The Poem…Part Six

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This page is for discussion of Forrest’s poem. Please use it for only that discussion.

Here is Forrest reading his poem, The Thrill of the Chase. If you have not memorized the poem…don’t be concerned…neither has Forrest apparently…
http://dalneitzel.com/video/audio/poem.mp3

 

75 thoughts on “The Poem…Part Six

  1. Perhaps Mr. Fenn didn’t write the poem. He just wrote it down….therefore, he wrote the poem. Could I be as bold to suggest it’s anothers words put to pen by Mr.Fenn? ( The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ, etc. )

      • I do not feel this is the case. I know any one of us can have quite similar thoughts or words, but doesn’t mean they came from someone else. Hope I was able to explain my thoughts correctly.

        • Plagiarism covers things that have been previously printed, not the spoken word. There is no attorney or cleric privilege in this case so it is theoretically possible that someone besides Mr. Fenn dictated the words. No different than a reporter or court clerk typing out a speech verbatim.

          • I’ll elaborate. It has always been my contention that Mr. Fenn didn’t do this alone. Two can keep a secret if one of them is dead. Two CAN keep a secret….they’ve been keeping it for many years. Pious indulgence.

          • Your thoughts are his poem are someone else’s words, but he wrote them down as his own? How does this explain how he said he chose his words wisely (paraphrasing)? Perhaps I’m misunderstanding what you are saying.

        • I’m pretty sure he wrote the poem himself. Remember: he hid the treasure, Then wrote the
          poem. Not the other way around.
          I don’t think he robbed someone elses words or had any help.
          I wrote a poem in the 4th grade. It’s not that complicated 🙂

          • Or it could be a place he had never been to until he actually hid the treasure.
            From “Forrest Gets Mail From a Middle School Class”:
            Q: When was the first time you went to the place where you hid the treasure?
            A: I don’t want to answer that question. It is more of a clue than I want to give.
            If the actual EXACT spot was never visited until he actually hid the TC and the area (wilderness, state, etc) is his favorite place in the world, then that would explain him never being there until actually hiding it. If he had actually visited that EXACT spot when he was young, what would have been the harm with him saying that he went there or found the spot many, many years ago?

        • ok pdenver, then please explain to me at least what f meant by “I could have wrote the poem before I hid the treasure chest, but I didn’t.”
          Forrest has claimed numerous time and again that he put 15 years into this poem. That’s not what that statement is saying.
          Timothy…IMHO

          • To defend pdenver somewhat, I do believe they are possibly on to something. Fenn has stated that two can keep a secret is one of them is dead. And if we are to believe Tom Terrific (which I personally have no reason to doubt) when he stated, “…..Forrest told them “His father would know where he hid the treasure.”,” then I believe it may be his own father that Forrest is referring to. Perhaps it was his own father who had the idea of where and how to hide the TC. I do believe that Forrest did write the poem in his own words that took him 15 years to twist and turn. But wasn’t Forrest also disappointed at how little is remembered of his father? Maybe this is Forrest’s way of drawing attention to Marvin. And maybe most of us have been looking and trying to find out as much as we can about the wrong person. Who exactly was Marvin Fenn and what did he do and what did he possibly write?
            “As I have gone alone in there….”
            Is the “I” Marvin who went alone into his grave?
            Just a little different line of thought…..

          • Thank you, KP. I didn’t realize other comments had been made until your post.

            Hello Timothy. The quote, ‘I could have wrote the poem before I hid the treasure chest, but I didn’t.,’ has been a little bit of a mystery to me. As I sit here and think about it, I tend to believe what he has always said in the past; that he knew where he wanted to place the treasure chest (paraphrasing). He’s been there before.

          • (Second try.) ‘ “I could have wrote the poem before I hid the treasure chest, but I didn’t.” ‘ We’ve heard him state that he’s always known where to hide the treasure chest. This quote may be to say just that. He could have written the poem first, because he knew of the place, because he’s already been there. Hope this makes sense.

          • In my original post that didn’t go through, I tried commenting how that particular quote was a bit confusing to me. Did he hide the treasure chest, and then write the poem? Not sure. I thought I’ve read that his friends had seen it a month(s) before the book was published. Perhaps someone will correct me if I’m wrong.

