Where Warm Waters Halt…Part Eight

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This page is now closed to new comments. To add to the discussion please go to the latest WWWH page.

This is for a discussion about Where Warm Waters Halt. We’ve all got ideas that didn’t work out or we are willing to share…I think we can give folks just starting out some ideas for the kinds of places that might just be the place Where Warm Waters Halt…or not!

Let the discussion begin…

dal…

Holy Blazes!

SUBMITTED August 2017
by John Edo

 

I remember reading about the chase some years ago and looked at the poem like that could be any where, and forgot about it for a few years.

About 2 years ago I read it again and with some help started putting together my own take on the poem. I tried to stay away from the books as the poem was all you need, but have purchased my copy and enjoyed reading it multiple times.  The first line of the poem seemed to include the experience of Forrest as he was flying and covered up his left eye over Philadelphia.  Eye alone in the(air). The picture from my war for me always seemed strange that half of his face was light and the other half was dark.

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I took a mirror and placed it both ways on his face and had found my guru!

 

Using this experience of Forrest with the “begin it where warm waters halt”; I found something very interesting in the air over his favorite bathing spot, in the Firehole.

There was face with half of it covered up looking to the east. Following the instruction to “HALT” I read the clues to see what was next. Take it in the canyon down; where it was the view from his eye; it went right to the canyon village falls. So I had my canyon down.

 

My first search of this area had something very interesting at the bottom of Tom’s trail carved into a tree that I happened to take a picture of.

A couple symbols that did not look like initials and were very out of place. It took me 2 days to figure out what they were.

Forrest and others had mentioned the owl of Minerva and sure enough the tetradrachm on both sides has a face looking to the right and the owl with the symbols on the back.

But I didn’t know why the symbols were upside down. I plotted the eye point and the canyon on a map and went back to the clues. The line of sight made an “f” between the upper and lower falls, which was my guru signing his work of art!

 

Not far, but too far to walk made sense form the start point to here and then put in below the home of Brown. “Put In”; to me sounded like “Put TIN” below Brown. Following the view points it went just under Lamar Ranger station to a place called mirror plateau. Is it possible the item to put in is a mirror? Lamar definition showed definition of the sea, so that seemed like a good home of Brown and the item to put in.

There was also instruction “down” from canyon, and I noted that point on the map as well.

Now from the reflection in the mirror, “no place for the meek” made sense as it was reversed and was a place for the meek. Uncle Tom’s trail; where I had been and the mark in the tree now made me feel better about this! The picture from “teachers with ropes”, with 2 boys in front of car, also pointed to the view from the brink of the lower falls looking at Tom’s Trail.

The end is ever drawing nigh line takes you back to the eye, as you’ve now seen the points of Forrest life. His bathing in Firehole, his “big empty” in the canyon, 328 combat missions also equals the number of steps in Tom’s Trail, artist point, being in the artwork on the canyon, and lastly his feeling of being redeemed by rainbow and beauty of the view in the lower falls.

Heavy loads were dented metal steps from rocks and water high also described the falls. “If you’ve been wise and found blaze” was next, and this really points to Forrest blazing his own trail in his own way. So back at the face, the next clue was  to “look quickly down”. From the eye looking down at a glance there is another point that sticks out similar to the canyon down; Mary Mountain west.

From the canyon down there is a Mary Mountain east. Connecting the lines between these 2 points; a line is created that is parallel to the view thru canyon and reflected back to the face. While searching the west point the clues to tarry a scant distance with marvel gaze did not seem to yield any places to travel along the line of sight to find it to take the chest. I had also looked at possible place at Mary Mountain East, but came up short on the clues.

I believe there are multiple meanings to each line and words between words that need to be read and followed. Like the end is ever drawing nigh; the end is severed… and brave and in the wood I give you title to the gold, brave and dint hew wood dig ivey out it let to the gold. Otherwise I had a great time in Yellowstone with my family and for sure will be planning a return trip. Wish all searchers the best, with big thanks to DPT, Iron Will, Diggin, and to you Forrest! Thanks!

by John Edo-

Odds n Ends About Fenn’s Treasure Hunt…Part Thirty Three

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Please click on the comment balloon below to contribute to the discussion of  Forrest Fenn’s Treasure Hunt. Please note that many topics have their own pages. Please scroll through the blog to see all the discussion pages. There are also stories, scrapbooks, searcher’s reports general information, tips from Forrest, a rumors blog and even email responses from Forrest. So please look around and if you want to make a comment please use the most appropriate page.

Thanks…

 

dal…

Brown’s Canyon Solution

SUBMITTED JULY 2017
by Dave from KC, MO

 

I think Forrest Fenn might have hidden his treasure somewhere within a small stand of cottonwood trees located just to the east of “Seidel’s Suck Hole” (class IV rapid) and the railroad tracks located on the Arkansas River in Brown’s Canyon in Colorado.  Below is my dissection of the poem, clues, hints and comments from Forrest.

As I have gone alone in there – Unsolved, possibly not a clue or hint.  I am concerned that this is actually the first clue and that ‘alone’ is the most important word.  If the treasure is buried in a special place that Forrest often went alone, I am not sure that my location is one of those places for Forrest…maybe it is, but the evidence is not as strong in this regard for my location as opposed to other theories that would have better hints from TTOTC.  With  that said, please continue reading because I think the other solutions below are fairly strong…especially the blaze.

And with my treasures bold, Unsolved, possibly not a clue or hint.  ‘Bold’ could be a hint to a short trek that I took which required me to go through two unlocked gates.

Stone Bridge

I can keep my secret where, – Unsolved, possibly not a clue or hint

And hint of riches new and old. – Unsolved, possibly not a clue or hint.  The new treasure could be his autobiography and everything else is old treasure.  Or, the ‘new’ riches could be the rafting and good times had by families and friends at this location.

Begin it where warm waters halt and take it in the canyon down, Clue #1 – many hot / warm springs above Brown’s Canyon and some are tributaries to creeks that run into the Arkansas River above Brown’s canyon (e.g. Chalk Creek, etc.).  Other hint – Forrest Fenn has stated that several people have gotten the first two clues…meaning it is a somewhat popular / obvious solution / place and not one of the more obscure theories.  Brown’s Canyon is definitely not an obscure solution location and many people are searching for the treasure in Brown’s canyon.  Extra affirmation – Forrest said that when he buried his treasure he could smell pinyon nuts in the air…pinyon nuts are common in the Brown’s canyon area but I do not think these are not located in Montana or Wyoming…during that interview, Forrest mentioned that he regretted one of the things he said…I believe the pinyon nut clue was that regret (basically shrunk the search area to New Mexico and Colorado).  This area is at about 7300 feet (Forrest said it is above 5000 and below 10200 feet).

Not far, but too far to walk.  Clue #2 – From Chalk Creek to the ‘put in’ at Stone Bridge is is approx. 10-11 miles which is not far but it would be a long walk to the starting point for a 79-80-year-old man.

