Tale of Two Solves – Part Two

SUBMITTED JULY 2017
by DUSTIN IN ARKANSAS

 

After the first solve failed I went back to the hotel room and started working on coordinates. I had a general area of where I wanted to go, but did it match up to the poem?  I worked on coordinates for about four IPA beers long and then stepped away.  Granted I drink very slowly, it took me about 5 hours.  I’m on to something now, but it can wait.  Let’s go back and base my Solve on absolutely nothing….like before.

Where would warm waters halt? Puddles in West Yellowstone? Big Sky, Montana?  Let’s put that together.

“Begin it where warm waters halt and take it in the canyon down”.  This to me was leaving West Yellowstone towards Big Sky, Montana in Gallatin Canyon.  By the way, I’m 100000% confident it’s in the Gallatin National Forrest during this time.  Of course, I’ve been wrong all along.

“Not far but too far to walk.  Put in below the home of Brown.”  This partially meant I needed to put in the water as soon as I left West Yellowstone and follow it north. I’d rather not say what I believe is the home of Brown.

“From there, it’s no place for the meek, the end is ever drawing nigh;”.  Well wouldn’t you know it?  Next up the road was this little gem –

It made me think of the gypsy story where they partied and played music until late into the night.

Since “nigh” means left, I should take a left here.  So I did.  The road is called Taylor Fork Road.  This made me remember Forrest talking about taking a fork in the road.  Hmm.

Next down the road I went over a creek and pulled off after it.

“There’ll be no paddle up your creek, just heavy loads and water high.”  There is a lake up there.  What if “no” means don’t go?  Let’s try that.

Up from the creek on the right is Lincoln Mountain!

“If you’ve been wise and found the blaze”.  Well, he said the best education he ever got was in five minutes with his dad.  One of which was about honesty.  Honest Abe.  Looking at the mountain, I’m wondering if this section is the blaze or it is around the area.  It’s terrible when you start making the blaze what you want it to be.  I believe you’ll know it when you see it.  Looking at the side facing south, it looks like lightening marks.  I’ll get to that in a moment.

“Look quickly down your quest to cease.”  Looking down from what I thought was the blaze, there was an odd dead tree towards the top in the middle of the lightening marks.  Picture coming.  Even if I had taken the creek around and then went south “been wise”, I would have ended up at the same location and looking down at the same tree.

“But tarry scant with marvel gaze, just take the chest and go in peace.”  This to me meant I needed to follow the horse trail along the mountain to get to the blaze.  By the way, he said it wasn’t in close proximity to a human trail. He never said it wasn’t in close proximity to a horse trail. This to me was the marvel (Thor/lightening) gaze that I needed to stay within while searching:

Did you see how the side of the mountain looks like lightening bolts above?  I know a lot of mountains have this feature, but here we are.  Along the horse trail I was able to walk to the tree (in the wood) and check it out

I immediately looked under it, inside of it, and around it.  There was a HUGE opening on the side of the wood, but no treasure. It could have held several 10×10 chests.

The best part to me was the view.  “If I were standing where the treasure chest is, I’d see trees, I’d see mountains, I’d see animals, and I know the chest is wet.”  I wondered how you’d plan to always see animals if you were where the chest was. Well, across the way is a ranch with horses.  Crazy.

With the Gallatin River below me, and yes it’s in the Flywater book, I was sure it’s the right mountain.  It’s within the elevation remark.

I’m just in the wrong spot and in the wrong wood.  I should go back up the creek to the water high.  We made it a little over a mile until it started to rain and lightening. We had to head back.  Plus, a grizzly was growling at us from the other side of the creek.  If you haven’t ever been in that scenario, let’s just hope you don’t have to be.  We left.  Yes, we looked in the trees between the river and the mountain, along the river, and in a few other places.