          • Or it could be a place he had never been to until he actually hid the treasure.
            From “Forrest Gets Mail From a Middle School Class”:
            Q: When was the first time you went to the place where you hid the treasure?
            A: I don’t want to answer that question. It is more of a clue than I want to give.
            If the actual EXACT spot was never visited until he actually hid the TC and the area (wilderness, state, etc) is his favorite place in the world, then that would explain him never being there until actually hiding it. If he had actually visited that EXACT spot when he was young, what would have been the harm with him saying that he went there or found the spot many, many years ago?

          • Hi KP/Kevin!

            I agree with your line of thinking about not needing to doubt what Tom Terrific said, and that Forrest was referring to his own father as someone who would know the treasure location. However, I don’t think you need to do any further research into information about Marvin Fenn other than what Forrest writes about him already in “Thrill of the Chase” (Forrest also gave us a heads up at the end of TOTC that trying to find information about his father on the internet is a somewhat fruitless effort).

            I also don’t believe that going down this rabbit hole is a good direction to start off with if you haven’t already gotten a good solve based on the poem, IMO.

          • Kevin: ‘Or it could be a place he had never been to until he actually hid the treasure.’

            Mr. Fenn during Moby Dickens book signing: ‘I decided I knew where I was going to hide the chest.’

          • Kevin, in regards to the example you gave between the children in school and Mr. Fenn’s response, I’d like to offer a thought to you. If he had responded that the first time he had gone to this place, he was a young child, or a teenager, where would you start looking? Wouldn’t that be too much of a clue?

  2. I like the part about two can keep a secret if one is dead… I’ve often thought, someone else knows his spot…. but they are all dead.

    So its his secret.

    Its his poem. he wouldn’t be so possessive if he didn’t write it. ‘Don’t mess with my poem.’

    He likely reads it on video, so as not to add any unwanted inflection, or make an embarrassing mistake. And… if you watch him read it, it looks to me like he is hardly looking at the words, its just something to focus on. IMO

    • I’m pretty sure his dad and probably the rest of the family knew about the secret spot. I believe it was one of the places they used to hide their fishing gear.

  3. Kedar’s mom–

    Actually, it’s “if you’ve been wise and found the blaze”. When referring to being brave it is present tense: “If you ARE brave and in the wood”.

      • Oh, I see what you’re saying. He does say “if you’ve been brave”—but the printed poem (in many different locations) has it in present tense. So it’s clear that we know the answer—I mean, answers. 🙂

    • Hey kadar’s mom
      That’s because in that statement the person who found the TC has not left the location yet. As a builder the word “wood” changes it’s meaning from the word “woods” meaning the original wood ia a finished piece of wood not a tree.
      Just something to think about
      Timothy…IMHO

    • Hey kadar’s mom
      That’s because in that statement the person who found the TC has not left the location yet. As a builder the word “wood” changes it’s meaning from the word “woods” meaning the original wood is a finished piece of wood not a tree.
      Just something to think about
      Timothy…IMHO

    • This is part of my premise that the poem should not be “messed” with. “Straight forward”… “….I wasn’t playing any games…” is less ambiguous than “Don’t mess with my poem” if taken in context with how these statements were offered. To me…they are both synonymous. It is understood that many writers and poets often hid messages in their works for various reasons. I cannot recall ever being instructed to read them other than presented. In Fenn’s case his poem is a map with nine clues that leads to a treasure…and the reader is challenged to decipher his meaning from beginning to end.
      I have never started reading a book in another place other than the beginning…nor has it occurred to me to do that with a poem. When reading either…poem or book…I want to get the full story or meaning without corrupting it before I even start. Perhaps Fenn has introduced the Chase to promote an alternative procedure to reading and understanding the mysteries of script and prose ? The ills that plague society are already out of skew…I don’t think Fenn wants to add to that. Just another searcher that wants to figure this out…without making it my story.

      • Ken,
        You never read a story that started at the end [of the story], and worked it’s way back though the plot and finished where the story started, at the end?

        It’s not about “starting to read” the poem from stanza 5 or 6 or 2…
        You’re only looking at the technical aspect of reading English. But ya might be missing the imagination aspect. Which is one aspect of poems, the need to be interpreted.

