkature. The “coffee cup” and “That idiot” I got, but there’s still some troubling geometry about coincident and complimentary lines, and 4×6″ sizes. Speaking of parkature, you may recognize a couple of other large “Parks”, abutted like parking spaces & designated by a sign. This is First Grade stuff.
    Just hunching along cryptic ledges, so sorry I can’t physically hunt, but I will dream.

    • Where ya been Old Shadows? I like some of your ideas, well several more I guess. Like Kismet doesn’t fit in… must be the brown dirt. I like the preface to it.

  62. Can anyone tell me what the nightime temperature in Yellowstone is like this time of year? And also if there a lot of mosquitos in the day or at night?

  63. -Old Shadows
    Been thinking about them colors you’ve mentioned earlier in relation to the postmarks…
    -Forrest Email “It’s not easy being Forrest” Kermit the frog reference
    -Turquois row bracelet
    -Reader’s digest “relish the riches” .
    -do not tamper/please touch I am responsible?
    -Cadence “Stand up, hook up, shuffle to the door, green light go what the hell you waiting for!”

    My wife think I’m absolutely nuts for what I’ve done, but I say, “Do you see that little line? That means it took two trips and wasn’t a factory make.” But it might take a week before she see things my way.

    • Were you a paratrooper? Thank you … hope you get rich.
      Them colors may just be too insignificant to be insignificant, but I’ve been thinking shapes more than colors. Liked your thought provoking comments & will keep an eye out for that little line.

  64. First of all, thanks to Dal for this fascinating blog, and to all the other contributors whose thoughts and ideas make very interesting reading. And of course, thanks also to Forrest Fenn for the tantalizing mystery.

    I started pondering the whereabouts of the treasure back around New Year’s, and came up with a shortlist that included NM, CO and MT. After studying the available info, I became convinced that the hiding place had to be near Yellowstone, and more specifically Hebgen Lake. Although I did not manage to find places that corresponded to every line of the poem, I found enough to convince me to take a trip. My wife and I have just returned from that area (empty handed), but not disheartened.

    Begin it where warm waters halt:
    The relatively warm waters of the Madison River come to a halt in Hebgen Lake, due to the presence of the dam. We started our search at the lake. I was fairly sure that the treasure would not be within the Yellowstone National Park itself, due to the potential for legal issues, and so Hebgen, which lies just outside the Park boundaries, and features in Forrest’s writings, was the perfect starting point for me.

    And take it in the canyon down,
    I took the canyon to be that through which the Madison River flows. At Hebgen, it doesn’t display the traditional characteristics of a canyon, as it’s a wide and fairly open area, but I couldn’t get the same degree of congruence with other lines in the poem if I was to move downstream to the area around Earthquake Lake (which is where the Madison was halted by a huge landslide following a quake early in the 20th century).

    Not far, but too far to walk,
    Put in below the home of Brown.
    This seemed to be a reference to boating. The words “Put in” are used far more commonly in boating than in land travel, and that would also work for the “too far to walk” phrase. The problem was to find the home of Brown. I wasn’t convinced by the notions of brown trout and brown bear, but thought there had to be a more specific reference. Well before the trip I began to research the businesses and homes surrounding Hebgen Lake. It was then that I discovered Firehole Ranch. This fishing lodge on the south side of the lake has, for the past two decades, been the “home” of chefs Bruno and Kris Georgeton. I don’t know whether Bruno and Kris actually reside at Firehole, but I didn’t find it too much of a stretch to link their semi-permanent occupational status to that line of the poem. In addition, there were boat landings below the ranch, as well as a suitable parking spot should one choose not to come by water.

    From there it’s no place for the meek,
    The end is ever drawing nigh;
    There’ll be no paddle up your creek,
    Just heavy loads and water high.
    It was all very well having the Hebgen landmarks fitting the early stanzas, but unless there was also a correlation with the later verses, it would be a pointless exercise. However, with a little study of the map and nearby topography, everything seemed to fall into place. Emptying into the lake near Firehole Ranch are two creeks, Watkins and Coffin. Wait a minute….! Coffin? Heavy loads? End ever drawing nigh? And when I searched further I spotted two lakes, Coffin and Upper Coffin nestling in the mountains about five or six miles to the southwest of the ranch. Was that too far? It would certainly work with the line, “Your effort will be worth the cold,” as the lakes were at an altitude of around 8,500 ft. And not only that, but the creeks fed by these lakes looked totally unnavigable, but there was, fortuitously, a very navigable trail that would take us up to Coffin Lake. However, my sights were set on Upper Coffin Lake, the place where the water really was high.

    And so, with only a few days available due to work commitments, we headed out from Eugene, Oregon, planning on having just a single day to explore the trail. My wife was very nervous, as there were warnings of grizzlies in the very area we planned to hike. We armed ourselves with bear spray, stowed food, water and a few survival aids in our packs, and headed up the trail. I’m glad that we didn’t hear the news until the following morning: in two separate incidents hikers were attacked by grizzly bears, despite taking all the recommended precautions. It seems that mother grizzlies with cubs in tow are not going to be easily deterred. We rang a bell, sang and generally made our presence known up that trail.

    I’m almost sixty, and in what I would class as fair, but not great, shape. As we hiked up the astoundingly beautiful trail with the rocks and peaks rising above us, I pondered whether an eighty-year-old could manage it carrying a forty-pound chest. Although the trail was easy going to begin with, after about three miles it became fairly strenuous with switchbacks that rose through the forest, in an area that abounded with huckleberry bushes – a favorite with the bears, apparently! We tried to stay vigilant for the “blaze” as we climbed alongside the creek. Noticing many trees downed along the trail, it occurred to me that the blaze had to be something that would be more permanent, but we saw nothing obvious.

    Eventually, after hiking for something like 2.5 hours, we came alongside Coffin Lake. It’s a majestic setting, as it’s surrounded on three sides by cliffs of stone and pine. Without a boat – or the willingness to swim in icy waters – I realized that it would be impossible to explore the entire circumference of the lake, and, in any event, there was nothing that presented itself as a viable place to search. We sat and rested for a short while, had something to eat, and then considered our next move. I was all for pushing on to Upper Coffin Lake, but my wife would have happily stayed put at our present location until it was time to return. Gamely, she agreed to come with me to the place I was convinced was the hiding place. In truth, I was happy to leave a place where previous campers had used the lakeside as their personal latrine, befouling the area for the next visitors. Notices at the trail head request that campers carry a shovel – for good reason.

    This was where I bit off a bit more than we both could chew. I had assumed that a trail would lead straight from Coffin to Upper Coffin, as on the map it was a short distance of around 600ft. On the ground it was a very different story. Rocks, almost impenetrable forest, and “alpine” meadows that rose at ludicrous angles lay in the way. We stumbled and climbed, until my incredibly supportive wife was about ready to quit. Meanwhile, I thought my heart was going to do the same thing. Twice, I smelled what I thought was bear, but decided on the second occasion to keep my thoughts to myself. I had a compass, and knew the direction to the lake, but couldn’t find a way through. Eventually, I caught a glimpse of it – hundreds of feet below us, down a treacherously steep incline. I was so glad we’d had the sense to bring collapsible sticks, as I don’t think we would have made it down there without broken bones. It took us around an hour to travel those six hundred crow-fly feet!

    Upper Coffin Lake is a smaller version of its sibling, and again is not readily circumnavigable by land. We didn’t stay long, briefly checking in the shallows for likely chests, fearing that time would not be on our side. And it was clear that the place is just too remote for Forrest to have hidden his treasure there – unless he was feeling ultra-sadistic. We tried to get back to Coffin Lake via a more direct route, but came unstuck due to more impassable terrain. That said, my wife did discover a large “blaze” of reddish stone that pointed down to a creek. She scrambled down to check, but came up empty-handed.

    We wanted to be out of there before dusk, when bears would most likely be on the prowl. We tried to keep an eye out for hiding places we might have missed, but we were now pretty beat. One mistake was that we had only taken two liters of water with us, and in the August heat, and with all the climbing, it was way too little. We staggered back to the parking lot, dehydrated and with incredibly sore muscles, blistered and bleeding feet, and just mildly disappointed!

    We may have missed the treasure by a few feet, or (more likely) by a few hundred miles! But it was a great day out in the mountains, and I think we both came away feeling pleased with ourselves for making the effort and
    not letting the fear of bears get in the way. I am annoyed at myself for pushing to go further than what was comfortable for my wife, but I suppose I’d allowed myself to be convinced that I “knew” where the treasure was; and when that kind of thing happens I become very focused and not easily deterred. Back at the hotel, my wife used the word “foolhardy,” but in a cheery way – and I think she’s forgiven me that. But I hope others will learn from my mistakes and not try to push too hard in their search.

    It was an expensive exercise – the price of hotels and gas seem to have skyrocketed, but to borrow a celebrity’s well known catchphrase, you have to be in it to win it. Good luck to all those who are “in it!”

    • Wow!
      Great solution Bear…
      and wonderful detail…thanks so much for sharing…
      Next time you do one of these send it in an email with a pic ortwo and I’d be happy to post it as a story on the blog..

      Thanks again…great stuff!!

  65. Rebecca… hope the pic you sent shows up. Let me know where it is. I don’t get the JD ref. I’ll have to do some re-reading. Spanish does seem to be a hint … with or without Miss Ford. The language flow in BLUE JEANS AND HUSH PUPPIES seems natural (thus clueless), but that picture screams SPANISH. (pg 104) It must have a back-story because to my artless eyes it looks like a drag queen with a dislocated shoulder. My guess is it is there only to affirm SPANISH.
    Ford, also being a crossing, might be CRUCES. There may be more red herrings here than brown trout.

  66. Glad you said that PKennedy6, because I think so too.… and if I am correct, the New Mexico Chamber of Commerce will owe me big time. Everybody head south. Here’s why…
    In MY SPANISH TOY FACTORY: marbles, yoyos, nickels, pies … all circles, plus 2 crossed lines at First and French. Then a gallant wish: to push a nickel under an old woman’s gravestone. Imagine a graphic like a gun sight, a circle under a cross,. It appears again, more refined, on page 99, Google the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry. Next, check that map with the nuggets & frog, sorta cross shaped, and see the coin? Now Google the NM flag. There are more, but this is enough to convince me, NM.
    RED… DO NOT TOUCH! Spanish Red = Colorado. Those kids crossing on a rope — Highway 25 from Cheyenne to Raton. Cross over, do not touch.
    I thought for a long time the treasure was in Yellowstone area (I won’t explain all my deductions, but they were several & strong). However, I switched at FLYWATER, where, I think FF says goodbye to those places — they belong to others now. Peggy, who always let Forrest do what he chose, is his treasure. And so together she chose New Mexico… if you know what I mean.
    Papa’s story in IMP LIT was Farewell to Arms. War always resonates deeply, and it’s a bitch in our cortex (cortii?). Forging bells to toll in some distant future is hope saying: Know me. I knew things. I loved. The thin spine and broad shoulders of FF’s book will halt proud on bookshelves alongside many others who spoke their hopes to us even before we were.
    For fun, check this site. Hit the Home tab, watch it’s long slide show, and if you don’t blink, you may see FF’s ball of string. http://www.mapsofnewmexico.com/AccordianTabs/NewMexicoMapsandGuides/StateMaps.php
    I hope my blaze here helps, doesn’t spoil, and you find a treasure in NM. The Shadow knows, but this Shadow is old and can’t hike or she would do it herself.