Put in below the home of Brown.  Clue #3 – ‘Brown’s Grotto Warm Spring’ is located a couple of miles north of Stone Bridge ‘put in’ (place to launch boats, rafts, kayaks, etc.).  Stone Bridge is the first public ‘put in’ below Brown’s Grotto warm spring.  The closer public ‘put in’ to this warm spring would be ‘Hecla’ but it is north of Brown’s Grotto (not south).  Extra affirmation hint – Forrest has indicated that several people solved the first two clues and then essentially ignored, or flew right past, the rest of the clues…this could be a reference to the multiple people that indicated (on blog sites) that they started at the Hecla ‘put in’ which is ‘above’ (north) and not ‘below’ (south) of the potential home of Brown (i.e. Brown’s Grotto Warm Spring).

From there it’s no place for the meek, Clue #4 – Class III and Class IV rapids are not for the meek.  Seidel’s Suck hole is the only class IV rapid in the canyon.
The end is ever drawing nigh; Hint – as you walk up the east side of the Arkansas River using the abandoned railroad tracks (because the west side is private) the river is ‘drawing’ (i.e. pulling towards you) on the left hand (nigh) side.  The end is Seidel’s suck hole which will be on the left if you are on the east side of the Arkansas.  Extra hint / affirmation – Forrest was asked if he used any other mode of transportation besides walking and his car…. Forrest replied (paraphrasing to follow…not a quote) that he did not know if he could answer that question with a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ properly (i.e. maybe this means some might consider the railroad tracks a ‘mode of transportation’ whereas others would not? – this was a big affirmation for me about the railroad tracks being used by Forrest).

Seidels Suck Hole

There’ll be no paddle up your creek, Clue #5 – since you are walking up stream there is no need for a paddle.  There is a creek between you and the Arkansas River as you walk along the railroad tracks on the east side.  You are heading north (‘up’).

Railroad Tracks

Just heavy loads and water high.  Clue #6 – Heavy loads (note this is plural) has multiple meanings
·       Railroad tracks used for heavy loads
·       Forrest Fenn’s heavy loads carrying the 42 lbs. treasure (two trips)
Water high could also have multiple meanings
·       The water at Seidel’s suck hole is deep and there is a drop off at its beginning.
·       The creek that runs between the Arkansas river and railroad tracks is at a higher elevation than the Arkansas River

If you’ve been wise and found the blaze, Clue #7 – I believe the blaze is the diamond shaped yellow ‘Dip’ road sign that is located in the rocks between the river and railroad tracks on the east side of the river just north (upstream) from Seidel’s suck hole.  Extra later affirmation hint from Forrest – he said he walked ‘less than a few’ miles to hide the treasure.  The ‘Dip’ sign potential blaze is located approx. 2.5-2.75 miles north from the Stone Bridge ‘put in’ meaning it is less than a few (3) mile hike.  Forrest said he made the two trips in one afternoon and two trips to this location including hiding the treasure would probably take about 4-5 hours which is a full afternoon.  Extra affirmation – Forrest said some searchers have been within 200 feet of the treasure and that some people have walked right past the treasure and had no idea.  Multiple searchers have written in blogs that they searched along the west side of the river at Seidel’s suck hole (those who started a Hecla).  The distance across the Arkansas river from the west side to the blaze is approx. 200 feet.  Also, people rafting on the Arkansas river sometimes get out of the raft on the east side before Seidel’s to inspect it and watch others go through before going through themselves…these people would walk right past the treasure without knowing it.  Extra affirmation – Forrest has said the place is safe and a place you would want to take your kids.  Many families with kids on vacation go to raft these rapids on the Arkansas river.  For a ‘wise’ stretch hint, please see below for ‘in the wood’ clue.

Dip Sign Blaze


Look quickly down, your quest to cease, Clue #8 – I believe this has double meaning.  First, I believe it is a confirmation of the correct Blaze (i.e. if a sign is warning you of a ‘dip’ ahead, you should probably heed the warning and ‘look quickly down!’ (this is the clue that sunk its teeth into to me the most…I was ‘going in confidence’ after thinking I solved this clue).  This clue was also telling me that I should look a short distance (i.e. ‘quickly’) south (i.e. ‘down’stream) for the chest.

But tarry scant with marvel gaze, – Unsolved, possibly not a clue – possibly telling the finder of the treasure to be quick with taking the treasure since this location is full of tourists.  It might be a reference to all of the tar covered railroad materials located in the area (this tar would not be on the treasure and thus scant).
Just take the chest and go in peace. Unsolved, possibly not a clue– I could not find anything related to a peace symbol (except maybe the cottonwoods that had trunks that branched out from the base of the tree creating a peace symbol…but that is a major stretch).  It could simply mean that the finder should just leave this public place quietly since he/she is now carrying 1-2 million dollars worth of treasure.

So why is it that I must go – Unsolved, possibly not a clue or hint
And leave my trove for all to seek? Unsolved, possibly not a clue or hint
The answers I already know, Unsolved, possibly not a clue or hint
I’ve done it tired, and now I’m weak.  More of a hint than a clue, I think this should tell the solver that the distance travelled was significant and not short…. Even though Forrest was 79 or 80 he was a fit lifelong treasure hunter…the walk made him tired and weak and he was forced to make two trips to carry the heavy load.  After Forrest hiked to Seidel’s suck hole and back to his car twice, he would certainly be tired and weak at age 79 or 80 (approx. 10-11 miles total for the two round trips).  Some might have underestimated the distance he could have travelled.  The elevation change on those railroad tracks between Stone Bridge and Seidel’s is slight and not significant, which makes this possible.  I have done it…I am not very fit…I think he could have done this even at age 79-80.

So hear me all and listen good, Unsolved, possibly not a clue or hint
Your effort will be worth the cold. Unsolved, possibly not a clue.  Hint – all of the potential locations have the potential to be warm and cold depending on the season since Forrest has indicated the location is between 5,000 and 10,200 feet in elevation.  The mulch-like soil in the small wooded area to the east of Seidel’s suck hole would be cold and moist so if Forrest put the chest into the mulch then the finder would probably get cold moisture on his/her hands or gloves.  Forrest also said to bring gloves hinting the hands might get cold when digging in the cold moist mulch.


If you are brave and in the wood – Clue #9 – There is a small stand of cottonwood trees (maybe a dozen or two dozen) just south of the blaze and directly east of Seidel’s suck hole and the railroad tracks.  The ground around the stand of cottonwood trees is soft and covered with leaf litter.  Under the leaf litter is a layer of rotting wood, roots, mulch, and rotting leaves…it was slightly moist when I was there in the summer and would be wet in the spring thaw or after a rain.  Extra hint – Forrest has stated that he knows the chest is wet but not underwater.  If it is covered with that mulch like leaf litter it would be moist and wet after a thaw/rain (also, the cottonwood was known to Native Americans and pioneers as a ‘water’ tree (often pointing them to the location of water)).  I am not sure why the word ‘Brave’ was used…the area is not scary.  Digging through the mulch was not fun, but I was not really scared.  I did not see any rattlesnakes.  I did not see any native American rock drawings (i.e Brave as in Native American reference).  Possibly you need to be brave to just be searching for treasure on public ground (or maybe more specifically doing some ‘digging’ (i.e. with your hands) on public grounds).  Digging with a shovel might be frowned upon?.  Forrest has not confirmed nor denied the treasure is buried.  If the treasure is under the leaf litter / mulch / rotting ground, would that be considered buried?  Forrest has indicated that a metal detector would only help if ‘you are on exactly the right spot’ (yes, that is how metal detectors generally work…I think a metal detector would help if you are in the wood).  Stretch hint, the scientific name for this Rio Grande Cottonwood tree is Populus deltoides wislezenii (maybe the ‘Wise’ reference above is an abbreviation of the scientific name?).  Extra affirmation – again, Forrest suggested taking gloves…gloves would definitely help protect your hands and keep them warm when moving around the cold, wet, heavy leaf litter/mulch surface in this area…you might not need a shovel, just some gloves.