        It’s about, after reading the poem from top to bottom and left to right… one might see that the beginning of the first word, in the first line, of the first stanza, might not be where it all begins. Nor does “Begin it where” must be in present tense. It could be just another way of saying ‘once upon a time’

        It changes nothing within the poem, no words, phrases, lines, and yes, no stanzas or format changes. It only changes the understand of how the story, or in this case the poem, is understood.

        In this case…
        Knowledge; knowing how to read.
        Poem; imagination, interpretation.

        • Seeker…you and I could go on and on until the cows fell over. My above comment was not about the stories/poems I have read…nor the reasons why/or how I dissected them to learn the meaning. It was about the basic fundamentals of first reading something correctly in order. Your attempts to blow holes in my theory sheds light on the problem at hand. Everyone interprets things differently…and that is just how life is. My opinion is that you have skipped over some basic steps and headed right to the operating room…just don’t take the leg off because you have a headache.
          I say…my opinion…read the poem in order and understand that first…
          You can say whatever you want …but don’t imply that I do not know how to read just because my method doesn’t jive with your…”Its about…” or Knowledge; knowing how to read etc.
          Carry on…and have a wonderful day Seeker…maybe Loco is right…too much line out .

          • Ok, maybe this will help… because, all this is, is a discussion of different opinions, and I’m not sure if I’m getting my point out as clear as I like it to be…

            Look at it this way;
            We are given a list of materials. {stanza 1 2 3 4} But we don’t know where to ‘start’ to place the first piece {clue} or even why it needs to be where it supposed to go.

            Stanza 5, gives a question that has been ‘answered’.. the summation of where to start with the pieces, and why.

            Now we have a ‘starting point’ to Begin with the correct first piece…

            I think the main problem has been, imo, we are thinking the first “clue” is the starting point. But it might be only the first piece of all the piece. The starting point tells us where to put the pieces together.

            No guessing, no dart tossing… no messing with the poem. Simply a possibility of analyzing what we have.

          • Seeker…I understand perfectly what you are trying to say. I just do not see it that way. That methodology implies that stanza five has been deciphered (gives a question that has been answered…the summation of where to start with the pieces, and why.). Really? Are you certain of that? Last I knew… no searchers have made it that far.
            I will say again…I believe that the first clue is in the first stanza and that without that…there is very little chance that anyone will knowingly make it past the first two or three clues.
            If you don’t have the first clue nailed down…
            My “Army men” just complained about not being fed and they have sand in their eyes…gotta go!

  4. If “You’ve been” brave and in the wood I give u title to the gold. Well Forrest I have been Brave.
    Now I need that gold. 😉 $$$$$$$ lol ha ha.
    I will read it next time. Ha ha ha love it.

  5. I don’t think past or present tense on ‘brave’ has any bearing on the solve.
    Whenever Forrest reads the poem he pronounces ‘tarry’ as ‘ta-rē’ as in ‘to stay somewhere’ rather than ‘tärē’ which is ‘of, like, or covered with tar.’

  6. A question about the two mistakes in the old poem that was on Forrest’s website (link below).

    The two mistakes are:
    1. In line 2 (Stanza 1) it was “tresures” instead of “treasures”
    2. In line 19 (Stanza 5) it was “answer” instead of “answers”

    Forrest has said (not in these exact words) that answer(s) was a spelling mistake, pick whatever you want, the poem can be solved with either.

    My question is, did he ever explain the “tresures” difference? I cannot seem to find it anywhere. Could this “mistake” reveal that by “treasures bold” the meaning is “tressures bold”?

    tressure =
    * an ornamental enclosure containing a figure or distinctive device, formerly found on various gold and silver coins.
    * a narrow inner border on a shield, usually decorated with fleurs-de-lys. * Middle English tressour, from tressour, tressure band for the hair, headdress, from Middle French tresseor, tressure, from tresser to tress + -or, -ure

    It might also be a coincidence that the missing S if it is “tressures” was was added to “answer” by mistake. Either way, my question is did Forrest ever explain why his website used the word “tresures” in the poem?

    Note: Please do not think that in any way I am saying Forrest was misleading. I do not think he would do that, however “tressure” sounds a lot like “treasure” and “tresure”, maybe he fixed it so it is clear what he meant, or maybe because it can too easily be associated with “tressure”?

  7. @curioushobbit….no need to worry about copying…not with this sort of Spud at least…;)

    Rites

    A church and a wedding
    May be good,
    But first there was incense
    Of cedar wood.