  67. DAL,
    Our second trip to Montana. Wonderful trip with memories to last a life time but no treasure, yet. We think we found the blaze but couldn’t cross the water due to safety, so plan on returning in the Spring. That will make for trip # 3 to Montana in a year. I now feel I belong to the Fennster club (as we like to refer to others looking/lurking around).

    Last trip we had a run in with a bear so could not finish our exploring of the area. We completed our search of the area ( with bear spray in hand), caves, and caves at the water line, Only had one run in with a fly fisherman who resented our wanting to cross the river. My little friend did her best to negotiate with him, but no luck, so we had to do another strenuous hike (for us old ones). Later on the muscle of our group hiked back and explored the water caves, which they reported as being amazing, but no treasure.

    Our next stop, we explored carefully and found a blaze or two, but we couldn’t cross the creek due to some deep areas and fast water. Our GPS also conked out on us. Frustrating!! I’m sure many have felt that. I would attached a few pics of our cave hunt, and blaze.but can’t figure out how. We live close to you- good ol Bellingham. Good luck to all and I will be searching again next spring if no treasure is found before then.

    Cindy

    • Cindy-
      I’m not certain where you were looking but spring runoff is higher than fall runoff. Spring is when the snow melt occurs.You may have seen the stream at it’s lowest flow for the year.

      • Hi,
        We are planning on taking a boat with proper equipment. Seems like we have to learn from our mistakes, or we are discovering new things as the hunt goes creating new solutions to new problems. We are focusing around the Madison river. I also had to divert a search area in the Lamarr Valley due to hundreds of Bison being in the way.. Didn’t feel like being tromped to pieces. I still maintain some common sense thank goodness for that. Always be safe.
        Thanks for the reply
        Cindy

  68. Just learned about the treasure a few days ago. We live in Montana and actually have done so much hiking and sight seeing the last couple yrs that it is crazy. Many trips to Yellowstone, Glacier, Grand Tetons and many various lakes around the area etc. Wish we had known about this treasure then as we have covered so much ground already.
    I will keep you posted as we dont plan on stopping our fun, we will just include this treasure hunt now! As far as the clue’s nothing stands out in my mind at this time other than the normal things everyone else has thought of but if something comes up or we think of something we will post.

  69. I picked up my copy of his new book, Too Far to Walk, on Monday at Collected Works in Santa Fe. It was already autographed!

    According to FF in his new book, too far to walk is ten miles (Preface, pg xiii). And, there is an implication that the cover photo is his shadow cast on the Madison River (“That day never came for me, and my disappointment still casts a lonesome shadow across the Madison River.”)

    His youthful fishing trip covered “…few miles from West Yellowstone, Montana, and fished downstream to Baker’s hole.”

    I don’t know which way the Madison runs at that point. He says he fished “downstream” from his put in point, but, on my maps, Baker’s Hole (Campground) is North of his starting point.

    Does the Madison run North from West Yellowstone, MT?

    t.

  70. Dal – Are there clues within Too Far Too Walk such as above 5000 feet, not in a grave yard, etc.? If so, how many? I realize you are a searcher too, but you seem to have the latest information from FF. Thank you in advance.

    • See my comment above. I think there are clues in TFTW. In the preface he notes that the river trip was about 10 miles, and although he’d like to do it again, it’s too far to walk.

      There’s a photo of his father holding a “trophy brown.”

      The map in the back of the book indicating the search area extends it in New Mexico all the way to the Aztec Ruins, far west of the Rocky Mountains.

      I’ve been spending more time searching than reading, but I’ll get to it this week.

      Regards,

      t.

  71. pkennedy-
    Many will disagree with me on this topic…
    Heck, I might even disagree with myself …

    I do not believe there are any clues to the location of the chest in the new book, other than what Forrest has said…”The new book contains clues because the map is in the new book.”
    However, this map shows the search area to be the region we already understood to be the search area so….

    Others will go over the map with a magnifying glass and come up with secret x’s and oddities they will be convinced are “hidden” clues. But I don’t believe that’s true. The illustrations, the photos and the map were created not by Forrest’s hands. Forrest had no control over any errors or oddities that might be on the map. The map was created by the cartographers at Benchmark. Likewise Forrest’s designer created all the wonderful small design details in the book and his illustrator created all the drawings…

    These things are out of Forrest’s immediate control. So I do not believe these elements contain any “hidden” clues.
    That leaves me with the text…But because Forrest tells us that there are no clues other than the map and because I believe him I don’t think there are direct “clues” in the stories. In other words I don’t believe that because the book contains the story about Forrest’s good friend Wolfie driving his plane into the side of a mountain…that we will find the treasure on the mountain where Wolfie died. That is not a clue to the location of the treasure because Forrest told us that there are no clues in the book…beyond the map.

    However, all of this being said, I do believe both books are extremely valuable reading for any searcher because they do provide clues to Forrest himself, his humor, his manner of speaking, his character, background, interests, friendships, disappointments and plans. All of this is very valuable in determining how to solve the puzzle of the poem.

    • Dal – Thanks for the viewpoint. I was struck by the fact that he mentions two Indians named Joe who are now dead. Could be a veiled reference to either Chief Joseph trail or Dead trail/peak in Wyoming. All are near Cody, WY.

      • He didn’t say there are no other clues in the book…he said “The new book contains clues because the map is in the new book.”
        It was a direct answer to the question:
        “Are there clues in the new book?”

        • Interesting. Didn’t he once say something similar about TTOTC? “….because the poem is in the book?” We know there’s at least one; regarding how far too far to walk is. In my opinion, I’ve already seen as second, based on my search strategy. I’ll be there are others, as well.

          • Toby-
            If you read some of his latest scrapbooks and the conversation Goofy had with him that is published over on chase chat I think you will note that Forrest’s idea of a clue is different from what many searchers consider a clue.

        • Didn’t Forrest say in an interview that TFTW is a sequel to TTOTC? So same kind of subtle clues would be in TFTW like they are in TTOTC, right?

  72. Does anyone know if the government shutdown and closing of National parks will effect our ability to find Forrest’s treasure?

  73. Does anyone know the current status of National Forest trails, gates and roads outside of Yellowstone? Are they open or closed due to the government shutdown?

    • I have seen news that says National Parks are closed. I also saw news that the House was going to pass a law that would open National Parks.

      I heard a piece on NPR last night about a guy who had permits to float through the Grand Canyon. The permits are notoriously hard to get and the date on his started yesterday. he spent $2000 in permits fees and $30,000 in prep, gear, travel etc for his team. Now he is sitting in his truck outside the gate hoping they open them.

      http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=228551338

      My friend who’s father was and brother is a Park Ranger said they keep only essential staff at the parks, law enforcement, etc.
      .

    • The trails and roads that I saw are open in the Gallatin NF. However many of the NF campgrounds and all of the NF facilities like restrooms, showers and offices are closed. The campgrounds in the NF that are serviced by private contractors are open but the campgrounds serviced by NF staff are closed. The joint NF/NP center in West Yellowstone is closed. The park and all the entrances to the park are gated and closed. I don’t know about other National Forests around Yellowstone…only the Gallatin. The animals in the park are probably loving this.

      • Dal, are you there now? If you are, how are the roads? I saw a web cam and it looked like there was snow in the area, up to a foot or so.

  74. I’m attending the event on the afternoon of November 2nd at Moby Dickens Book Shop in Taos. I have been granted permission by Forrest and the proprietor of the bookshop to video record the event. I’ll upload it to my YouTube account after I edit and render it. I’ll post the link to the end of this thread.

    If you have any questions you’d like to have Forrest answer, please add them to this thread. I plan to write them on 3×5 cards and present them to the moderator when he asks if there are any questions from the audience.

    I reserve the right to edit any question that includes the use of the word “metaphysical.”

    Regards,

    t.

  75. I had read something in the past about initials carved in a tree in YNP “JOR” (pretty certain). Don’t know what they might stand for and whether they are even still around, believe it was 1800’s when carved. Well I do not plan nor recommend looking for this tree but it would be interesting if one of us knows more about the initials or even if they exist and can take a photo for us arm chair rustlers.

      • Dal,
        Forrest has said that the treasure might be hidden for a thousand years, do you think that this means the blaze could not be something associated with a tree, since most trees don’t live a thousand years?

        • Mike, there are trees(olive trees) in the middle east over 1k yrs old.Maybe petrified trees if your clues point in that direction…

        • I agree Mike. I don’t believe the blaze is anything likely to be affected by weather or fire or aging. I keep telling myself that it’s geological but I have no evidence to support that.

          On the other hand what if the blaze was one of the historic trails..like the Santa Fe or the Oregon or Mormon or California…These old trails are still visible in many places in the mountains. They are often times preserved in some places as national monuments…In some places the wagon wheel ruts are carved into the rock path..
          One could argue they will be around for a long, long time..

          Petroglyphs might be considered by Forrest to be a form of blaze..a marking…
          There are millions of these scattered around the mountains..so the other clues might take you near an area where petroglyphs are found..

          As far as trees go the only thing I’ve heard that Forrest ever told anyone about trees was to Stephanie.. I think..
          Talking about the chest he said “It’s not in a tree but it’s surrounded by trees. Of course everything is surrounded by trees if you go out far enough.”

          • Thank you for the Yellowstone link. Dal good stuff about the park. A few years ago my family visited YNP and want to return and go at our own pace. Now thati know about TOTC it will be all the better.

            Re: 1000 years. There may also be historical places or such that only remain in books and maybe remembered by different names. Xyz river does not exist (I think) I could look for it on modern maps to no avail. Using a historical map may be the only way to discover it.
            Just another thought and one I usually consider when I am stuck.

          • Dal,
            Thanks so much for that great answer. I have been looking in an area with lots of old mines and there are old trails along those hillsides. Friday I found an old burned down cabin in a beautiful meadow. You are amazingly generous with all your insights and this site is really fun. Thanks
            Mike

          • I still maintain that the blaze could be the trail you make by following other clues. Then it’s fresh/doesn’t need to be 1000 years old. Just don’t use breadcrumbs. ;)

          • A blaze is also a group of three or more trees forming a natural cupped area, great for secreting a treasure chest inside. The “f” and running man photos that Mr. Fenn submitted but with no comment, possibly indicates HIS marking that will be on the group of trees. Looking quickly down also could mean that it is just below the surface , and a quick brush off would reveal it. You would definately be in the wood. And taking a flashlight would be helpful to remove it at night after finding it in the day, so you don’t get bonked on the head as you take it to your car! Trees sure are treasures whether old or new. Then again, so are memories…hum. just a thought!

        • So, to be quite certain, the chest is more likely to be in a rock formation, while the
          blaze could on a tree, on a rock, on a meadow, on a horse – no, wait, not on a horse, but may be on a statue of a horse…
          Just because the chest might stay hidden for a 1000 years, doesn’t mean that there are any “1000 year warranties” for the blaze. Or are there ?