In the Wood


I give you title to the gold.  Unsolved, possibly not a clue

Other hints that help ‘rule in’ this location/solution.  It is safe and not dangerous (Forrest has said this about the location).  There are no human trails (not many access that side of the river along the tracks…and Forrest might not consider the railroad tracks a human trail).  Although he would likely not admit it, Forrest Fenn seems to want to leave a legacy that would immortalize him in some ways (i.e. writing memoirs, books, autobiography, etc.) and choosing a famous location that gets thousands of tourists every year would be a great choice for someone wishing to have a long lasting effect…just think of how people that rafted through Seidel’s suck hole would react when they found out they were within 100 feet of this treasure…and think of how many people would see, and talk about, a possible future monument to Forrest Fenn erected at the location of the Dip sign blaze?  This would be discussed with tourists on all future rafting trips through Brown’s canyon…Forrest Fenn knows a thing or two about making this type of big splash and seems to like the notoriety.  I think he would choose a high impact location like this as opposed to something more obscure (just my opinion and Forrest Fenn might not agree with me).  One thing that cannot be argued is that Forrest is a brilliant marketer and promoter.  Nothing in the poem, and none of Forrest Fenn’s subsequent public hints / clues / statements have ruled out this location.  My primary concern with my solution is that I could not find any evidence as to why this location might be so special to Forrest that he would like to be buried there…and that  is potentially a big problem.

The only other problem with this solution is that I do not believe the treasure is there.  On July 1st 2017 I searched all dead logs, in the hollows of the cottonwoods, all through the leaf litter, in the rock crevices, etc…and no treasure.  I even purchased a metal detector and made a second trip July 3rdto the location to see if it was located in the mulch somewhere that I did not originally search and all I found was some old wire, pieces of metal, iron railroad track parts, old beer cans, etc.  I did not find the treasure.  Confirmation bias is a factor, and it is quite possible I think this solution is better than it actually was…unless Forrest brought a shovel and buried it in an area of hard packed soil (as opposed to the loose mulch) that I did not really search…I did get one intriguing hit on the metal detector in one spot of hard packed dirt that I did not dig because I did not have a shovel and could not do it with my hands.  It might be worthwhile for someone to explore the area with a good metal detector and a shovel.

Dave from KC, MO

Reading the Blaze – Part Four

SUBMITTED JULY 2017
by DWRock

 

The Ultimate Solution

After returning home from my second trip it wasn’t days before the experiences and thought fragments resolved into the most undeniable solution to the poem yet!  This solution extends the track that I had been following tying together the complete arrowhead image on the map, the “f” Fort, and the previously unresolved lines of the sixth stanza.  I guarded my excitement because I estimated that I had run out of credit with Ruthie… at least for the season!  Feeling no need to research further I allowed my attention to drift away from the chase for a few months.  The last quarter of 2016 provided plenty of distraction.  Nothing gets past Ruthie for long!  She soon learned of my intention to make yet another final attempt in 2017.  I was surprised how quickly she adapted to the idea, but it was not accepted without a stern request that I would see resolution to this obsession with a third trip.  I felt completely justified and guiltless because I knew in my heart that I had earned a private viewing of Forrest’s magnum opus. Here it is…..

As I have gone alone in there

And with my treasures bold,

I can keep my secret where,

And hint of riches new and old.

This first stanza introduces Forrest’s intent in masterminding the chase.  There are no clues here that directly aid in the search, and interpretation is not necessary to finding the treasure.  Foremost he states that he acted alone in hiding the treasure, and that he alone knows of its secret location.  The last line of this stanza is intriguing: I think “riches” refers to memories and experiences real and/or possibly imagined.  It may also refer to the adventures that Forrest has experienced in his pursuit and discovery of artifacts; similar to the adventures that he now inspires others to experience in the search for his treasure.  The sentiment of this stanza contributed to my initial impression that Yellowstone National Park, Forrest’s childhood utopia and wonderland, is the location of his treasure.

Begin it where warm waters halt

And take it in the canyon down,

Not far, but too far to walk.

Put in below the home of Brown.

If Forrest had defined the search area as the entire continent rather than merely the US Rocky Mountains I would probably have arrived at the same starting point.  In the big picture Yellowstone National Park is where warm waters halt.  If you are not convinced then try driving past the Boiling River, Mammoth Springs, or Grand Prismatic Spring without halting!!  Looking back I wonder that I might have developed this solve more efficiently if I had foregone the hours of research and map study and instead headed straight for Yellowstone with an open mind.  All you need is the poem.  The ranger at the entrance gate will hand you a simple park map that is probably the easiest map on which to initially spot the blaze.

 

If Yellowstone is the first clue then the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone is the clear second.  One might notice that the first trail that leads into the “canyon down” to the river is the Seven Mile Hole Trail.  This trail is too far for Forrest to have completed for his treasure hide, but some part of it will be traveled in the end.  First we must get there.  Our attention has been drawn to the spectacular canyon carved by the Yellowstone River.  The length of river from the mouth of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone and through the Black Canyon of the Yellowstone to Gardiner, MT, forms a bold arcing cut on the land that some might immediately recognize as resembling one half of an arrowhead outline.  The tip of the arrowhead is formed by the confluence of the Gardiner and Yellowstone Rivers which viewed from above is a striking point of land in itself.  Immediately down river from, or “below”, the juncture is the North Entrance to the park, the logical starting point or “put in” for the search journey.  If you are halted, as you likely will be during the season, by traffic at the pull-off and parking areas for the Boiling River you might decide to stop in and check it out.  One of the interpretive signs on the path to the Boiling River describes the phenomenon that warms the waters of the Gardiner River resulting in favorable conditions for the winter spawning of Brown Trout. The tail end of the Gardiner River is the home of Brown.

From there it’s no place for the meek,

The end is ever drawing nigh;

There’ll be no paddle up your creek,

Just heavy loads and water high.