    Instead of candles,
    Remember the fire
    In the hills, with the wind
    As your choir.

    You may answer the question
    “Do you take…?”
    But the holiest font
    Is a mountain lake.

    The sacred hills
    Are higher than churches,
    And they have steeples
    Of silver birches.

  8. This page is a ghost town. Lots of those in Wyoming. Anyways, here’s the poem without the lines containing ‘I’ ‘You’ ‘Your’ ‘Me’ and other similar words including ‘Brown’ because its capitalized and at the end of a phrase:
    And hint of riches new and old.
    Begin it where warm waters halt
    And take it in the canyon down,
    Not far, but too far to walk.
    From there it’s no place for the meek,
    The end is ever drawing nigh;
    Just heavy loads and water high.
    But tarry scant with marvel gaze,
    Just take the chest and go in peace.

    Notice how there are only nine lines left.

    • Jack,
      I have thought about this in a similar way & may have something there but I wouldn’t exclude PIBTHOB. I’m not sure why you grouped this with ‘I’ ‘You’ ‘Your’ ‘Me’.

      I have noticed that the only stanzas he mentions I – I’ve – I’m – Me or My are the 1st – 5th & 6th stanzas.

      So maybe stanzas 2 – 3 & 4 are about you.

  9. This page is a ghost town. Lots of those in Wyoming. Anyways, here’s the poem without the lines containing ‘I’ ‘You’ ‘Your’ ‘Me’ and other similar words including ‘Brown’ because its capitalized and at the end of a phrase:
    And hint of riches new and old.
    Begin it where warm waters halt
    And take it in the canyon down,
    Not far, but too far to walk.
    From there it’s no place for the meek,
    The end is ever drawing nigh;
    Just heavy loads and water high.
    But tarry scant with marvel gaze,
    Just take the chest and go in peace.

    Notice how there are only nine lines left.

      • I am usually 2 steps ahead of people. I just dont know how Forrest does it. He is always 3 steps ahead. As they say, it takes one to know one.

      • Jonsey1, have you seen the movie Wild Bill 1995 Jeff Bridges. The very last part of the movie made me laugh. Just as Wild Bill gets shot with Aces and Eights. The camera pans to a deck of cards. The cards label is Brown Fox Playing Cards….. It was a good movie.

  10. As I have gone alone in there…
    So why is it that I must go…

    I find it slightly odd the way stanza 1 & 5 start. In stanza 1, you would think the wording would flow better with… As I’ve gone alone in there, not unlike in stanza 5 ‘I’ve done it tired…’
    Also, wouldn’t stanza’s 5 first line read as ‘So why is it I must go…'[ dropping the “that” ]. If both stanzas relate fully to the same person? [ I’m not looking/considering proper grammar, just curious to the reasoning of presentation ].

    Are these slightly different worded lines meant have a reason or subtle way of saying, they are not one in the same person?

    Other quirts are; treasure to trove, as well as, stanza 5 is a form of a question with an answer[s] and stanza 1 talks of hints. Yet, another thought is; why not place stanza 5 at the end of the poem? Imo, stanza 6 would more likely read better/efficient after stanza 4, as it seems to be instructing us about the poem, and not so much an ending… with the question [ stanza 5 ] following it all up or finalizing the poem. I mean by now [ this far in the poem ], the reader is supposed to understand fenn has already gone, right?

    So, If fenn has gone alone in there and with the “treasure”… why tell us he’s leaving again, and with his “trove”? Seems a bit redundant, right? Why the subtle differences in the words chosen?
    Of course we do have hints of riches vs. answers [ “I’ve” done it tired, and now “I’m” weak ] to consider when reading these stanzas as well.

    The point to this; Do we understand these three stanzas as well as we should, or are they just [ like some proclaim ] simply meant as an intro to the poem and the poem’s ending?

    • Treasure vs. trove may be an artistic expression. Not having to use the same word repeatedly, but having the same meaning. This is an opinion, offered as a thought.

      • Artistic expression is always great in a poem… but there are two different meanings of treasure and trove, as well as their placement within the poem. This particular poem contains information to a million plus in gold and stones. Are these words simply written off as artistic expression? Many seem to be writing off a lot of words in this poem…
        “The poem in my book is something that I changed over and over again. When you read the poem it looks like just simple words there. But I guarantee you that I worked on that. I felt like an architect drawing that poem.”