        • If I were to hide a treasure chest, and if I wanted to make sure I would know, whether it is still there, I would do the following: Hide a small GPS device within the wood of the box, and rig it up so that it is connected to light-sensitive diode. This diode (a type of switch)
          would keep the GPS QUIET while the box is
          closed, but when the box is opened the diode switches the GPS on, and a signal goes out to tell me that the box has been opened. Since Fenn was a military pilot, he would know about “wireless beacons” and similar technology. These types of technology can nowadays be made very small and easily hidden.

          It is may be not foolproof, because someone else can have the same idea, find the chest,
          and choose to open it in complete darkness, thereby not activating the GPS. And as long as it, the chest, is staying in the dark, no one and not Fenn either would know.

          So, as usual, nothing is ever 100%.

          • he talks about them using a beacon to locate him when he was shot down. He also talks about his crystal radio that didn’t need batteries. I think he also talks about being into electronics while in the military. So I think he has the know how to do a lot of those things.

        • Hi,
          I think the chest can be seen openly if you know how to look. A reflection, at the right time of day and year and the person needs to be in the right location. I have a few things I am working on for my 3rd trip out to Montana. The last 2 trips have been a blast!! The puzzle has kept my mind busy for a whole year. Mr. Fenn is very shrewd as we all know, I really try to become him when I am hunting or working on clues. Love the man! It can be seen, that is how he knows it is still there.
          Cindy

  76. Hey all! I’m not new to the chase, but new to commenting. I have been working on this dilema of a poem for almost three years now!
    I feel his ball of string comment was meant to say unravel the clues. That is the only way the ball could have been removed from the room!
    I head out this May, 2014, to meet Mr. Fenn and then on to my one and only spot that I have deduced to be the treasure location. All his clues fit.
    I figured out the location after realizing what Mr. Fenn says is often exactly what he means. He leaves the thought in your brain, and it can be your worst enemy, turning things into a monster when it really should be exactly like he says it should be. As adults, we often want to see things in a more difficult light, thinking that is how it should be. He knows this, so can actually give you a straight answer and know you will twist it for him! I love that in him! He keeps us on our toes, and urges us to THINK.
    Read “Flywater” and “Journal of a trpper” like he suggests. After I did, it opened my eyes to so many of the things he was referring to in his poem, I figured it out quickly.
    I have one spot, and one spot only. Each clue fits snuggly with no interpretation or double meaning!
    I’ve enjoyed you, Dal and Stephanie. I feeI I know you both personally and have been with you both in spirit during each of your adventures. I will continue following the blogs and pop in my two cents worth.
    Luck to all, and happy hunting!

    • Hi Donna,
      Good luck on your search. I have been on two searches and both were memorable and worth the time. I agree with you, I think that what we seek is in front of us and not hard to see. We have been searching with the mind set of a child, not only does it open our eyes to things we may not see it makes life exciting and new again. It is easy to get all wrapped up and confused, I think it is a puzzle but literal as well. I have another spot picked out and will head out this summer, can’t wait!! Good luck Cindy

    • Hi Donna, Thanks for the kind words. I never read Trapper, but I did Flywater and I believe found one of the best clues in that book. Look forward to hearing about your adventure ;-)

  77. Yellowstone makes since to me, Comment 1 – Getting Started:

    Okay, let’s start from the beginning. ff idolized his father and was very sad how quickly his father was forgotten. Not wanting to suffer the same fate, ff came up with TTOTC. To keep the fond memories of times with his father alive, ff often draws from his childhood to young adult days, with many of the enjoyable times being at Yellowstone (a favorite of his father). This makes me believe that WWWH must be Yellowstone itself or a feature within Yellowstone, some hot spring(s) or geysers. If you believe that Yellowstone is where it is at, the actual WWWH doesn’t matter, i.e. if you can identify the correct canyon in Yellowstone that ff was fond of. I suspect that the canyon would be in northwest Yellowstone where ff and his dad had easy and frequent access; and where they fished a lot, such as Firehole, Madison, etc. Those who have read TTOTC and all other ff writings might have an advantage on identifying which canyon. USGS topo maps would be a great aid in identifying canyons. Make your own list of potential canyons to research and possibly search. An access road down in the canyon running along a creek/river is a must.

    • I agree 100%! I won’t say, but I found all the clues there! Really ready to head out, dang snow! Mr. Fenn spent his young summers being a Tom Sawyer, exploring and fishing and helping to support his family. It is so admirable. I really idolize his morals, values and how he cares for our earth and us! We have to all say a prayer of thanks to his Father and Mother for being such wonderful people, THEY made Mr. Fenn what his is today! A modern day hero! At least he is MY hero, and there are not many people out there that can wear those shoes! So, listen to what he says, read the poem a million times and the books even more! And, just live in peace!

  78. Happy Thanksgiving to all! I recall reading that brown trout were first planted in Firehole R. (home of Brown). Also re: NM could also refer to Hispanic. A last thought is I think the poem was written for the ages therefore clues should have generational longevity.

    • German Brown trout were not introduced in the Northwest, right radcrad? Wasn’t it the Loch Leven Brown trout that were introduced in/around Yellowstone? I had a theory about the Red Baron and Forrest idolizing Robin Olds and “the leader of the lads” surrounding that idea. What color uniforms/planes did the Germans use? Great movie starring Mads Mikkelsen about that. Wondering if there were any POW camps near Yellowstone when Forrest was about 13-15 years old? I read that there were a lot of German immigrant communities with great double-bitted axe skills surrounding this area. No offense to Germans..I remember that Forrest said his mother was German and that he spent time stationed there during the Vietnam war.

      • One thing to consider is in that time the mining communities were often associated with different lineages..Germans would run one mine, Irish another….and yet Chinese another…maybe one would do some looking into the mines of the area??

  79. Hey Donna, When will you be searching again? I don’t follow the blogs much, just heard about the treasure last spring. I’m making vacation plans for the end of next August to search my spot. I don’t know the weather in the area, what do you think would be a good time to go?Don’t find it before then, I want to atleast get to look HAHAHA.

    • Diver1, I will be headed to Sante Fe in late May or early June. But have been told the bears are really hungry that time of year so mey wait til August when the trees are super colorful. Will know for certain this spring! Keep blogging and we can keep in touch. Peace!

      • Hi Donna, I have the exact same concern. No good finding the Trove and instantly becoming animal food.
        Happy Thanksgiving. I’ll definitely blog. I only checked it a few times before. I felt I didn’t have much to say, But I really love the Chase.

  80. I read both and come to a conclusion in Sept but to late to go looking. I’ll try next year, maybe we’ll all be there together. I can’t go until end of August, which is killing me to wait that long.
    Maureen

  81. Hi Maureen – I noticed your screen name diver1..did you know Da Vinci invented the “Diver’s Dress” and that he used an inverted glass in water to get the idea for the Diving Bell that is used today? The cable series “Da Vinci’s Demons” shows him using one to go through the sewer to access a pool inside the Vatican and to eventually enter the Vatican Secret Archives. The “Spear of Destiny” and the skull of a “dragon” were shown to be there. Thinking of a Clovis Point spear and the children’s book “Dragonology”..I would definitely buy this book. Forrest’s brother, Skippy, enjoyed diving. I wept when I read how he passed away in the book.

  82. Been doing some thinking on the sentence on page 133 in TTOTC. The dream. It seems very out of place to me. I do think I know what is meant by it though. Gardiner Mt. and Gardiner’s Is. hmmm. nah to easy. It is a clue for sure.

  83. I have had another revelation on one of the poem clues!! I absolutely get chills when I figure one of them out and KNOW what Forrest means by it. I have 3 I am absolutely certain of. I hope to have this in the bag by spring and head to the area to search for the blaze. Ya know the poem is always in my mind and as I go through my day something has happens or I hear something to make it completely clear to me. As with the last one I was watching a series on netflix and a line was said by an actor and it just floored me!! THATS IT!!!! and I say wow Forrest thats how your mind works!! It’s like he said ” you will move with confidence nothing will be accidental.” I am sorry but IF I do find the chest I will never tell. It has to be that way.

    • I agree that it should never be made public. I’m headed to Yellowstone this Saturday. Bringing my snowshoes. And if this trip is lucrative I’ll never tell.

      • Dear Ninja,

        Bring handwarmers, snowboots, two sets of sweaters, major anoraks, survival gear, bear spray, etc. because it looks like Yellowstone is going to be somewhere below Zero this weekend, and I don’t mean just the wind chill. I get chills just going out for groceries, as I live in the general neioghborhood of Yellowstone.

        • One of the features of Yellowstone is the number of webcams they have spread all over the park. You can take a look at how deep the snow is and how fiercely the wind is howling without having to be there to feel it..If only Osbourne Russell and Joe Meek could have had access to webcams…

          • Yeah, and because I went and hacked and reviewed all the recorded webcams going back 5 years, I saw in one of them how and where Forrest was hiding the treasure trove. It’s all on film.
            No, wait, that was just wishful thinking…

  84. That could be exactly how he knows it hasn’t been found yet. Ya know put some rocks limbs a blaze up to see if it’s knocked down. I’ll smile at him this spring! lol!

    • That was my belief as well mrclean. Many others have proposed some type of electronic trip wire or gps device that would alert FF to his treasure being found, but I thought that maybe he was utilizing webcams that were already in place and accessible to anyone online.

  85. I am quite sure no cameras where I believe it to be, but it is a great thought. I think he knows the human psyche that can’t keep a secret. Remember “two people can keep a secret”…. I did pull up the Old Faithful Geyser cam and would you believe it!! A wolf trotted through !!!! That made my day!

  86. To bad I can’t see the blaze with google earth. I do wonder what the blaze actually is. It must be something that stands the test of time or it will be of no use to the searcher in the long run. I do think it could be a pile of rocks, or at least arranged rocks….F…?

  87. Well I was scared off! I got to west yellowstone and was informed by the locals that I would be arrested if I got caught on property without a permit, the kind I cannot obtain! So I suppose I’ll wait til spring to go hunting :/

    • He’s said he doesn’t encourage anyone tresspassing. So it’s probably not on any land like you were trying to access. Just a thought….a safety one….Glad your ok.

    • Been arrested before. It’s not so bad, I’m thinking, if you’re a millionaire. ;)

      Ah, but you said permit, not permission. And west YS, so I’m guessing you were trying to get a snowmobile pass into YNP , which is impossible this time of year unless you’re part of a registered tour group. And they only go to 3 or 4 pre-set places.
      Can you go all grizzly Adams and just sno shoe it in?

      • Oh I must have misunderstood them…I see what you mean by needing a permit. I did read that they are opening YNP soon. I don’t understand why they close and open it. Why not always keep it open? I mean at least have a section of it open or something.

        • The wildlife need time to do things privately. That’s why the park is sometimes closed. Another is staffing. The summer temporary staff have different skills than the winter temporary staff. The park is almost always open to foot traffic. But if you want to take a wheeled vehicle..you have to be there when the roads are clear of snow. They do not plow the loop road in winter. Only one stretch of road at the north is plowed. So only snowmobiles can use most of the roads in winter and those machines are very tightly regulated. Once they start plowing in April they allow bicycles and roller skates in…then finally autos when the roads are open to Old Faithful Lodge…

  88. Farmers Almanac says it’s going to be a cold winter, hope the snow doesn’t get deep up there..LOL! Anyone care to mention the average depth around W. Yellowstone? Just want to get an idea of when to come back and finish my search. I went in May last year and was still a good bit around.

