Sweetpea’s Adventure…

Submitted June 2014
by Sweetpea

 

WWWH
This to me was where Mammoth Hot Springs flows into the Gardiner River.  

Take it (the river)  in the canyon down.  Gardiner Canyon. 

Not to far but too far to walk.  It’s about 6 miles.

 Put in below the Home of Brown.  The Gardiner River flows into the Yellowstone River.  About a mile upstream is Bear Creek.  This is where Bear Creek Gulch is which I’m sure most of you know, Joe Brown discovered gold in 1866. Joe Brown had a home cabin up there. You can still see the remains of it today.

From there it’s no place for the meek 
True that. Steep.

There’ll be no paddle up your creek
This was an important clue to me.  Up your creek! Go up the creek. Go up Bear Creek,

Below the Home of Brown
If you’ve been wise and found the blaze,  
My blaze was a big hydraulic mining scar that is still very visible today. Primarily because where they were blasting, the hillside was mostly  SAND. If you want to see the blaze, you can see it easily from google earth,  and it looks just like an arrow pointing down. The very top of the blaze is on the Brown mining Claim, which is owned by the Gallatin National Forrest.  It’s legal to look for and take gold from a publicly owned mining claim.

Heavy loads = Heavy lodes, they did lode mining in there.

Water High = high pressure water; hydraulic mining, they did that there too.

Look quickly down your quest to cease
I was standing at the top of the blaze, and I walked down and looked downstream.  Then I found a stone claim marker that someone had put pink blaze tape around.  The claim marker looked just like a crudely made TOMBSTONE!

sweetpea

Dal, please download the picture I sent you. It’s of me and the claim marker.  It had the number 5627 on it, which is the survey number of the Brown mining claim.

This survey was done in 1899! What a cool thing to find!

Continuing down the creek,  I found more of these markers with pink blaze tape around them.  Finally, the last feature that had been blazed with the tape,  was a standing dead tree.  It was a bearing tree for a corner marker.  What to me  was fascinating,  is this tree was marked with survey number 5629, and you could still just barely read it,  this tree was stamped in 1899! How cool is that?

Now hear me all and listen good, Your effort will be worth the cold
You have to cross the creek.

If you are brave
to me this was a metaphor for the stone markers.
He used brave in his book in reference to brave dead people and also mentions their grave markers.

In the wood
This is the clue I thought I had, it’s kind of funny, but I thought very Forrestesque! Is that a word? According to the field notes from the original survey, one of the stone markers REPLACED an old wooden marker. In other words, the wooden marked was REPLACED by a newer model!  or so I thought.

There were so many other hint like features up there as well. 
Off of Jardine road there is a little lake called Bitty Lake.
 Right next to the Brown claim is the Gardiner claim.  On the Gardiner claim is a cabin, you can see from  the Jardine road. Miss Ford and the gypsy wagon are up there. (an old baby blue Ford country sedan, next to a horse drawn wagon with RUBBER TIRES!) sound familiar?

I have so much more to share, if there is interest I’d love to do so, but I know this post is getting awfully long.  
So what do you think? By the way, my whole family thinks I’m crazy!

Sweetpea-

This is Part One of a two part story. If you’d like to read Part Two, click HERE

29 thoughts on “Sweetpea’s Adventure…

  1. Interesting picture of the claim marker. Like I mentioned in the other thread – I like your solve – seems well thought out to me. My favorite spot is different but still in the MT/WY area. Would love to hear more about your adventure!

  2. was in the exact same spot in August 2012, as was another searcher. Obviously, we came up empty. There are more clues and history to the place….did you find the “Forrest” grave yet? Good luck – beat those bushes!!!!

  3. Sweatpea – What a great story and adventure! Go back and look in the woods on a cold north facing slope.

  4. Thank you Dal! I will write more very soon. I have some pics to send to Dal, when I get home to Colorado in about a week. Thanks everyone for your comments.

  5. Hi Sweetpea,
    My husband and I were just up there earlier this week. We parked at the rocky area that has the quartz and collected rocks and never made it to the actual site of Bear Creek to collect gold. I don’t think you’re crazy, just got to keep thinking about the clues to find it. Good luck and I would love to hear more about the area and what you saw.
    Carolyn – csan2000@aol.com

  6. I have some other thoughts to share. When I hiked down from my blaze, I looked quickly down. In the bottom of the blaze there is a cope of trees, so that was where I started looking. I didn’t see anything so I started to hike down stream, that’s when I found the claim marker that you see the picture of. After finding two more markers blazed, I started to wonder if I was following a trail, possibly the end of Fenn’s rainbow. The last blazed feature I found was a standing dead tree, which was a bearing tree. I thought immediately that this was Skippy’s tree, as Forrest said they should have buried him standing up! Standing dead. Use your imagination right? Also the number 56 and the number 27, are hints in the book, I can elaborate on these numbers, when I get some time. Me in the middle chapter is a hint I thought was about another small claim sandwiched between the Brown and the Gardiner claim. It’s called the canon claim. I will write more later when I can.

  7. sweetpea, my family would think im crazy too for chasing this treasure except they are already crazier than i am

    • Very kind of you Mr. Fenn to encourage story telling by those of us inspired by your stories. We hope you and your family are well:-)

  8. i think your search makes alot of sense sweatpea. I like the part about mining and Joe Brown gold. These are two points i’ve considered.

  9. Sweetpea-
    I enjoyed reading about your adventure. I liked the way you used the poem and the book to guide you to your destination. Especially the arrow.

  10. On page 95 of the book, Forrest writes about the Indochina war being 56 years ago, this book was published in 2011. If you subtract 56 from 2011, you get the year 1955. On page 94 he states that the Indochina war was in 1947. There is a mistake here, done deliberately in my opinion, … On the very next page, the year 1956 appears again. I know this seems like a stretch, but some of the hints may be very subtle, just as Forrest states. The number 56 is the first two numbers of the Brown survey, the Gardiner survey and the Canon survey! One more 56 shows up as a possible mistake, I’m not a pilot so I don’t know for sure, but the very first page, when you open the book and see all the pictures, there is a picture of an airplane with numbers on it’s tail. Then when you look at the writing underneath it, the tail number has a 5 on it whereas the plane itself does not. Any pilots out there know?

  11. When will the chase end? Oh, when the treasure is found, but where oh where did Ole Forrest find to hide his treasure so rare. I’ve tried Glacier without success, oh we saw a bear, and I fell against a tree, rattling my brain just a wee bit more. I was so sure we had all the clues, and was going to walk right to the treasure so bold, in grizz country to boot. There was water on high, and sure no paddling up M Creek. Sounds from the east were soothing as to Forrest as he listened with the wind in his youth.
    Back to the drawing board with a clear mind to think…where oh where Forrest does it lie in wait? Good story Sweetpea.
    piper

  12. Sweatpea,
    I’m curious about the Joe Brown ruin? Is there an on-site marker describing it as such? I know the history that is easily found online about his gold strike, but what evidence did you have to believe that this was his homestead? And what about “joe Brown Creek”? Could he have had a home there?

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