The roadway from the North Entrance, past Mammoth, continuing toward Norris, and on to Canyon almost mirrors the complimentary section of the Yellowstone to roughly complete the classic shape of an arrowhead on the map.  This third stanza helps to hone this route into a more convincing symmetry making the image unmistakable, revealing the obvious intent of the author of the poem, and providing some important landmarks to be used to help identify the end location of the treasure using a precisely drawn arrowhead overlay on a typical park map.  First stop along this road is the featured area “Sheepeater Cliffs”. This feature is marked on the simple park map and is a straight forward interpretation of “no place for the meek”.  Drawing a straight line “from there” (the park entrance or “put-in”) to this featured stop on the road improves the arrowhead tip.  One navigating the arcing edge of an arrowhead being drawn in a counter-clockwise direction should expect it to trend leftward: “The end is ever drawing nigh.” This is generally true of our arcing section of the Yellowstone River and its complimentary section of roadway, but a few miles south of Sheepeater the road bends sharply to the right creating a large bump in the drawing that significantly disturbs the symmetry of the arrowhead.  This can be conveniently corrected by deviating from the road at Solfatara North trailhead to continue the tracing along Solfatara Creek Trail.  There is no creek (“no paddle”) for the first three miles, and much of this fairly linear trail runs in a cut beneath power lines (“heavy loads”).  The trail itself does not look very appealing for this reason.  Why would anyone go to Yellowstone to hike a transmission cut?  The only reason I could come up with was the near access it provides to the scenic Lake of the Wood (“water high”; sits at about 7800 feet).

If you’ve been wise and found the blaze,

Look quickly down, your quest to cease,

But tarry scant with marvel gaze,

Just take the chest and go in peace.

If you have correctly interpreted the clues of the second and third stanzas you have over three quarters of an arrowhead drawn on the map which can easily be completed by symmetry coming around to its starting point at the “canyon down”.  The end is the beginning.  The lines that follow seem to halt the momentum of the second and third stanzas.  The mouth of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone is defined by the impressive Upper and Lower Falls.  The course of water between these falls when viewed on a map or aerial photograph forms the spine of the letter “f” oriented perfectly upright when viewed in cardinal alignment.  The crossbar comes in from the west as Cascade Creek drops down Crystal Falls to meet up with the Yellowstone River.  “Quickly down” could be interpreted as ‘cascade’, and “marvel gaze” might refer to ‘Crystal Falls’.  This stanza is designed to cause the seeker to pause here and ponder the whole of this “f” shaped feature that connects the ends of our blaze like the clasp of a necklace.  One feels the deep power and mystery of this place when looking down into the small gorge from the Crystal Falls overlook.  Is the chest here for the taking?  The broken stone wall out of which Crystal Falls pours, the steep sloping sides flanking east and west, the impassible raging falls barring north and south, the overlooks like turrets, and the walkways running the high perimeter of the whole requires just a little imagination to perceive the area as the “f” Fort.

So why is it that I must go

And leave my trove for all to seek?

The answers I already know,

I’ve done it tired, and now I’m weak.

This stanza, like the first, addresses the author’s own actions and intentions and contains no directions or clues for the searcher to follow.  The first and fifth stanzas, along with the final line of the poem, might be intended to aid in the process of legally transferring ownership of the treasure to the finder.  This stanza also hints at his overall mission in creating the hunt.  He has told us that the “thrill of the chase” began for him when he was nine years old and discovered his first arrowhead.  He continued to pursue this thrill as a youth in Yellowstone, as a fighter pilot in Vietnam, as a successful art dealer, and as an accomplished amateur archeologist.  The desire to pass his experience of the “thrill of the chase” on to future generations is why he created the hunt.

So hear me all and listen good,

Your effort will be worth the cold.

If you are brave and in the wood

I give you title to the gold.

This sixth and final stanza is the most complex of the poem.  In the first line Forrest asks us to listen to his words twice.  This instructs us in how to interpret the following word “effort” as both “f” Fort and F (as in Forrest) ort (as in his leavings).  “Will be worth” is translated as “will be even with” and/or “will be equal to”.  “The cold” is Glacial Boulder which lies at the head of the trail to Silver Cord Falls Overlook and Seven Mile Hole.  By tracing a straight line from the “f” Fort to Glacial Boulder, and then continuing that line an equal distance beyond it, the end location of the “F” ort (or treasure) lands on the axis of the arrowhead where the wooden shaft of an arrow would be fixed: “brave and in the wood”.  How fitting that the treasure lie where the arrowhead (which symbolizes the “thrill of the chase”) would be fitted anew with a wooden shaft so it could once again take flight!

On the dawn of the New Year I began reviewing the available materials for content that would support or conflict with my solution. I came up with a handful of doubts or concerns: Was my spot too far to walk? Was the location of the hide too random (not intrinsically “special”)?  Was I overreaching to fit my needs when interpreting Solfatara Creek Trail as “heavy loads and water high”? Was my interpretation of the 4th stanza weak or unresolved?  Was I overextending my imagination to conceive of the “f” Fort?  Most concerns I dismissed after a comprehensive review of Fenn’s comments.  If he had been vague about something (he is usually vague) I let the uncertainty favor my solution.  I discovered some comments (new to me) that further supported my solution.  A few stubborn concerns laid themselves low in my consciousness and later proved to damage my confidence in the final days before my trip.

The more time passed the more I believed that others must have identified the arrowhead.  How could they not see it?! The blog forums were buzzing with anticipation for this search season, and several commented that they believed that this would be the year that the treasure is found. By early March I could wait no longer and purchased a plane ticket for May 19th.  This would be about a week before typical melt off, but I took stock in rumors of an early spring.  Snow depth telemetry data from the Canyon area available online indicated that the snow mass had been sitting at about 150% of normal.  I worried about this, but still favored a competitive start, and began routine monitoring of the data every morning. The snow level sat at about 50 inches from the first of February… and sat… and sat.  When it was still 50 inches on the last day of April I acknowledged my folly and moved my ticket to my next available weekend.  I was glad that I did when May 19th arrived with 20+ inches still covering my search area.

In the last days before the trip my anxiety heightened.  One specific doubt that I had previously shrugged off now resurfaced and caused me to question the plausibility of my golden solve.  I had just watched the video recording of the Moby Dickens Book Store Q & A in which Forrest clearly indicates that there is a difference between the many searchers who have traveled unwittingly within 500 feet of the treasure and the few who had come within 200 feet.  Previously I had chosen to assume that these near-misses were made by the same people, and that Forrest had only improved the accuracy of the estimated distance over time.  The comment as I now understood it did not seem to fit with my solution.  All those hiking the Seven Mile Hole Trail would pass the treasure at the same distance (approximately 330 feet by my calculation).  If searchers on this trail weren’t looking for the treasure, then they would have no interest in deviating from the trail to accidentally come closer to the treasure.  A familiar feeling began to set in.  I could best describe it as low grade nausea or anxiety and might relate it to the feeling of being lost or uncertain of one’s surroundings, or the guilt after having done something wrong.  Doubt had caused me to hasten and half-heartedly search nearly every other location that I had been to on this journey.  In the case of Otter Creek I had to make a return trip before I was content with my search of the area.  Would this happen again?