    • So far they’ve had at least 10 feet of snow. Our local Tv news sent a reporter up to Jackson a few days ago…that’s where the 10 ft came from. I’ve been there in June and it has been OK, but I can get there ( East Entrance) in about 4 hours, so it’s no big deal. Since there is no news to report, they tell us when the Park closes. When the snow plows start in the Spring, we get a daily report. The earliest I’m going to search my area, which is not your area, is the third week in June.

  89. Wow! 10 ft.!! I hope it stays up there. I think your area is a bit to high in elevation. I hope mine is clear enough in May again. Thanks a bunch Karen and Merry Christmas.

  90. I figure he knows whether it’s been found because he hid it so well that only the 100% exact solution will find it and getting that exact solution might take many trips (and years) to places in the Rockies to understand the clues. It’s a tiny 10″ box that could be under water, buried, in a cave, in an old mine, on a ledge…
    I figure anyone who has the first clues right will eventually send him their ideas and solution or ask a relevant question and it’s those questions that clue him in on whether people are getting closer or not. JMO

      • When did he say it wasn’t in water? I have NEVER heard him say that. Water is an element. Even if it were in water it would be exposed to all those things. Dal are you aware that he’s said it’s NOT in water or Donna can you tell me where you saw that he actually said that?

        • Steph:

          Although he (to my knowledge) has never said it was in, or not in water, he has made a couple of statements that strongly suggest it is not in water.

          1. He told a searcher that his three year old daughter could walk right up to it and pick it up if she could lift it.

          2. He has suggested that it is exposed to natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods and fire.

          • Mark from Iowa said that he was told that about his daughter, but then Forrest told me to post that he didn’t say that. So I don’t know why Forrest wanted to clarify that. It might have been the way that Mark said it…I don’t know. I don’t even know where that conversation took place…probably on my old blog, but I do remember that’s how it went down. I don’t know about the other things if they still can hold true if it were in water, but I think it’s important to not assume and say something was said by Forrest if it wasn’t. I’m not saying that in anyway to be snarky…just think we need to be careful about how things are put…but that’s me.

          • Dal’s second comment is where I understood that it was not under water. If it was, it would not be exposed to fire. That is where I deduced it. Also, 3 yr old would not be in a river and able to touch it. Logic dictates…not in water. Just sayin’ ;)

          • I’m not saying it’s not a good opinion you have. I’m saying that I didn’t recall him saying those words.
            What you said….
            “He said it WAS NOT in water, but exposed to the elements of fire, snow, rain, mud slides etc. Just FYI”
            Please don’t take that as snarky like I said…I don’t mean it that way. I just think to say he said it, because that’s your opinion gets the wrong information out there.

          • With regard to ““He said it WAS NOT in water, but exposed to the elements of fire, snow, rain, mud slides etc.”

            I think that if it is exposed to fire, that could mean only 2 things “forest fires” and “volcanoes”. Somehow, volcanoes don’t seem reasonable.
            So “forest fires” is the reasonable choice. That means it is somewhere
            in a forested area, (“brave and in the woods”) and more likely than not, it is in an area that has forests near a rocky structure. That’s because he said “it is not a man made structure”, which I take to mean that it’s “some type of structure”.
            Since trees don’t go and spontaneously form a “structure”, it’s more likely
            to be a rock like structure, a type of natural cave formation.

            Beyond that, of course, it’s anyone’s guess.

          • Also, his plans were to curl up around it and sleep forever. He changed that line in the poem, but didn’t say he changed his hiding spot. Can’t imagine him curling around a small chest under the water. Guess it is what you want to believe. Truth will tell when it is found! Peace¥

        • Agreed! Never heard any such quote: The chest can be in a tree, under a waterfall, buried underground, lying in an open field, in a hot spring, or inside the belly of a bear :)

          All the items in the chest lend themselves to a wet /damp spot, too, IMO

  91. Be careful in the snow. I did a 12 hr struggle for survival last year in West Yellowstone after getting caught out in the afternoon when the snow got soft. Suddenly the morning hard pack became slush and it took 12 hrs to make it a few miles. It got dark and I didn’t have a flashlight. (I should have listened to Forrest).
    Funny enough, if it stays below 20-25 Deg F and/or there’s good cloud cover, it’s actually better for searching to keep the ground frozen. (if the sun is out, then it better be 25 F or below or it gets real soft).
    But in the end, it’s just too hard to find anything but lot’s of snow in the snow.

    • He has suggested that searchers wait till spring. He’s never said you can’t find it in winter that I’m aware of…but he seems to suggest that it’s best to wait till the snow is gone. Has he ever said anything to you Dal about winter? Someone pointed out a video from the Ruiz family where they were talking to a guy at Collected Works and he says that Forrest said something like, it wouldn’t be wise to search in the snow.

  92. There is also the no cell service in mountain areas to consider.Say you slip on ice, its probably going to be difficult to get help. I believe he wants everyone to be safe.

  93. I know he’s tried to dissuade folks from looking in winter. I assume that is a safety concern. He knows a lot of folks out looking are unfamiliar with the mountain landscape to start with and not sufficiently aware of how life threatening things can get in just a short period of time.
    I assume that if the treasure is difficult to find without snow then both the trek and the discovery would be a magnitude of 4 or 5 times more difficult in winter and in snow.
    I don’t believe “worth the cold” has anything to do with freezing your butt off looking for it in winter. Remember, his goal was to get kids and families outside looking…I doubt that his plan was to turn folks from urban centers or the deep southeast into Grizzly Adams…

    • Maybe f used “cold” because he was just looking for a word that rhymed with “gold”. He had already used “old” and “bold” in the first stanza, and it still fits with bronze feeling cold to the touch plus, it is colder in the mountains than down in the flatlands. :-)

      • I live in Montana, 70 miles from Yellowstone, and common sense will tell you that only a complete madman will venture out into the Rockies around Yellowstone during winter. The “worth the cold” clue relates to the fact that anywhere in the Rockies, during June thru September, 5000 or 7000 feet above sea level, it can and does get quite cold, when the weather changes unexpectedly. This is true for Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and even New Mexico. In the higher mountains of NM and Arizona you can start out
        at 95 degrees F, and still encounter a snowstorm
        even in spring and summer.
        Overall then, the point is, be dressed and equipped accordingly, because no treasure is worth freezing your butt off, or your ears, or whatever body parts you happen to want to get rid off.

  94. Hey everyone,
    I am Josh and I live in Helena Montana. I was recently intorduced to Forrest Fenn’s book and his treasure hunt. I have always been fond of treasure. I have a small gold placer spot I work and I have been to over 500 historical mines around Montana. I spend much of the summer looking for gems; sapphires, rubies, beryl. I also participate in archaeological programs like the PIT. I love the outdoors!! I am also getting an education in geology.

    I own the new book too far to walk and I love it. He writes fromt he heart, which in my opinion is often hard due to the fact that the hand cannot kep up with the heart and mind, but Forrest executes it with extreme precision. Reading his short stories makes me feel like I was there, I will now forever carry these thoughts with me. It is odd that until recent I had never heard of Fenn and after such an odd intoduction (through book) realized I had such a similar interest.

    I certainly have my opinions as to where the treasure might be. Deep inside i keep an honest word of wisdom….Gold is where you find it. ITs vauge but its honest in all acounts. In my opinion the poem is written wit the same wordplay but a more formable sense of direction.

    I am equipped this year with a go-pro to film my back country adventures. Though many of my spots I want to look for the treasure this season do not allow mineral collection, I do plan on trying a couple with some near by mines!! Always a treat. I am hoping to get a black bear encounter on film, get some great fishing in, find some amazing crystals and gold….and maybe even a treasure chest full of beauty! If I found the box I think I would pass on Forrest’s tradition, with his permission of course! I would find a great way to help fund education in historical sciences and follow my dreams of being a professional geologist/Mineralogist always searching a new mountain or cave for a vug of gemmy crystals!!

    thanks Fenn for intensifying my thrill of the chase!!

    Good luck to everyone! and be safe out there!!

  95. Hi, Josh
    We have a couple of friends in Helena (and I haven’t mentioned the Chase to them). I’m so jealous of your proximity to the hidden gems and nuggets! It’s relative, of course, but even if it’s in New Mexico you’re a lot closer.
    I look forward to seeing your pics and hearing your tales. Just don’t actually find it, okay? I might get back to Montana by fall…..

    • Reading the books, I believe he has choosen a spot that defines himself, his memoirs (ones that are good not war) and someplace with solitude, where few people go….NM has been explored and explored…to risky plus too many people….he needs to be able to check on his hidden chest…Montana has airstrips in the middle of nowhere…and his plane could land on them…just food for thought =)

  96. I have always leaned more towards searching only in NM, but have recently learned more interesting facts that have been luring me more northward… The ideas and comments set forth here on this blog have seriously been a non factor in my thinking… I will say that there sure are some very imaginative ideas being tossed about . The poem has sent a slew of searchers just about everywhere all over the Rockies. Crazy how each idea leads each searcher in so many different directions… Come on snow, MELT…

    • I am a non-violent person, but if ANYONE says it is too hot this summer, I may punch them in the face! Lat’s all say it together…Melt*Melt*Melt. ¥Peace¥

  97. The snow won’t be melting in WY any time soon. It’s zero at the airport with a 22 mph wind out of the NW. We may get above zero on Saturday. This is the worse winter we’ve had in years. The mtns in the southern part of the state probably have more snow than YNP. But the schools are open…we’re tough!

        • They’ll begin plowing the roads to open the East and South entrances in late April. They’ll start the same process in the south central part of the state. Since there rarely any “news” in WY, they’ll tell us when they start and finish. It will be at least 2+ months. I’ll let everyone know when that happens.

  98. That warming spring air and the spring run off rushing down the mountains is calling… Sometime soon, things will start that subtle change process and before long things will begin to liven up right where many hikers and searchers long to be…

    • Nice job on your thoughts! Keep your chin up and hit that canyon soon. Come back and tell of your stories or of the chest! I wish you luck. And never mind the the nay sayers – Every sucessfull person will tell you they all had people that said they could not do it or it was a horrible idea! I just like the fact you had guts to come and tell your story. Hope to see ya out there Adam!

    • Dave, if you are heading all the way up to your blaze, realize it is almost a 1000 ft elevation gain and 3.5 miles each way with no trails, just rugged nature. May want to consider if an 80 yr old could do that carrying 25 lbs 2x. Even with a trail, this would be a very difficult hike, especially with the high elevation and thin air as compared to the relative low lands of Tennessee.
      Also with your blaze, consider how it might look if the sun were at a different angle, the f might not be so apparent or f like.

  99. He was on another site selling this as well and was shot down.

    Whats the snow and ice like in W. Yellowstone? Anybody…

    • We just got another hit last weekend. Today is forecasted for more snow…I am sitting at about 4800 feet and there is no snow here, but our valley creates interesting inversions. I am thinking it will be well into june before we get the chance to play…

  100. JUNE!!!! wow that just stinks! I was reviewing some pics I took in April and May when I was searching a year or so ago and was sure hoping for the same. Wait and see huh. Thanks Josh

  101. Either they don’t want fisherman coming there or they figure they can sell less and still come out ahead… I was thinking a 3 day license.