Oh, and when I got below the mountainside, I checked the coordinates of where I was and my stomach turned. Those numbers looked familiar to what I was working on yesterday! 44…111… and I don’t remember the others.  44 West Yellowstone section.  Pot holes of water?  111 no place for the meek? “DO NOT TOUCH!!” Is the physical solve an alternate to the coordinate solve? Yet they both lead you to the same location?  Lewis and Clark cipher?  Why does the identification card on the front of the book have a picture of him as a kid?  Why does the ID card have certain letters on the left highlighted section in a darker tape color? Why do these letters highlighted say N A CIPHER…? Yes I know it technically says “N A CIPHEM” but the “M” is cut off to make an “R”.  This is now part of my final solve I’m working on….only to give it away to someone else once I’m done.  Let me know if you’re interested in having it.

I can’t do this any longer.  I’m going to be a dad in two months and my time will now be spent working on her room and reading books on how to be a great father.  That excites me more than The Chase.

Even though Solve #2 was a little messy, especially being done within 24 hours, I really liked it.  It had more heart, came together better with the book, and had a better location IMO.  I know I executed it poorly and I didn’t allot enough time for it.  Darn storm!

Fenn is a new four letter between my wife and I. It’s kind of funny.

Good luck to you all and as Forrest said to me, “Be safe in the mountains. Take no risks. F”

Fin,
Dustin in Arkansas-

Tale of Two Solves – Part One

SUBMITTED JULY 2017
by DUSTIN IN ARKANSAS

 

I’m from Arkansas and I’ve been involved with The Chase for a month now. Here are a few tidbits, IMO, I now believe from my searches:

1. Always eat a good breakfast.
2. I failed to solve the poem.
3. Read the book over and over until you go mad.
4. When I punched in the coordinates of solve #2, most of the numbers matched up to the pages in the book referring to the specific parts in the poem. That was odd. It leads me to believe the location will be in Wyoming or Montana.
5. There are a zillion know-it-alls on the web that are rude and treasure-less. Shocker.
6. I hope Dal finds it.
7. I’m done with The Chase. I wrote, dated, and signed a note to my wife that I would stop this nonsense haha. Fin. If anyone would like to reach out to me, they can. Before you begin to think you know exactly where it is, I can bet it’s not the place. I believe you have to use the poem to solve the clues, then use those clues in such a way that they will uncover and lead you to the general area in which the chest is hidden. I don’t have the complete solve on this, but it’s pretty near complete. You WILL in fact need more than just TTOTC, the poem, and the map. I can go into great detail if anyone wants to reach out to me at: rizzero@gmail.com

Solve #1-

Let me begin with saying this solve was completely fabricated based on hunches and derailing from the book. Looking back, we had a terrific time even though it didn’t pan out.

“Begin it where warm waters halt.” This to me was Mammoth Hot Springs. In love with Yellowstone.

“And take it in the canyon down.” This was Gardiner Canyon.

“Not far but too far to walk.” 10ish miles.

“Put in below the home of Brown”. We put in between Gardiner and Jardine where Joe Brown had his mining operation.

“From there it’s no place for the meek.” In the book it talks about how the Comanches would raid the barn and stir up a commotion with the chickens. Next to Gardiner was Turkey Pen Creek (yes we searched that too).

“The end is ever drawing nigh.” That meant that it was coming up on our left. Bear Creek.

“There’ll be no paddle up your creek, just heavy loads and water high.” This was Castle Lake, the mining scars, the boulders, and the mining tailings all connected to Bear Creek.

“If you’ve been wise and found the blaze, look quickly down your quest to cease.
But tarry scant with marvel gaze just take the chest and go in peace.” We walked up the Bear Creek trail until we came to the only clearing you will find on the trail.

Across the clearing was a white mark on the hillside. When the sun is out of the east it really ignites. The tarry scant and marvel gaze part was for us to slowly go down like Spiderman. It’s wasn’t bad at all. An 80 year old man could have done it.

At the bottom of the hill was a hollowed out log and I was pretty pumped about it. I whipped out the flashlight and…negative. We continued to the creek, searched in it, around it, and even walked down it below the blaze. No bueno.

All-in-all I have to say that this was a bust. Do not waste your time on this one. We checked everywhere thoroughly. We even went below the creek where it meets Yellowstone River. Maybe it’s up at Castle Lake? If that’s true, then that should be the ONLY place you waste your time. Get a horse, and after you’ve wasted your time read the book again.

Sincerely,
Dustin in Arkansas-