Another concern was the randomness of my determined treasure location.  Most believe that the “very special place” that Forrest refers to is a favorite fishing hole, a secret scenic splendor, an unknown site of archeological significance, or an intriguing geologic feature.  It seems that most also believe that the blaze is a physical marker of some kind that will be found on site to reveal the hiding spot of the treasure.  The end location in my solution lands in a random section of undisturbed and untraveled pine forest with minimal elevation change.  There would likely be no scenic vista or geologic prominence.  The arrowhead blaze on the map is huge and I estimated that slight variations in its construction could account for upwards of 1000 feet of error in calculating the axis location near the base of the arrowhead.  The precision of the measure to the treasure location seemed to improve with the equidistant line drawn from the “f” Fort balanced through Glacial Boulder, but I expected at least 100 feet or more of error.  Any subtle variations to my interpretation of “your effort will be worth the cold” could change the mark significantly.  Forrest seems to have indicated that the one with the correct solution will smugly stroll from the car directly to the treasure.  For this to be true in my case I believed that there must be some marker or markings to guide me in once I arrive. This was the only part that remained a mystery.  I adopted a hunch that Forrest had left an arrowhead blaze on one or more trees to lead to and/or mark his cache.

I had a tight weekend trip planned arriving in Bozeman by noon on Saturday.  I knew the routine and my pre-planned movements successfully landed me at the trail head about 30 minutes ahead of schedule.  I could tell I was tired, though… I hadn’t been sleeping well for the past couple of nights, and I wasn’t thinking quickly on my feet.  Luckily I was only a couple of hundred feet from the car when I remembered that my maps were left in the trunk!  The sky was gray with diffuse cloud cover, but no rain, and the wind was whistling through and bending the trees causing the creak and chirp of tall and skinny pines rubbing together.  With no direct sun it felt later than it was.  Despite the initial ominous tone I quickly found comfort on the trail.  The ground was firm, free of mud, and the tracks were by a large majority human… I only identified one set of bear and cub prints.  After thirty minutes on the trail I came to a sign indicating I had walked one and a half miles from the Glacial Boulder trailhead and had one mile to go before the next junction.  I stopped and turned on my old Garmin GPS.  It struggled for a few minutes only finding one satellite… finally I grew impatient and stowed it.  Map and compass were more important to me anyway, but it would have been nice to use GPS for distance measuring and documentation.  The mileage sign is about a quarter of a mile down a section of the trail that moves due north and away from the canyon rim.  In another eighth of a mile the trail changes direction about forty five degrees to the east.  A quarter mile past this bend is the near point on the trail to my determined treasure location.  I did my best to estimate the distance by counting my paces from the bend and placed a rock on a log to mark the spot.  I didn’t send off into the woods yet, though… I walked a bit further to be sure I didn’t miss any marking potentially left by Forrest to direct the wise searcher to the cache.  The trail continued to rise gradually until it reached its high point several hundred feet beyond where I had placed the rock.  There on the left side of the trail I found large triangular or arrowhead shaped blaze carefully hewn into the side of a pine tree.  This blaze has a slight right tilt which if laid or projected horizontally would align nicely with the direction of my arrowhead on the map.  Just what I was looking for! Orienting the map I noted that if I walked back into the woods following the counterpoint direction of the tree blaze (or shaft direction if it were a completed arrow) I would arrive at approximately the same spot that I had already planned to walk to from my previously marked near point. This is how I started my off trail searching. By my estimate the treasure would lie between 300 and 400 feet from the trail. Due to Forrest’s use of 500 feet as the common near miss I made sure to walk over 500 feet along a fairly straight path and then doubled back with slight variation until I was back on the trail.  Just for curiosity sake I did the same on the other side of the trail following a line in the direction that the tree blaze seemed to point.  I repeated this process two or three times on either direction with variations including starting from my rock on a log spot to search through my pre-determined end, as well as, some exploration of various rises on the tree blaze side.  I moved slowly and scanned 360 degrees around my position at any given time looking for some marker or sign of human presence.  I found nothing.  I walked the wood for over two hours before I decided to pack it in for the night.  I planned to return the next day for a more thorough search, but my heart was barely in it.  I had arrived with some significant feeling of doubt and the failure of my initial attempt left me all but deflated.  I managed to nab a canceled campsite reservation at the Canyon Campground and settled in for much needed sleep.

I awoke at 5:30 am with daylight burning.  Pondering the maps a little I made a plan for the return to my main search area, but first I would make a couple shorter excursions.  I returned to the brink of the Upper Falls lot and walked out to Cascade Falls Overlook.  I carried a tent stake in my pocket thinking that if I found myself back down in the “f” Fort I would probe the earth where I had dismantled the rock cairn back in September.  It seemed improbable that the treasure be buried down there, but I found it hard to completely dismiss the curious find I had made in this mysterious and potent location.  Conditions proved unfavorable.  The rocky gulch that I had easily descended in September now ran water.  If I could find a safe way down I would have certainly gotten wet trying to cross the swollen Cascade Creek.  I peered down toward the small group of trees and renewed my affirmation that this was just too exposed a place for Forrest’s purpose.  I could not see the remains of the rock cairn.  It would be left a mystery to me.

I then returned to the Glacial Boulder, but instead of trotting down the trail toward my search area I paced off into the woods toward Canyon Campground.  My plan was to search a line drawn from Inspiration Point through, and balanced by, Glacial Boulder. This was based on an alternate interpretation of the fourth stanza in which the lines reference the successive overlooks: Lookout Point, Grand View, and Inspiration Point. I toyed with the word “inspiration” and its various meanings as being a central theme or motif in the poem: the key word to unlock “begin it”, “take it”, and “take the chest”.  In this less polished solve the “effort” was Inspiration, or to inspire, which was the Point, or purpose, of the chase.  I plodded through this section of wood in similar fashion to how I approached my search area the previous evening.  The contrast here was that the route was crossed by several well-worn paths of which some included old trail markers nailed to trees.  I made just one pass covering a greater distance than required before exiting directly to the road.

I then returned to my primary search area down the trail toward Seven Mile Hole.  Instead of walking all the way to the near point on the trail I chose to depart into the woods just a few steps beyond the trail distance sign I had encountered on the previous day.  I was attempting to follow the final length of the linear projection from the “f” Fort through Glacial Boulder.  This meant a quarter mile of off trail walking to get to the calculated end point.  I had changed the axis of my approach to more comprehensively address the potential error.  I continued beyond my “X” up onto a broad elevated area toward a labeled high point which happened to lie on my path.  I then expanded my wanderings to include any and all high points in the relative area. After about two hours of rambling through this wooded plateau I started recognizing every rock and tree and decided to return to the trail. I was disappointed but not surprised by the outcome.