    • You guys should read the book Collapse by Jared Diamond. It really helps people understand why things in Montana are more expensive. Montana is known as being a resource island. We have a very low populous because there really is no industry here and most business fails. Montana’s primary income is federal aid and they minor exports we have. Timber is declined tremendously due to the slow growing trees and mining has left scars that no person can fix so the mining indusrty has also halted considerably.
      Fresh, running water only makes up .2% of the non-saline waters supplies. Montana, being a massive state, is home to five large rivers, several smaller riveres, and an abundence of streams. Montana had around five native fish, and now hosts dozens of non-native species. Transported in by sport fishermen many non-native species now inundate the waterbodies. This along with the dozens of dieseases that have been spread make fishing in Montana a seriously dellicate resource. The problem most noticed by avid flyfishers is the fact that the waterbodies fill up quick. The smith river for instance is home to the best trout fishing in America, permits are limited and quickly fill.
      For the most part, Montana has really nothing to share with the rest of America but a small taste of rue wilderness, and the ideas that man needs very little to survive. We are one of the last places in America with good water, and we need to keep it that way. Montana’s water supplies the large aquafers of the Mid-west. Our staple food supply of grains.
      Best of luck on your fishing, if you cant catch a fish here your first hour out…something is terribly wrong! =)

  102. Well Josh I guess you have a point there. I learned something today, thanks. If it ever does take me longer than an hour to catch a fish I will give it up. HA!

  103. I don’t know where to post this, but I read a while back that the Yellowstone Grizzlies are coming out of hibernation. They usually find winter kill to feed on and they are very grouchy, Use extreme caution. If you are going to the Park you would be well-advised to talk with the Park Rangers about any warnings. Of course all mountain areas around the Park have bears.

    • Mike, you are correct. There are several bear management areas in YS. Most are open the Friday of Memorial Day weekend. That gives the bears time to eat and have some private time. Believe it or not, Grizzlies are the only bear that does not lose weight during hibernation. That is because they “false hibernate”. They will wake up in the middle of their sleep, eat, then sleep again. Unlike the blackbears. Grizzlies also have their cubs sooner than blacks because they wake up sooner and ” take care of business”. And, of course, they are the most formidable of mothers. After her cubs are three months old, she leads them to higher elevations, usually above 7,000 ft. Blacks like the lower elevations for rearing their young, food is more readily available. Grizzlies rely on their speed for hunting. Black bears have some speed, but are also notorious scavangers. Be safe! ¥Peace¥

      • Since we are on the subject, years ago i heard a hunting outfitter tell friend that he would not allow any pork in camp. He talked about a woman who was killed had her food hanging on a rope between two trees. In the pack was a half-eaten ham sandwich. The bear ate her mouth area. I guess she had ham breath. Many people who survive an attack said they only saw a blur out the corner of their eye. If a bear is 100 yards away and you are near a tree, you might have enough time to climb it, or not.

        While mountain lions rarely attack humans, their kill rate on four-legged animals is 85%.

        Wolves are the ones that concern me. A can of pepper spray is not going to go too far against a pack. Some matrial arts guy thought he could fight off two police attack dogs. He made it about five seconds before they had him down.

        Be careful out there and take someone along with you.

    • People who hunt bears are cowards…there is never a reason to hunt a bear but for survival. They are beautiful creatures, and mean no harm. People who are paranoid of bears carry huge guns for no reason…haha Ive been carrying a simply bear spray for years walked the wilderness dozens of times without any so called protection at all. People are something to fear, bears are something beautiful to watch!

      • that makes me want to hug a tree and eat a buffalo burger on a bear rug. You’re more than welcome to join me Josh if your out my way looking for the treasure. Oh, I catch fish too .

      • I shot a deer one time. I enjoyed eating the meat. The rancher had sixty deer eating his haystack. I’ve never had the urge to shoot another one. Watching a mother deer and her fawn playing in a mountain meadow just makes it hard for me to even think about doing something like that again.

    • My brother-in-law bagged a griz in Canada. I asked him, “Did you use a bow?” He about choked, “No!!!” LOL

      I’ve read reports on mountain lion attacks. No matter what the other person did, the cat was unfazed. It just held on. One guy shot one and the ninth slug luckily hit it in the spine. One guy the cat had his skull and he still remembered to gouge it’s eyes. He stuck his fist into it’s mouth to prevent it from biting down harder.

      i know some people are thinking I am posting this to scare them away. That’s not my intentions. I’m posting my fears and concerns. I just want people to be aware.

  104. When I was a young and fearless thrill seeker I flew hang gliders and paragliders for twenty years. I loved to go camping and never worried about any bears. I guess now I realize I am mortal. Now I just work with my dowsing rod for excitement.

    • Pretty much immune to the naysayers, but like everyone I have my weak times. I’ve learned not to try and convince them of anything.

  105. I know a lady that lives in the bootheel of Missouri, Granny Duncan, she uses a dowsing rod to look for water. I have seen the rod move before we are 50ft from the water site. I wonder if she wants to come with me looking for bronze?! Lol! Hum…¥Peace¥

    • If it was easy it would have been found already. I have to believe most people don’t have a clue how difficult it is. There are about 2.6 million square yards in a square mile. Just one quad topo map has about fifty square miles. That’s almost the same odds as winning the Powerball jackpot. Better solve the poem first, then call in the locator. Yes, I would say dowsing is a miracle, but even miracles have their limits.

      • My math was a little off. Actually over 3 million square yards per square mile. What’s a few hundred thousand more?

  106. Also, gang, I will still monitor my fav sites, but it’s all business now.
    My next door neighbor, 41, Jim, died of a major heart attack. Just keeled over. His wife, Shannon has MS and in a wheelchair. They have 5 kids. Now, they may lose their home. The future for the kids looks bleak. Shannon is poss facing a nursing home now. The family may be ripped apart. Child prot services already visited, that quick. I think the cops called them. My heart goes out to them. He hand no retirement because he had to care for his wife, he loved her so much. My main purpose of finding the chest was to help finance Reservation schools with updated teaching equipment, and buses. Now, this goes on the list.
    Game over now! It’s all business with a dire purpose. I’ve GOT to help the kids and my neighbors. These challenges are fueling my drive and deep focus.
    I pray to the powers that be, that they give me the wisdom and intelligence to retrieve the chest. Saving the quality of lives is the only treasure reward I want.
    Stay safe all. ¥Peace¥

  107. Uh oh.I just realized what I did. F put up an email from gypsy that showed a pic from crazy woman creek in Wy. Crazy Woman mountain is in Mt. That’s where Half Moon Canyon is.. You got one week Montana.. You too Dal.

  108. What I mean to say, is that I know Crazy Woman Creek sign is on the side of the interstate between Casper and Buffalo.It never occurred to me about the Crazy Mountains,Tongue River, Half Moon Canyon. Your pic was in Wyoming. Half Moon and the rest are in Montana.I just find it interesting the pic of Crazy Woman. By the way, great fishing in Buffalo. Only draw back. Antelope big as a moose. Hit one. Thank you Farm Bureau!!!

  109. Whats the snow situation in W.Yellowstone these days? Lakes iced out yet? Snow on the ground won’t do you a bit of good. IMHO.

  110. I talked to a guy with his school-aged son day before yesterday.He had Nevada plates and was headed to Red Lodge, MT. It sounded like he was planning to go over the Beartooth Highway. He said he was going to drive the Park loop. I told him that highway won’t open until Memorial Day or maybe later. I heard they were starting to plow the Sunlight Basin road (Chief Joseph Highway) had 27 foot drifts. If you are planning a trip you might want to check road conditions first. Someone said there was 20 feet of snow at Cook City, that they got five feet this last storm.

      • We used to go to West Yellowstone and the Park to celbrate the Fourth of July most years. I recall seeing signs on the roof tops in West that said “Do not walk on roof!” It took me a while to figure out why anyone would put such a goofy sign on the roofs then it dawned on me that in the Winter months the snow is so deep it comes right up to the roof tops.

        Well, since I am rambling here, I recall fifty years ago my parents took the family to the Park. We came upon several cars stopped along the roadside and there were several Grizzly bears begging to be fed. At the time it was a common occurrence to feed them. One Grizzly came right up to our car and put both paws on the car at the back window. Our dog had it’s teeth hitting against the window in an attempt to get at the bear. The bear was not even fazed.

        • The thought just occurred to me some people may have such a crazed Fenn fever they ignore any bear warnings after reading my last post. If you fit ito this category, please go see a psychiatrist immediately.

          I heard another story on the Gallatin (sp?) river someone found an orphaned black bear cub and raised it as a pet. One day a small girl was killed by it.

          I’ve also heard of people putting honey on their child’s hand so they could get photos of a bear licking their hand. Please refer to first paragraph.

          • As we were driving out of Yosemite,we saw some guy holding out a hot dog bun to a Black bear. Never did find out if the bear tried to eat the hand too. Even deer can be dangerous. A child was gored in Yosemite when a deer wanted more potato chips after the child stopped feeding them to it. :-( Wild animals are called “wild” for a reason.

  111. Yes, I was one of those kids In Jellystone park . That was feeding bears from the roadside. And they almost got me. Very close escape. Than later as a teen and later as an Adult I was chased by Bears and injured falling trying to escape. Lost a tent and it ate all my food, more a few times this happened to me. I think Forrest said carry a sandwich so if you encounter a bear you toss it to him and get away. I know you are not suppose to run. But not many people will fall down and play dead, and I did not. I was Lucky on too to be able to jump in a car or trailer. IN Montana and Wyoming.

    Lou Lee Belle-Chased by Brown Bears.

    • Sorry I can help myself with my ramblings. My grandfather used to tell the story of he and his brother fishing. They were maybe a quarter-mile apart on a stream when the brother saw a bear. As he was moving to get away, his pants got caught on a short branch and he thought the bear had him. LOL My grandfather said he heard the yell and within seconds the brother had run to him. He said it would have been a track and field record.

      Yes, I like the sandwich idea.

    • Bears have an excellent sense of smell. I wouldn’t carry a sandwich, and advertise it to every bear within smell shot. A person is better off carrying bear spray at the ready, and making sure they’re not wearing clothing which isn’t fresh and may have scent of foods from prior meals.

  112. Thanks for the link camperguy. I’m hoping for Memorial Day. I’ve hunted and fished all my life, plenty of bear encounters so I know of bears. Wolves are a different story. Never had that encounter ….yet.

  113. I was just north of Gardiner at Sphinx Creek where I met two campers who live not too far from there. They were father and son getting away from the city as they put it. The Father never gave his name but he said he had been attacked by a bear and he had the scars to prove it, which he showed me. He shot the bear on her second attack in the eye and then collapsed. The bear died and he was close to death himself by time his son got him to the hospital.

    The two were doing some fishing and looking for colored glass, chars and agate. I saw some bear turds on the Sphinx trail about a half mile up from the trailhead but never saw a bear. This area is a historians smorgage board. Train tracks of old (the tracks that brought President Roosevelt to Yellowstone) the first road to the area ( where Yankee Jim charge the wagons to pass) and the trail used for thousands of years by the natives. There is a near by Native American campsite used by the American Indians as a stop on the way to collect obsidian. The area also has a few dumpsites containing old glass bottles and cans.

    Can you beat this place for being something special? I can’t. A boy could hunt artifacts, look for semiprecious stones, explore old dumpsites, hike the trails and fish the yellowstone all from this one area.
    I did not go into the Park but on April 18 I spent a warm birthday hiking the area and got a light tan. No snow on the ground and lots of wildlife along the highway.