        • Each have their importance, along with artistic expression. It will be difficult, but not impossible (paraphrasing).

    • I think f masked the ultra important beginning point in a seemingly vague first stanza. Then, he additionally masked that by having two stanzas at the end that don’t contain clues. He could have been counting on many to be focusing on the end stuff and skip over the beginning…which is how things have played out and f has commented about after the fact.

      • Fundamental ~ ” Then, he additionally masked that by having two stanzas at the end that don’t contain clues.”

        I guess that is one way of looking at it. Three stanzas just to screw with our heads… kinda a waste of 1/2 a poem.
        The again, if deliberate, it would make the poem even more difficult. But, that sounds like red herrings to me… 1/2 the poem not containing any clues, simply there to mask the real clues… If I’m reading your comment correctly.

        • Seeker, the last two stanzas may be to confirm what has already been done in the previous stanzas.
          ‘So why is it that I must go
          And leave my trove for all to seek?
          The answers I already know,
          I’ve done it tired, and now I’m weak.’

          This is an opinion, offered as a thought.

          • I get PD, and a lot of searchers seem to think the same. I just wondering if there are others that see it different…
            I’m also looking for that “…one important possibility related to the winning solve.”

  11. Starting with the poem, it references by title his two books, TTOTC and TFTW. Each of those books in turn references by title other books. I conjectured that if f “liked” the book I should read it. But if f didn’t like the book I could ignore it. Two of the books he liked and I subsequently found useful were Flywater and Journal of a Trapper. I’m not selling books just sayin they contain information helpful to the searcher. Again it’s all my opinion.

  12. As odd as it might sound, the word “the” from the poem is one of the most important hints in the Chase. It’s definitely in the top three! If you don’t believe me, don’t forget who won the Top Gun trophy. As always it’s my opinion. Best of luck figuring out why. 🙂

  13. “there are a few words in my poem that are not useful”
    Why do you people keep trying to make literal sense out of the poem and the grammar and the tense, and the order of presentation, when he seems to be stating that most of the words were selected for different reasons than the obvious ones.
    Study the word selection and try to figure out why he used treasures, trove, riches, chest, when they all basically seem to mean the same thing. Why are there so many y’s, I’s, ands, an it’s.

  14. Peace => Piece => Scrap
    Title => Book
    Peace + Title => Scrapbook

    So do you still think there are no hints in the scrapbooks?

    Treasure => Thesaurus

    • Dal’s site, is the only personal blog that has SB’s { started after the release of the book}. The first SB was dated Feb 2013, 3 years after the release of the book/poem/challenge. The words you equate from the poem to SB’s could have been written into the poem as much as 20 years prior to the thought of a SB… on a personal web page, by a searcher.
      How in the world can you logically believe that those “words from the poem” have any kind of connection / information related to Scrapbooks, and the reasoning you think SB’s hold hint?
      That’s one heck of a fortune cook ya got there.

      Just blurting out my thought as well…

  15. Here is how f tells you the significance of his Q&A. It is built solely from things found in the poem.

    quest + yon + and + answers + with + Forrest Fenn

    Just FYI.

  16. You will need your thesaurus to see this one, but f just might have thought of everything …. even planned Weekly Words to be part of the Chase. I’m not certain but it’s starting to look that way. Or it could just be a coincidence? You decide.

    weak => Week
    quickly => ly
    put => Words

    • Weekly Word is the creation of the Blogs Owner…{fanatic web site I might add} fenn only agreed to participate. Not unlike;
      Six questions with…
      Random words
      Feature questions

      No deciding needed… that was done for us.
      Mr. Thesaurus, what color is the sky in your world?

  17. Hi all. I am not an active searcher or anything, but have been lurking on here for a while and enjoy seeing everyone’s thoughts on the treasure. One thing I keep coming back to in my own thoughts, is that the poem seems very similar to the story River Bathing is Best on oldsantafetradingco.com. Forrest said that he used to ride his bike to Ojo Caliente as a kid, and it seems like the poem could follow his ride there on a map. They also use some of the same words. Below is the poem with some of my thoughts in parentheses to show the similarities that stick out to me. Anyway, these are just my thoughts and good luck to all of you searchers:
    ————————————————————————————————–
    As I have gone alone in there
    And with my treasures bold,

    (In the past, to his secret bathing spot
    In the present to hide the treasure
    ff – I’d ride my bike into Yellowstone Park)

    I can keep my secret where,
    And hint of riches new and old.