I needed to get out of the woods and breathe the open air for a while.  I headed to Wapiti Lake trailhead to exercise the fleeting hunch that I had conjured up at the end of my second trip. Again pursuing the alignment of Glacial Boulder and Inspiration Point, but this time in the opposite direction, across the canyon, I aimed for Forest Springs, a thermal feature near the Wapiti Lake Trail.  A steady drizzle set in forcing me to don a poncho to avoid becoming drenched.  The rain couldn’t dampen the beauty of this easy two mile walk… Long range views of snow topped mountains, the company of grazing bison and elk, the smell of sage, and the added adornment of wild flowers had me in good spirits.  Before long I was amongst the trees again, but they seemed better nourished – generally larger and healthier than those of the previous wood I had explored.  The sulfur smell was not overpowering but rather comforting, as was the warmth and bubbling sound emanating from several white steaming thermal pots on either side of the trail. A few breaks in the trees offered views into the meadow valley to the south.  I passed a small body of water, and then arrived at the finger of woods containing Forest Springs. I walked along the small emerald green heated spring waters that followed the edge of the wood where it met with the meadow and led to a strip of calcite-rich sand.  I had come to the opinion that this was the most pleasant and scenic little walk I had taken in Yellowstone and speculated that Forrest would have done well to plan this as his final stroll before laying down on the box.  I didn’t stop to rest, though, and circled back straight through the wood toward the trail and then returned directly to the car. My treasure hunt was over but there were a couple more short hikes I wanted to take by the north entrance before the end of the day.

One was to walk the first mile or so of Rescue Creek Trail.  This cut across the flat plane of land that was my grand arrowhead’s tip.  I wanted to get another perspective of this wedge of land and possibly view the terminus of Bear Creek from the south bank of the Yellowstone River.  I enjoyed the short walk but decided not to follow through with the off trail hiking that was required to access the river view.

Then I exited the park, selected a site at Eagle Creek Campground, and set off to walk the Yellowstone River Trail down Bear Creek to the river. This ended up being one of the most interesting and featured short hikes that I had taken in the park. An old stone and plank miner’s cabin (Joe Brown’s?) remains in pretty good condition, but not accessible from the trail (at least in June) due to the impassible raging waters of Bear Creek.  The trail side was littered with rusty but intact old mining equipment.  From the foot bridge at the base of the creek I could see the mysterious doorway into the rock that was recently noted on the blog by another searcher.  I’m certain it has no relevance to the treasure hunt, but it is intriguing none the less.

Thankfully I returned home with no new twists of interpretation or leaps of insight to lead me onward into ever uncertain depth in the chase.  I was ready to welcome the resolution that would come with knowing that my solution was all together off the mark. Unfortunately, I could not reckon with this belief.  The arrowhead solution was just too good.  Reflecting on the past days I considered that my doubts about my solution may have limited my focus in the field, and that my expectation that some marker or marking would easily lead me to the treasure may have been unfounded.  Could I have walked right past it?  I wished I had been more thorough in my search of the area, and I imagined how I my approach would differ if I had another chance… I would locate to as near to my exact calculated treasure spot as possible and then slowly spiral outward from there within a range of reasonable error.  I would carry no expectation of a marker or marking… I would assume that the small chest lay somewhere in the area on top of the ground, but possibly covered by grass and tree fall… I would consider variations and side searches such as more exploration in the woods beyond the arrowhead tree blaze that I had found, but only after my primary search area was thoroughly combed.

Fortunately, a friend had recently moved to Bozeman who required very little convincing to jump in the car and go check my work.  He carried an operable GPS and arrived at the same general search area as I.  He then carried out the search I wished I had.  He had the same outcome.  I think I’ve found the bottom of this hole.  Do you?

DWRock-

Those Three Words……

July 2017

by Dodo Bird

 

 

I had resigned myself to the fact that I will go to my grave without ever hearing those three words that mean so much. It is not in the cards for me, nor the stars. I was born with all the necessary parts and pieces…its a matter of inadequacy i guess. Some things are not meant to be. Its easy for me to blame my creator or gravity and everyone around me, but deep down I know I need to change. I dated an ostrich for a time. Her parents refused to accept us as a couple.
So I visit here at Dal’s blog to read others thoughts and stories of Fenn treasure hoping to find inspiration. I do believe the man hid a treasure and I’m going to find it. And with this new found wealth, I CAN change. The fact that two searchers have died looking for Fenn treasure does not phase me one bit. They believed him and so do I. After all, people dying over a belief that may or may not be true is nothing new. Many have died over the course of history believing in religions, governments and charismatic individuals. But im not going to die. Im going to be rich.And im going to buy lots of things with the money- a gym membership to lose weight, I’ll get a pedicure, a nose job. I’ll have my wings fixed and then, most importantly i’ll take flying lessons.
Sometimes I go to the airport just to watch the planes. I sit at the airport bar and meet people from all over the world. And even though im not going anywhere  I take an empty suitcase along to make it look like I am. One time my suitcase fell over and a lady picked it up for me. Realizing it was empty, she knew my game. As she stood up, righting my fallen case, a small tear pooled in her lower eyelid. I just mouthed a thank you and she paid for my next drink. Sometimes I can hear people behind me mocking…”hey look! ha ha it’s a dodo bird…at an airport! ”  im so happy they are entertained by this fact.
I just ignore them. it aint easy being a bird that cant fly.
But after I find fenn’s treasure, I’ll show em all. I’m going back to that airport. I’ll strut proudly out on the tarmac. And everyone who laughed at me will watch in amazement as I get in line with the jumbo jets on the taxiway. I’ll wait my turn, flexing my new wings with deep powerful strokes warming up creating just as much jetwash as the jumbos. and when my turn comes, I’ll stand on my tippy toes at the end of the runway with the wind in my face, nose high in the air and over the control tower loudspeaker everyone will hear those three words that mean so much…..
dodo bird!
CLEAR FOR TAKEOFF!!!

Odds n Ends About Fenn’s Treasure Hunt…Part Thirty Two

pink

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Please click on the comment balloon below to contribute to the discussion of  Forrest Fenn’s Treasure Hunt. Please note that many topics have their own pages. Please scroll through the blog to see all the discussion pages. There are also stories, scrapbooks, searcher’s reports general information, tips from Forrest, a rumors blog and even email responses from Forrest. So please look around and if you want to make a comment please use the most appropriate page.

Thanks…

 

dal…

A Different Way of Looking at Clues

SUBMITTED JULY 2017
by Seattle Sullivan

 

   The main thing people need to focus on is the way Forrest thinks. Remember his mind stays at about 13.  Back then life was all farts and giggles. So imagine the games Forrest and Skippy , must of played in the back seat on their way to Yellowstone . I envision them picking apart the wording on highway signs. ICY CONDITIONS MAY EXIST , ( I see why conditions may exist).

Cold Night

    What I am getting at is a whole different way of looking at the clues. It’s all a play on words. I call it  what I named my book “Well Knit Wit”.  Where is this book you ask?  It’s sitting in front of me.  Once I publish it, ” in which after reading it, Forrest hopes I do” my secrets will be told. The other reason being after consulting with Forrest at this years Fennbouree, I am holding off on a chapter I call “B- ond,  James Bond”.  It has to do with the green olive jar and and certain secrets”.  To me, and a few friends, the 20,000 word autobiography is the most valuable item in the chest. It is what drives me.  Funny as I am homeless and live on a $734 SSI check in the most expensive area in the nation. Dal, (pronounced Dale), will attest to that one.