    If by chance you thought I just gave away this place you need to know that last summer the area had a lot of treasure hunters there, it is far from being a secret. The two men I talked to had seen many searchers in their previous trips to the site. I thought I might be one of the few lucky ones to get here first but I am a johnny come lately.

    If you do decide to look in the area be aware of bears and be very aware of mountain rattlesnakes. I did not see any but the two campers warned me to be careful.

    • If they don’t get another Northerner blown in, just patchy. My cuz lives in Atlantic City WY and said he will head up there just before the weekend to check for us, too. I will post a response by Thursday! ¥Peace¥

      • I have some gold claims at about 7,000 feet that are still buried in about 10 feet of snow. I am snowshoeing in this weekend to get exact depths. Snowmobiles are having a hard time due to how sloppy it is. Montana recieved record snowfall this season so that the aquafiers would get a fixin….we are drying up our water supplies tooo fast!!! I can tell you that the webcams still show huge amounts of snow from Mt. Washburn facing south into the park!

      • Donna, your friend must be one of about 50 people that live in Atlantic City. I was through there a few years ago on a job and stayed at the Miner’s Delight Inn. Great place to stay but I missed the whiskey tasting they have once a month or so.

  114. Maybe its not for nothing that Nov /Jan/ Feb/ Mar/ are not in the PostMarks, and Dec is in Nam. Just breezing thru, maybe I missed something.

  115. Thanks Donna for the info. I do look at the live cams of Yellowstone, but for me it’s kinda tough to tell how deep it is. I’m not searching IN YNP, just close.

  116. Thats all thats left!!!!! Wow! Guess I’ll be picking up the chest end of the month! lol Thanks for sharing CJ.

  117. Sometime I guess I should write an article on the Long Range Locators. That’s my passion. I noticed lately there are many sales of devices on ebay. I suspect these people all have the Fenn fever. I really feel sorry for anyone who is buying these because they pretty much lost their money and time. I tell people do not buy anything of ebay and don’t buy anything that has a control box on a swivel handle. There’s pretty much nothing inside of most of these devices. One device used to stuff a junk circuit board into the device so people would think there was something inside. These devices sell for $500 and more. At best they are poor locators. There are some that work but it takes way more time to learn than most people are lead to believe.

  118. I wonder about “locators”. Seems to me if they worked as well as some say, then FF’s chest as well as other treasures would have been found. I guess that is where my skepticism comes from. Not saying they are all junk just saying why I’m a skeptic.

    • It’s not as easy as people are being lead to believe. For starters the surface area of the target is very much a factor. One gram of gold dust sprinkled over a six foot area will give a stronger signal than a ton of gold in one cube. There is a resonance between the particles. Most have some kind of gimmick they claim will filter out the micro particles.

      Yeah, the stuff on ebay is pretty much worthless. That one popular one has a battery and two or three resistors in it. That’s it and they cost $500. and up. The fancy star wars case is sucker bait. And they are pitiful in performance, just all kinds of false responses.

      Another one has a calculator on top and claims you enter numbers to find a specific target. That’s pretty close to fraud but they use careful wording in the ads. Tell them what they want to hear. The long, drawn-out ads make people’s eyes tired and they become hypnotized into buying. I suspect most people look at the ebay feedback and feel they are safe buying from them. It’s a while after the sale and they’ve already given the feedback before they figure out “they can’t do it”.

      I’m way too embarrassed to say how much I’ve spent on these and how much time.

  119. After all the money I’ve spent, I build and use my own equipment now. I spent $2500 on one unit and never began to pay for itself. And the fancy dowsing rods that go for well over $1000, same thing. Many people who know how to dowse say “a bent coat hanger works just as good”. Of course that is not true with what I use. I got tired of trying to convince these “open-minded” types as they call themselves.

    And speaking of ebay there is another device that goes for $175. It uses a $5 Radio shack part and makes an obnoxious sound. That guy claims it’s “bran new” but it sold in a kit for $10 back in the early 1990’s. There again, phony, misleading ads. I got one way back when and I hated it.

    I’ll post some more on this later.

    • Haha, Ive used some basic dowsing rods and they work just fine…I owned a gold bug and it works great too. Now that I have a positive background in Geomorphology and Earth History I only need a map. Of course for buried treasure this is a bit harder…There is only one Montana Gold Magnet…and I own the shoes!

  120. Well this kinda confirms my suspicions. Do you know of anyone finding a large cache or large nuggets with a locator? Any ways Memorial Day Weekend is almost here, work will wait!! I’m coming for you my bronze beauty!!!

  121. No problem. I’m not here to convince anyone. I made these posts to warn people not to buy the ebay stuff. I also said it takes much longer to learn than what people are being lead to believe. When I get some time i will post some info on this subject.

  122. To paraphrase what a master dowser wrote: Start at age five and practice every healthy day. By the time you are thirty years old you will have reached your plateau. That does not mean you will be a good dowser. It depends on how much you put into it.

  123. My buddy and I have a dozen or so historical books on Yellowstone, some dating back to the turn of the century…famous writings about the trappers and miners of the park. I have one place that i just have to go that has treasures new and old!

    • Yeah, I start to wonder if those people broke the law intentionally so only criminals will be searching in the park. You know, keep the honest people out.

    • That’s probably because he thinks you’ll bring your pirate ship to fish off of. I mean, off of which to fish.

  124. Hi all you treasure seekers, just wondering if anyone can tell me where the “Totem Cafe” was located in West Yellowstone?

    • It’s still there. On Canyon St. ‘Take it in the canyon down’. ;)

      Close to Buckaroos and the DQ. Look it up on google!

      • Thanks. I had searched for it on Google maps and it didn’t find it. I just needed a regular Google search.

      • Sunshine reservoirs are two warm waters in Meeteetse and a place they don’t have dams is Sunshine creek where it halts at the Wood River I believe….or maybe it turns into Ripshaw creek I think….can’t remember, but it does pass the Wood River.

    • I posted today, July 27, 2014 at 9:32 am on this site what I believe to be some helpful answers to clues which if followed will lead to the treasure in Colorado. Please check it out.

        • You can either read the last 20 scrapbooks on this here website or use the search field down by Dal’s face with cipher as the keyword- no offense, but I got things to do and I ain’t doing your research for you ;)

          • Thought that was what you were referring to. No offense, but I don’t agree with your interpretation.

          • None taken. I just thought it was one of FF’s more straightforward posts. (While he didn’t cite anagrams or acrostics specifically, I think he would’ve , were not for the fact these can be made to fit, like astrology horoscopes, even after the treasure chest is found.) Carry on though!!

            ” Knowing about head pressures, foot pounds, acre feet, bible verses, Latin, cubic inches, icons, fonts, charts, graphs, formulas, curved lines, magnetic variation, codes, depth meters, riddles, drones or ciphers, will not assist anyone to the treasure location”

  125. He also stated that he loves changing words around in a sentence, It makes him smile. He states that he makes up his own words that defy the dictionary. It just so happens that all three of the hints above are within a 20 mile radius where brown mountain is.

    • I posted today, July 27, 2014 at 9:32 am on this site what I believe to be some helpful answers to clues which if followed will lead to the treasure in Colorado. Please check it out.

  126. He has also stated several times ” Don’t mess with my poem”. What does he mean by that? Up to each to cipher the meanings he states.

  127. Does anyone think Oregon is a possibility? Would anyone consider Oregon as North of Sante Fe? Email me if you do.

    • Carol Kelderman – The special map Mr. Fenn had designed and included in “Too Far To Walk” doesn’t include Oregon. I’m certain the only remaining states which qualify on the map and in taped interviews are: NM, CO, WY & MT (including Yellowstone National Park, and other national parks.)

      *Check out Dals resources or google Forrest Fenn’s map on line to view the highlighted Rocky Mountain states he designated.

      • Just to underline the point, the recent (May) backpacker magazine article also confirmed these four states as the only remaining targets.

  128. FYI for searchers going to YNP. From a news release:

    “Firehole Lake Drive in Yellowstone National Park has been temporarily closed due to a damaged road surface.

    Extreme heat from surrounding thermal areas has caused thick oil to bubble to the surface, damaging the blacktop and creating unsafe driving conditions on the popular, scenic road, located off the Grand Loop Road halfway between Old Faithful and Madison Junction in the park’s Lower Geyser Basin.”

    http://www.nps.gov/yell/parknews/14045.htm

    • We all know that searchers dug up the ground so much around Firehole that we caused it…at least we’re getting smarter and the Rangers “think” they know what happened…..

  129. I will be in West Yellowstone area on July 23rd for a couple of days. If anyone else is around there at that time and wants to chat about treasure, please let me know.

    I hope to be hiding a new little cache..not in the park this time… for us to play with..Take something/leave something..
    The last cache was there for two years but “disappeared” this past spring..
    The story and directions to the “now missing” little cache is here:
    http://dalneitzel.com/2013/06/20/dals_yellowstone_cache/

    • Sounds great Dal that you’ll be placing a new cache somewhere…Hope I get the chance to check it out later…Will look for notification you have placed it and directions/co-ordinates…Thanks for the heads up on this little side adventure…

    • Awesome – I too have placed a treasure/cache in the Rockies, inspired by the chase. Been working on a poem to go with, but it sits out there waiting. Includes worthless geegaws, sentimental value items, and actual rare coins and jewelry including rings and pearls.
      The hiding place is just as tricky as FF’s. ;)

        • Thanks, hunter (though my cache is in a plastic container, not a metal Romanesque chest ;) and is maybe worth 3 figures rather than 6 or 7 )

    • Ya got trouble, folks, right here in River City
      with a capital ‘T’ and that rhymes with ‘P’ and that
      stands for ‘postponement’

      I have to postpone my trip out to Fenn Haven land for awhile…and I am not happy about it..

      Just call me Harold..

      • Dal, just wanted to make sure you and your family are all ok…trouble with a capital T in River City doesn’t sound like fishing the Madison.

      • I hope it isn’t because of all of the forrest fires in Washington. Sounds like ya’ll are getting a pounding up there. We are planning to head up to Gallatin/West Yellowstone next month. It would be great to meet you if you are there. Best wishes.

      • Dang, I was looking forward to hearing another of your entertaining adventures! Hope all is well with you and your family. Tell us why you have to postpone your trip – “Enquiring minds want to know”. :-)

      • It’s nothing serious. The “character” I was hoping to meet out there and write about was arrested last night in a “pool hall fight” and has a court date next week. Everyone is fine. Minor lacerations and a few broken bottles and glasses. It is likely that she will see a little jail time in Wyoming…again. We’ll just wait and see how things pan out with her. You’ll like her. She’s a good natured, red headed, rodeo cowgirl with a spicy temper on a short fuse.
        The bigger issue for me is work related. Extra events that cannot be easily put off were added to the schedule here and that makes leaving much more difficult.
        Between the two I’m just going to postpone until I can see daylight again..