    (Both the poem and the story use the word secret:
    ff – My secret bathing spot – where the hot water tumbled into the stream)

    Begin it where warm waters halt

    (Hot water from geothermal features first enters the river in the Upper Geyser Basin.  In 30 miles, the Firehole River warms almost 30 degrees.  This warm water temperature facilitates year-round insect activity and trout growth. 
    Also Dal’s WWWH being at Madison Junction:
    There are two rivers in Yellowstone that are known to be very warm. They are warm and yet they are great trout fishing streams. Rivers that Forrest and his dad both fished extensively..and often took clients too, the Gibbon and the Firehole.
    So perhaps you see my interest in this place where the Firehole and the Gibbon end as not only a unique place..but also likely to be the place Forrest intends us to “Begin it..” in his poem.)

    And take it in the canyon down,

    (Down on a map through Firehole Canyon)

    Not far, but too far to walk.

    (According to Google earth, it is about 5 miles from Madison Junction to Fountain Flats Drive. Also, ff rode his bike there and has made other comments about bikes:
    ff – I’d ride my bike into Yellowstone Park to a spot about twenty miles from town where a seldom-used dirt road turned right off the main drag.)

    Put in below the home of Brown.

    (Turn right on Fountain Flats Drive,below the Nez Perce creek:
    ff – where a seldom-used dirt road turned right off the main drag.

    Put in can also mean stop ex – if a ship puts in, it stops at a port

    In 1890 brown trout were introduced into Nez Perce creek a Firehole tributary and in the 1920s, rainbow trout were introduced into the river. Today, the falls still block upstream migrations of spawning trout from the Madison River, but the upper Firehole has become a world class trout fishery because of these introductions )

    From there it’s no place for the meek,

    (Getting out of your car and walking maybe, or because it is bear country. Or from the story:
    ff – It was a wonderfully uncivilized pleasure in a remote area where nothing could interrupt the purity of my naked solitude.)

    The end is ever drawing nigh;

    (The end of Fountain Flats Drive:
    ff – They also closed that little road to all vehicles
    ff – Several years ago, with my daughter Kelly’s family, my wife and I drove to the little road (It’s paved now) and walked to the river)

    There’ll be no paddle up your creek,

    (Don’t go in the water)

    Just heavy loads

    (Fountain Freight Road trail at the end of Fountain Flats Dr)

    and water high.

    (Water high = the river:
    Forrest Gets Mail…
    Forrest responds- What is wrong with me just riding my bike out there and throwing it in the “water high” when I am through with it?
    Implies it is something big enough to throw a bike into, like a pond, lake, or river)

    If you’ve been wise and found the blaze,

    (At this point, you are at the river, which could be the blaze:
    The firehole river, named b/c ppl thought the steam was a fire:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firehole_River
    The river was named by early trappers for the steam that makes it appear to be smoking as if on fire.[2]

    Or it could be something else in the area)

    Look quickly down, your quest to cease,

    (Somewhere around where the trail meets the river. )

    But tarry scant with marvel gaze,
    Just take the chest and go in peace.

    So why is it that I must go
    And leave my trove for all to seek?
    The answers I already know,

    (ff – That spot, which was so important to me sixty-six years ago, is mostly overlooked now by the occasional passerby. My memories of those experiences are so dear to me that I hope in time all of my grandchildren will follow my footprints to that special place.)

    I’ve done it tired, and now I’m weak.

    So hear me all and listen good,
    Your effort will be worth the cold.

    (On effort –
    ff – I made that bike ride more than a few times, even though it was somewhat arduous to pedal that far at only one manpower. But it was always worth the effort.

    ff -*Victory will always justify the effort. (Posted October 21st, 2016)

    On cold –
    ff – Sometimes, when Kelly curls her long blond hair through her fingers in the sunlight, I am reminded of those long water grasses gently weaving and twisting in the river. Winters are cold for those without such memories.

    ff – *Plan a warm place into which you can retreat. Merry Christmas (Posted Dec. 25th, 2015) )

    If you are brave and in the wood
    I give you title to the gold.

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