My Front Yard in Snohomish County

      There are certain things we need to do in the solve. Forrest tells us how to play the game if you are wise. Butterfly – Flutter by for starters. And if he doesn’t see a word in the dictionary, he will make one up. Many of the answers combine Spanish and English. And spelling correctly is pointless, its all in the pronunciation.
Lets begin:
    My favorite clue is ” If you don’t know where to begin, you might as well stay home and play canasta”.  Here is why he used the word CANASTA specifically.  BE GIN.  In New Mexico, there are tanks of water in certain areas used for fire fighting. Each one is named. Since Forrest is a PET TALKER, or in slang , a pet taca, I picked the array of tanks, “Tanqueray”…..as in gin, above Petaca.  If you can, pin PETACA TANK A on google earth.  Oh ya, canasta is an anagram of  TANCS A.

 

Pet – Talka

   Next, the answer that came to me in a dream. Here is where to BEGIN.  By counting the letters in a verse of the poem .  “Not Far”has 2 words before the comma. Go down the alphabet 2 letters…A-B. The last letter is the one we will use. So remember the B. Next , “But to far to walk” . Going 5 letters down the alphabet you get E .  “Put in below the home of Brown”…   7 letters gives you the G.  “From there it is no place for the meek”…gives you the ” I “.  The next verse has no comma, so combine the 2 sentences.  “The end is drawing ever nigh- there will be no paddle up your creek”, this will give you your N.  Add it up boys and girls, it spells BEGIN.
   Ah , but that’s not all folks. We have one sentence left.  “Just heavy loads and water high”.  Now being from Texas, that southern drawl comes into play.  Yesterday when I was using my backpack, I ADJUST the heavy loads. So ,  ADD  “Just heavy loads and water high” to the next verse”.  Count up the words.  It totals 36. This is your degree. The next verse “including the question mark” makes 32. These is your minutes.  Next verse 29. Your seconds.  36 – 32 – 29  latitude.  By counting letters starting at “From there it’s ……and ending at “and waters high”, you get 106 letters. Thats your longitude. But its easier if you just look at Forrest’s last name. Fenn.  ” Santa FE N.N.” , or directly North of Santa Fe.  Get back on google earth and pin those co-ordinates. Amazingly they are 1 mile from the Tanqueray location.  This is where you BEGIN.
As the inside cover says a little resolve is needed, I’ll start resolving now at where most everyone else starts:
1)   Begin it where warm waters halt.   I believe it is the array of tanks above Petaca.  Take the story Forrest uses about the array of burned out tanks and war relics in Northern Africa. This I believe gives credence to my Tanqueray theory.
1a)   And ta-Kit (Carson) in the canyon do w. n.   (due w. x n.)
2)  Not far, but too far to walk. My spot is around 4-5 miles as the crow flies, to the h.o.B.
3)  Put in below the home of Brown.  This is what I believe is Forrest’s bluff.  But you still put in below it. Simply a brown house on a bluff, and /or the Brown in the local graveyard.
4)  From there it is no place for the Meek. The area is sketchy and the locals are watching you .  The dogs chase your car and bite at your tires. The pavement ends , and the mud begins.
5)  The End is Drawing Ever Nigh.   See the dead end ?  Nigh I hear means left. Try that
6) There will be no Paddle (ORE) up Your Creek.  As the post marked culvert shows,  go no farther up the creek. There is no gold further up.
7) AD Just Heavy Loads and watter high.  This is where you park and walk, the power lines end,
8) If You’ve (U.V.)  been Y’s and Found the B la ze, ……. I once used a Ultra Violet light looking for the Blaze.  I believed back then the treasure was in the mine tailings, hence “The end of my Rainbow”, meaning Rainbow Trout Tail”ings”.   I climbed in and under the huge pilings, and used my Woods light.   The U.V. light was invented by Robert Woods, so you literally could be in a “Wood Beam”.  I Shivered me timbers, “worth the cold”, and the light made the Pine Tar, “Tary Scan t” glow like a hundred eyes staring at me in the “pitch” black darkness.  Upset like a newbie searcher, I e-mailed Forrest saying “it’s all eyes…it’s all lies”.   Until the next day when I sat next to the tailings and noticed two things. A chute out, “Shoot Out” as on page 36, that Y’d into 2 chutes, as in Forrest’s “Pair a’ chutes, where he was shot down twice.
    I gave up on the tailings.  But it still might be the spot.  Steel Plates litter the area, which could relate to the Babe Ruth clue. The metal was “brazed”  when it was cut, and remember Forrest is a “Brazier”, a person who works with brass.
9)  Bar B Que.  Again, I believe food is the final clue.  And the poem revolves around food, drink and entertainment.
     I am confident on my solution.Forrest once said “people don’t cry anymore”, or something along those lines. Look at the stories in T.T.O.T.C.   We have Pie , Pilots, Pioneers , Pirates.  Do the Y thing.  Wipe Eye, Wipe Eye Lots , Wipe Eye on Ear , Wipe Eye Rate.
     What goes with gin?  Tonics.  White Onyx?
  And finally for those searching Lake Hebgen.  Here is one for you.  Bessies tail was a FLY SWATTER. On page 121 of T.T.O.T.C., we have FLY WATER , and the story about Skippy’s electric fly zapper, he is refered to as the “General”.  Meaning 1) General Electric ,  or 2) that would mean HE BE GEN.    So there you have it.  Butterfly or Flutter by ,  Forrest is telling us to use a play on words.  C how  that works?
   Back to word play. When Forrest said not to mess with my poem , he meant don’t eat with it , as in mess hall. But here is another story he tells us to use word play. The ball of string.  Mostly whyte string .  With mother looking for the postman..  Another word for string is twine , and being inside, it was inner twine. And another word for postman is letter carrier.   Inner twine and letter carry.
   Another thing Forrest uses are cliches’.  Starting with you can’t judge a book by its cover.  Hmmm.  Here is where it gets crazy. Look at the word “CHASE”.  Now,  look at it like this….See H as E.   By looking at that H as a E , it turns into  CEASE . You can do this in reverse too. Next is the letter C ,which can be pronounced as a S , as in Seattle, or “C”attle.
    Forrest said we need to be in tight focus on a word that is key, but he never said it in the poem .  I believe that word is “WHISKEY”. And the word that is IT ,  is WHY, or simply a Y.   Hence, Y is it, WH is key…..why is it whiskey.  The answer of course is distilling, where steam condenses , just like the rain.  But the Y is it . “If you’ve been Y’s” and  “So Y is it”.  Here is what you do.  Put Y in front of a word to create a different word .  Taos is my word of choice.  YTaos becomes white house, or in Spanish, “Casa Blanca”.  The Y Rosetta Stone becomes “wire rows set a stone”.  Y Puppy becomes….well you got the idea.