        • Sounds like you will have quite the adventure when you finally do meet up with her! Looking forward to hearing all about it. :-)

        • Well, FWIW, it works for me. Sounded like you might be near earthquake lake… And the longer you put off that, the better. Just saying. ;)

        • Dal,

          I will be in Montana this coming Monday through Friday. I usually visit the West Yellowstone
          Community. This will be my 9th trip. I would have gladly met you in West Yellowstone for a great chat. I will be in the Mountains North of Hebgen
          and eating 3 babe ruth candy bars with my 23 year old son for back up.
          I look forward to meeting you in the not to far to walk future.

          Wishing you good hunting.

          Doug

  130. Fellow FF enthusiasts

    I am confident that the area I am searching is correct. Each part of the poem fell into place beautifully as I got closer to the area I believe that FF left his box. My last issue is the blaze…
    What I have so far:
    Lots of cottonwood trees that are ALL blazed by beavers. Since the poem should hold strong to the location in a 1000 years, this blaze theory must be incorrect, and it is also too vague.
    I am on a river.
    Considered High Water Mark to be the blaze…

    My question:

    What type of blazes have people found? What other meanings or definitions of the word ‘blaze’ have people come across?
    I am fresh out of ideas.

    I am confident that the area I am searching is where the treasure is. I have it narrowed down to about a 400yd radius but cannot solve the last clue.

    Help appreciated!

  131. Try the stars he talks about that in His book. I think we are all stuck on the blaze . wise = sage = sagebrush that could be considered as Underwood shrubs that are smaller than a tree and surrounds trees

    Sage is a person of profound wisdom .

    Good luck maybe others will offer some advice :)

  132. I firmly believe (at this particular time) that the blaze is identified in the poem somehow, and if we are wise we will identify the blaze, (in addition to the geographic location we are to “look quickly down” from), before we ever leave the house. I believe, at the very least, the poem gives us directions to the blaze, and we must “locate” the treasure from there.

    I am still looking for solid directional clues “hidden” somehow within the framework of the poem. For example, “Begin it where warm waters halt” could be interpreted as Begin it at the sea, which in turn could be interpreted as Begin it at the C. This is the “family” of strategies I believe must exist within the text. I can coax CIMIRRON out of the second stanza if I use the “I’s” from the first stanza. Spelling is wrong but you know what it says, right? These are the thoughts and chores that I love to plague myself with.

    If we think logically for a moment, Forrest placed the chest in such a manner that nobody is going to happen upon it. This means if you aren’t LOOKING for the chest, you aren’t going to find it. It follows then, that the poem MUST divulge SPECIFIC directions to locate the chest. So, at the very least, the BLAZE MUST be identified in the poem. Let’s pretend for a moment the entire poem is literal, I don’t believe that, but for arguments sake…WWWH is some arbitrary special place to FF….as is the canyon down, and the distance modifier, but home of Brown?? That needs to be a specific location. The blaze lies somewhere below there. Guessing at matches is not going to get the job done. It’s fun, and I have done my fair share of it…but IMO it is not the correct approach. If there’s a key word, and a word that is key, and good maps are important, and thinking and planning and going with confidence is required, then there must exist another message within the poem…a more literal direction of the treasure location, I am not saying I have discovered the right one, but I have discovered many….It is amazing what a determined imagination can pull off….Here’s to hoping one of these days, someone hits the right combination of imagination and knowledge, and discovers what we all only imagine is there.

  133. I’m leaving in 5 minutes to go on my 17th and final treasure hunting trip that has taken place over the last year and a half. Because this has consumed my life, if I don’t find the treasure this trip, when I get back I will share on this site everything I have learned about the clues and where I think the treasure is located. I emailed Forrest last year after one of my trips and he actually replied within 45 minutes. I will included a copy of that email along with everything else I believe to be the answers to the clues. I’m at the point where I just want the treasure found by anyone so I can move onto something else in my life. I just need to know where it is and I hope that it is found soon. Good luck to all those who are out there chasing the clues.

  134. Okay treasure hunters, as promised, I said I would reveal my clues if I didn’t find the treasure on my latest hunt. I don’t really want to stop my search or reveal my best kept secrets, but I need to move on with my life. The only way for me to do that is for the treasure to be found.

    The following is what I know to be true and what I believe to be the answers to the clues.

    Clue #1 “Put in below the home of Brown”
    Answer: Brown Mountain.

    The only word in the poem that could be the name of a mountain where the treasure is hidden is the word “Brown”. Forrest said on the Today show, “The word Brown is the most important clue in the poem”.

    Clue #2 “…wise and found the blaze”
    Answer: Trail, play on trailblazer.

    I believe there is a secret website written by Forrest with pictures and a treasure map. Check out: http://www.narrowgauge.org/4×4/html/brown_mountain.html
    This site was written by Miles A. Lumbard which I believe is a play on Forrest’s name, miles of lumber. The website has a map with a trail highlighted and 14 pictures of the location on Brown Mountain in Colorado. To me, the author sounds like Forrest because he talks about dreams and golden eagles. He also used the word “anyway” a few times in his writing. More about this website further down.

    Clue #3 “Look quickly down”
    Answer: Scroll down the page.

    On the secret website, there is a picture of a building that when I was walking through it reminded me of the description that Forrest wrote about of his childhood home. The bedroom without heat next to the kitchen, the sitting room he talks about, etc. are all in this building. I printed out the map from the website on a 2’ x 2’ paper, and hung it on a cork board. During my search, I placed around 20 pins on locations where I believed the treasure to be hidden on Brown Mountain. During my 17 trips over the last 18 months, I searched each location one by one.

    Clue #4 “No paddle up your creek”
    Answer: Pond with floating log.

    On page 34 of “Thrill of the Chase” there is a picture of Forrest as a child sitting on a log in a pond holding a paddle. On the website for Brown Mountain there is a picture of a pond at the top of the trail with a log floating in the water. I’ve searched this pond and no treasure was found, only a floating log.

    Clue #5 “…warm waters halt”
    Answer: Hot springs.

    Fifty miles south of Brown Mountain, there is a natural hot springs along the road where people stop at all day long. Also, 9 miles north of Brown Mountain in Ouray, Colorado, there is a large hot springs where people bathe in all year round. Also, during the winter people come from all over the U.S. to climb the frozen waterfalls in the area.

    Clue #6 “tarry scant with marvel gaze”
    Answer: Remain slight with wonderful watch? WHAT? This is the best answer I can come up with for this clue.

    Page 64 there is a picture of Skippy in his car with the caption “the grin is real’. Looking closely at the picture, you can tell that the picture is photo shopped. Not sure what this has to do with anything but it is clearly a fake.

    Clue #7 “worth the cold”
    Answer: It rains and snows all of the time on Brown Mountain.

    Clues #8 & #9: If you can fill in these blanks, you should be able to find the treasure.

    Last year, after my 10th treasure hunting trip, I came home and emailed Forrest about searching Brown Mountain in Colorado and told him what I believed to be the answer to the clues. Maybe there is some kind of clue in his reply. The following is a copy of his email:

    “Roy,
    I am glad you are seeing positive results as a result of your failure to find the treasure. It is because of people like you that I hid it in the first place. The fresh mountain air seems to have cleared your mind. Good luck to you sir.
    Forrest”

    What I find curious, is that Forrest talks about New Mexico, Wyoming and Montana a lot in his book, but never says one word about Colorado. Looking at the treasure map in Forrest’s new book “Too Far to Walk”, all 4 states on the map have Brown Mountains. I do not believe the treasure to be in New Mexico because the Brown Mountain there is below Santa Fe. I do not believe the treasure is hidden in Montana because the Brown Mountain there is not very high. I do not believe that he hid the treasure on Brown Mountain in Wyoming even though the “Wood” River runs below the mountain there. I’ve searched the Wood River twice but could not find anything else in the area to fit the clues. The mountain is south of “Cody” Wyoming and a hour and a half from Yellowstone National Park but feels too obvious of a location for the treasure to be hidden there. With all this being said, if I were to hide a treasure and then leave clues to where it is located, I wouldn’t constantly talk about the state it was in.

    One last comment, on page 32/33 of “Thrill of the Chase” there is a picture of him playing marbles with 3 square dots, for marbles, in a triangle formation. On the map on the secret website of Brown Mountain, there are the same 3 square dot triangle formations. Everything to me that I have seen and research points to Brown Mountain in Colorado.

    I started my search for the treasure because when I was a child I collected coins and always wanted a golden eagle coin. The treasure has 265 of them so I couldn’t resist trying to find it. I hope that what I have revealed here will help you in your search. If you have any questions along the way, please feel free to contact me and I will do my best to help if I can. Good luck to all of those of you who are searching and I hope you find the treasure soon.

    Roy

    • By the way, I doubt this is the case, but if any of those double eagles are 1933’s, those are worth about 9 million dollars EACH.

        • Not that I expect a 33 is in there. FF would be too proud and would brag, I’d think — 33’s were snuck out of the mint, so a truly special rarity. No, I have several little factoids banked. Like Dal, I was trying to counter- stir the pot.

    • Roy-
      There are 256 gold coins but not all of them are eagles or double eagles. Many are modern gold coins.Forrest told us that. None-the less…I’ll bet there are plenty of eagles to play with…

    • Roy, enjoyed reading about Brown mountain and your search. Could you tell me which Today Show Fenn said Brown was the most important clue, I don’t recall him saying that. That would certainly be an important clue and should go on the cheat sheet.

      I enjoyed reading about C.W. McCall, all the jeep trail trips, and the narrow gauge circle. I’ve driven many of those trails over the years in the San Juan Mountains. Lots of fun and lots of history. But I don’t think Miles A. Lumbard is Fenn. Here’s his story and a picture of him with C.W. McCall.

      http://www.narrowgauge.org/4×4/cw_pages/html/who_why.html

      I suppose we could just email him and ask him if he’s Fenn; I wonder if he’s looking for the treasure?

      campbird@norfolk.infi.net

      • It was in February 2013, either the first time when he was talking about the poem or the second time when he gave clue number 10.

      • I would suggest that everyone email this Miles Lumbard and ask him if he is Forrest. If you look at the picture on the page of the link above that you posted, the picture is not of CW McCall, just three men that could be anyone. The article never tells you who is in the picture. Here’s what I know: if you are going to be successful at magic you need to have a good slight of hand. While you are being told to look here, the “magic” is happening elsewhere. Forrest talks about Wyoming a lot and two of the clues seems to point to Brown Mt and the Wood River in Wyoming, but for my money, the “magic” is taking place in Colorado where hardly anyone is looking. How many of you have been to and searched Wyoming and have also had boots on the ground in Colorado? I think the answer to that will surprise you. Read “Thrill of the Chase” again and then read the link on: http://www.narrowgauge.org/4×4/html/brown_mountain.html and then tell me this is not Forrest pulling off a magic trick. I know in my gut that Forrest wrote this link, maybe to mislead some of us or just maybe because this is where the treasure is hidden. Too many things on this link, that was written more than three years ago, fits the clues for it to be a simple accident. I’ve spent a lot of time on Brown Mt in Colorado and have seen all kinds of animals, including a chubby bear running across the road but I have never seen any of the “Golden Eagles high above the ridge” as described by this Miles Lumbard. In fact, I’ve never seen a single bird there. Is it too high for birds? Why even talk about eagles? I don’t know, all I know is that my gut tells me the treasure is hidden in Colorado and that this link is a clue to finding the treasure. I hope someone finds the treasure soon so I can get some rest and move on to something else.

        • Roy, I’m not picking on you…….really I’m not. You’ve got some good ideas and could be absolutely correct…….But I don’t agree (for now) with your gut.

          I reread the Brown Mountain story and I honestly don’t see the story being written by Fenn. Could Fenn have written it under a pen name; sure, anything is possible. But I don’t see the similarities in writing style you do.

          I emailed Miles Lumbard and ask him if he was Fenn…….should he actually return an email to a guy named goofy asking him if he hid a treasure in the Rockies and he denied being Fenn would you believe him?

          I’ve explored the San Juan Mountains extensively over the years just because it’s a great area to explore. It was one of the areas that immediately came to mind when I first read the poem; along with Browns canyon in southern Colorado and many more. I just couldn’t make all the clues fit. Of course that could mean I’m just not smart enough to figure them out.

          Also, I’ve rewatched all the Today Show clues and I couldn’t find where he said Brown was the most important clue……If he said that it would be a big clue, can you remember where else you might have heard that?

          • He may have said think big when you think of brown and then later recanted that statement. I haven’t looked for the actual statements – just from my memory.

    • Wyoming has amelia and sunshine creek too by brown mountain. Dont think going down wood was what you would do. Someone told me a great “home” for brown there too, but wasn’t the mountain. Might want to look around that area more. Best hiding spot is sometimes right in front of you.

  135. The thing you have to ask yourself is why would this place be special to Forrest. I’ve studied that area and just don’t see it.

    • I think it could be special to Forrest because it is stuck in the old times. The area is beautiful, has tons of waterfalls, fishing holes and the highway that runs along the mountain was named million dollar highway because they took out a million dollars worth of silver from the Brown Mt area years ago. I think it would be the perfect place to put back a treasure in a place where some many have taken from in the past. It’s also a very romantic place.

        • Be glad to answer any questions you may have on here. I want to be fair and share equally with everyone. The more people working together, the better chance we all have of this treasure being found in our life time. I won’t be able to rest in my grave until I find out where this was hidden. This is the only place that I’m sharing so I hope the person that will eventually find the treasure is using this site.

  136. I bet the rangers are searching at night with a metal detector I bet they are trying to figure the poem out as well but in that being said they are so Lost :) !!!!!

    • That might be interesting. The only thing that concerns me is that I think I have a solid solution. Once again, that is only what I think. It could be wrong, but it feels so right :-)

      I just need someone (trustworthy) to check my solution for me since I am not able to travel at this time.

        • Not anytime soon. I have a whole list of things preventing me. The only positive is that my company might send me somewhere close, close being a 5-10 hour drive one way, which I would be willing to do to see the mountains. But even that would depend on weather and the possibility of an upcoming surgery.

          • I will probably have to wait until next year. I also have a rock solid theory about the location. I am brainstorming now and hoping to find a sooner solution. If you change your mind about talking it over I am ready.

          • If you plan on going out, and I have not looked in my spot, I would be willing to share.

  137. IMO this is Forrest’s way of saying the treasure is not in Yellowstone.

    Your words and actions say you are a friend and lover of the environment “more than most.” Do you follow Leave No Trace and did you while hiding the chest? ie stay on established trails. ~Buddy

    Buddy, I think you’re trying to get me in trouble but that’s where I am most of the time anyway, so I’ll answer your questions.

    You may as well ask me if I love the air. I don’t know but, I certainly am an appreciator of nature. “Leave no trace” is a rhetorical statement not intended to be taken literally. For instance it is not feasible for you to not leave a footprint somewhere or a dry fly snagged high on a tree limb, left by your back cast. But I agree with the philosophy of the phrase. I dislike seeing beer cans scattered around when I am fantasizing that I am the only person who has ever been in that spot.

    Generally speaking, there are places where one should stay on established trails; Yellowstone is one. However, it reminds me of the worn-out axiom, “If you ain’t the lead dog, the scenery never changes.”When I am in the mountains or in the desert, the last place I want to be is on a trail. Ain’t no adventure in that for me. There isn’t a human trail in very close proximaty to where I hid the treasure.f

  138. Anybody got any hot spots in the Cody area? I have the Long Range Locating equipment and about 10,000 hours experience with it over the last thirty-five years.

      • It’ld take me a long time to describe the different devices I have used. The frequency generators I’ve spent more time with. The idea with any dowsing or long range locating device is to excite the target through resonance.You are probably familiar with holding a microphone near a loudspeaker. The feedback becomes almost unbearably loud. These lines of force between the transmitter and the target are detectable with an L-rod and an experienced operator. Of course there’s more to it and it takes more practice than most people are willing to do.

        Been spending most of my practice time with a device I built and have been “fiddling with” on and off for two or three years. It’s not such a fragile (they are all fragile and subtle) signal as the fg’s.

        I thought I had a chance to go to the Cody area tomorrow but it fell through. Still might be able to get there soon if the weather holds up.

  139. Thanks for the info. I figured I’d probably have to go there with whoever had their clues targeted, hopefully within a square mile or less.

      • it’s a bathing pool that used to less known in the park. I’ve been looking at my best architectural theory in a different way, and thought i’d throw it out there. The first words phonetically would be bubble out eight. but i’m thinking it’s too far inside off a road to start.

        • Leigh cramer,

          Mr. Bubbles would be something a child would know of…And remember, The starting point of the poem is not or may not be the ending point where the chest is.

          Do you know how far Mr. bubble is to the rainbow arch? just curious.

          • where is the rainbow arch?

            Mr. Bubble is… a sit-and-soak hot spring the locals call “Mr. Bubble,” accessible from Three Rivers Junction via a short trail along Ferris Fork River.

            I never believed it was in Yellowstone. But I’ve decided to open my mind, cause my mind didn’t place the chest.

  140. I must have the wrong place. The one I looked at said it’s 40 miles one way and you have to sleep over just to get there. The other one was about 17 miles one way.

    • i crossed out Mr. Bubbles, for the reasons you said… and i think i ‘m reading my blaze wrong. I’m looking now south of Butte. Mike(MT) do you live near there?

  141. Just my two zinc cents here. I have a hard time thinking Forrest would hide the cache in a place where the public is not allowed like off trail in the Park. I’m not ready to say it can’t possible be there but I am having a hard time dealing with it.

    • My money’s on Colorado because it seems like no one believes it’s there and that would be a great place to hide it. Colorado is the fourth state on the map. Could be why it has not been found.

  142. Hey everyone its been a long year! Found lots of sapphire and other gemstone this year, did great on gold too!! The search never stops. I hiked several localities around the state and did some amazing historical research. I have found several pieces of evidence that fit several clues but am just now getting around to putting it all together! Hope everyone was safe. I have my fill!!

  143. Hi Jamie Jones, I guess you are way over my head. Found the Ptarmigan but can’t add very well to get to Brown. I’m in Billings. Used to ski there, loved the powder on the North Bowl, and yes it can be extreme cold.

    • I’ve hit some wonderful powder snow at Bridger Bowl. Way back that was the only ski hill around. There used to be a ski jump near the bottom of the hill. Looked like a great big playground slide. One off-season we climbed up on it and dreamed about ski jumping. Only if I was being chased and facing certain death. LOL Anyone know if Forrest is a skier?

      • Soon after that I started Hang Gliding and later paragliding. Back then it was my obsession. Not quite the same as piloting a fighter jet, well okay pretty much exact opposites. A manhole cover is cast iron and weighs about 300 pounds. That’s about the wing loading (pounds per square foot of wing area) of a fighter jet. Now a hang glider has about 170 or more square feet and carries about the same weight (including the pilot) as the manhole cover. My days of hang gliding are long passed. I call it a young-man’s sport but most people flying now learned many years ago. Each year the average age of pilots went up one year. Haven’t been on a paraglider for 20 years. They aren’t as much fun but so much easier to land and a lot less hassle set-up and take-down. There is just something about flying prone like a bird. You get so you forget you have a glider, you just think where you want to go and you go there. Hard to imagine piloting a fighter jet probably the same thing happens.

      • I could certainly see a fighter pilot enjoying skiing.

        But, you know he said he didn’t the idea of ashes being spread over snowfields, so maybe that’s just a red herring, or not. LOL

        • Besides, most ski hills are off-limits. Now you forgot about cross country skis (Nordic). BUt then again, most eighty-year-old’s probably would not mountaineer.

    • Hey Dave, I like that idea it actually really fits with a lot of the clues in the poem… I just don’t think knowing how to ski is required… I hope not it’s been a few years for me…

  144. I agree with you about not having to ski or there would be danger. At least for an old guy like me. Kids do ski though which might be the reason a kid is suggested to be asked and are there not special maps to ski? Correct me if I am wrong. I believe he said something about a certain map or detailed map. Don’t ski hills have ponds below them to create the snow? Wondering about summer events at ski hills. Do people bike them? Maybe ski trail names are named after animals. Jamie was smart in the theme idea. Could be something to it.

  145. Well if sitting by the fire is a clue I’m in…:) But what about in the summer?? So do we sit by the fire in the winter and then go to the ski slopes in the summer??? But then some of the clues don’t fit anymore… Like where warm waters halt = ice, snow freeze… or maybe its by the snow machine???? Hmmm…:)

  146. Here’s something for ‘Team Wyoming’. Did you know there are a little over 62.6 million acres in the state ? Came across an up to the minute resource for everything Wyoming, laid-out sort of Farmers Almanac(y). Nothing like a little light reading/ 682 pgs

    THE HISTORY of WYOMING… copyright 1915. it’s a beautiful hardcover book, covered in what looks like green corduroy. you can view the .pdf link w/ Adobe, but downloading is muy bueno.

    https://ia902605.us.archive.org/9/items/historyofwyoming01bart/historyofwyoming01bart.pdf

      • Spallies-
        The town has always been Jackson. The valley where the town sits was called Jackson Hole by the trappers…
        A hole to them was a valley..if we were naming it today we would probably call it Jackson Valley…if we knew who Jackson was..
        The ski area is also called Jackson Hole…it’s named after the valley that you have a wonderful view of when you ski there…

        • Thanks Dal for the confirmation… I meet someone last summer who winters there and said it is now Jackson not Jackson Hole my sister who goes to the area every year agreed with her… I thought it was something new… But I guess it’s old…:) Thanks!

    • I was in the area several times this year, especially Meeteese. We really liked the place. The current museum was relocated. Not many people know this. Even Meeteese was relocated from across the river. There is a book that had been published but the ones you find in town are not up too par. Hopefully I can get my copy early next year. Funny, when I was there talking to the older folk, there was one person looking for an airport. Actually there was 2 in the area. You can see only one on Google earth. Anyway, lots of history near there. Especially, the town not for the meek but has been long gone. I can go on and on about that area. It was fun though.

  147. Off topic…I’m watching Aerial America on Smithsonian Channel tonight and it’s about Montana ….Very informative. Landscape is just beautiful. Maybe Lady of the Rockies is the Blaze….A must watch if you haven’t seen it yet.

    • Still off topic… We passed through Butte on our way to Yellowstone this Summer. I think it was a poor decision to have her sitting atop the continental divide. One can barely see her, and furthermore there is no access.

      I would have very much preferred to look at her sitting on top of that hill in the middle of the town. Sometime back in the 70’s, someone had a big ego and not enough humility.

      Personal opinion of course, but ever since, when I think of Butte I think of that missed opportunity :)

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