Eden

     The county I search is Rio Arriba” meaning river above. One more play on words is the Spanish word Que , pronounced “Kay”.  This is huge once you find the blaze. The reason being is the final clue is all about food . To be more precise, Bar b que.  Remember the todo over BoB wire and BarB  wire ? BB wire .Its the grates he is talking about. BB Grates.  The miss spelling of the Baby Ruth candy bar for instance is a reference to grates and grills.  And you can’t think Texas without thinking bar b que.  Remember, Forrest said it is in the poem for all to see…..”B”een wise and found the “B” laze look “Q”uickly down.  Or would that be Quigly Down?  “Put another shrimp on the bobby”. Shakespeare is mentioned by Forrest….2 B (BB) or not 2B , that is the QUEstion.   Remember Texas A&M was a all male school(Men U). But here is the kicker. It all has to do with the Last Supper Table , or as Forrest calls it, “The Great Banquet Table of History”.
Now I already feel I’ve given away the farm. But not totally.  I feel I have narrowed it down to a 1/2 acre.  And I only showed you where to BEGIN.  There is alot of looking between there and Ojo , or where ever.

Fenn’st in

But here is why I believe this small, fenced in enclosure is the Holy Grail.  The whole enclosure is the blaze.  Simply put ,  BE LAZ E. …or, since Y is it,  BE LAZ Y.    The area is Forrest Fenns Forest Fence For Rest. Along with everything required.
    1) Two Chase Lounge Chairs

Two Chase Lounge Chairs

    2) A Dart Board

Dart Board, Posts and One of the Fire Pits

    3) Two Fire pits w/ Fire Rings (Stones)

Just the way I Found it

    4) Post(s) Marked for tanning hides
    5) BBQ Grates and Grills
    6) The Last Supper Table

The Last Supper Table

Now ask yourselves as I have, WHY.  Why are these items out in the middle of no where?  There is not a single NO TRESPASSING sign anywhere. Could it relate to “title to the gold”?  Could the meaning behind “Tea with Olga” have to do with the “proper tea” or the “property”? The story combines both, along with putting  TE with OLGA and getting OL GATE . Yes my spot has an old gate, with tires….it’s a tired ole gate.

But let me go into detail:
1) The lounge chairs. This is where you do that “see H as E ” thing again, turning that E  back to an A.  ” Look Quickly Down Your Quest 2 CEASE.  Change Cease back to Chase.  “YOUR QUEST,  2 CHASE”….the chase lounge chairs.
2) The dart board is key.  Remember Forrest saying you have to join the Indiana Jones Club?  Diana in Spanish is Dartboard or Bulls Eye, ….a BBQ sauce.
3)  The fire pits have always been a top choice of mine for a long time. Mainly from the original draft of the poem. Only I knew the “bones” were fish, ribs and maybe chicken, but I’m not sure as the poem reads….” If you are not chicken and in the wood”…..come on people. Forrest is from Texas. Beef is whats on the menu, and maybe whats at the end of his Rainbow….trout. And a lot of stories on “firings”,  Frosty etc….

My Rainbow

4)  All though out  the book are Post Marks.  Male Scent Marked Post.  What I believe the posts with marks on them are used for, is for tanning hides.  And it ties right in with getting a spanking by father, and sliding down the fire escape. Both tanned his hide.
5)  The Grate Seal of New Mexico ,  Babe Ruth, a BB Grate, YRose set a stone,  “Brave and in the Wood”…(getting grilled in the wooden witness box”), plus a ton more. The food thing goes on forever.   So why is it that i must go And Leave my Trove F or All To Seek.  Notice the capital letters spell , “SALT FATS”,  “but tary scant with marvel gaze” …(Buttery Skin w/ Marvelous Glaze).  And see how easy it is to get TARIAKI  out of “The AnsweR I Already Know I”ve………”.   Not to mention “SO Y is it”.  So I would say there is something up with sauces, and therefor, the person saucing would be a saucer ? Hold that thought.
Finally, #6.  The Supper Table. Forrest said he would meet at the Great Banquet Table upon his death. He also said he would die “dye” and leave his bones “fish” at a certain spot, which sounds like the 1st draft version. Which is why  “Below the Stones” is a prime location for hiding his trove. But the table. A 12′ x 4′  White Table, an exact replica of the one Christ used. Sitting out there in the sun.
     And Finally, back to saucers.  I’ve asked myself,  Why is this spot so special to Forrest?
 I asked him at the Fennbouree if he believed in flying saucers. He said he did , but he may have confused what I meant, with the ones Peggy had thrown at him over the years. But could it be?  Remember he flew over Washington D.C. in 1954.  The sighting over the White House was 1952.  The Taos chamber of commerce puts out a magazine called DISCOVER TAOS……Hmmm  DiscOver YTaos.  Wow.

 

DiscOver YTaos

I never would have believed

   And so after 9 trips from Seattle in my 1986 BMW, “Bills Mechanical Wonder”,  I still don’t have the chest.

Bill’s Mechanical Wonder

   And I encourage you to use these ideas where ever your searching.  Get a THESAURUS, try anagrams,  HE’S AU RUST….(AU = Gold), “he’s gold rust”, meaning the golden cow around the time of Charlton Heston,…er…Moses.  My BE-GINers Spanish-English dictionary is my most used book. You will discover so many new pathways it will blow you away.  Like how Frosty was a big hunk of a dirty name and the smell assaulted my sensitivities. The Spanish word for sense of smell is Olfato.   Change the way you see words. ORIONS BELT.  Or rye on Be L T……Tai Chi,  Chai Tea.
   Forrest chooses his words meticulously.  He knows I play with the Y.    So after he razzed Cynthia for not inviting him on a hunt, I invited him to join me. His e-mail back read “Not Me Bill”…of course I saw right away, that placing that Y between Not  Me,  he was saying “No Tyme”.
  The whole enchilada has to do with wit. K?   Que:  which -who   what – which   than – that  . This according to my Spanglish dictionary. …Which Which ?     Witch Which….  See H as E.    whiE and wite.   Why and White.    I just can’t tell you any more. But that’s the way I have learned to play a game with no rules.     Good Luck in the Ch as E.
Seattle Sullivan-

Reading the Blaze – Part Three

SUBMITTED JULY 2017
by DWRock

 

The End is the Beginning 

I returned home 100% confident that I had identified the treasure location as Otter Creek.  I even told a few friends who inquired about my trip: “I didn’t find the treasure, but I know where it is… or where it was.”  Of course, the response was: “So when are you going back to get it?”  Whenever I speak with authority my partner, Ruthie, makes it her job to question my statements.  She claims that I must have gotten my degree at MSU, but she doesn’t mean Montana State University.  I think I have pretty good intuition and logic, and often the truth is no more than a believable hypothesis that hasn’t been proven false yet.  Isn’t this the scientific method?  Ruthie was understandably steamed that I left her with the baby for ten days only to return distracted and anxious to head back out.  When she finally sat through my full explanation of the Otter Creek solve she promptly denied its plausibility: “There is no way that any searchers got within 200 feet of that spot on accident!”  This sounded familiar.  This exact thought had driven me from the search area just when I had gotten so close!  My epiphany at the airport had finally allowed me to connect Otter Creek to the final lines of the poem like I had hoped to.  I admired the fit so well that I was ready to forget about this doubt until Ruthie slammed it back on the table.  Now I could not ignore it.  My confidence in Otter Creek began to fade.

Truth told I had no reason to be so confident.  I had a tight solve of the second and third stanzas that provided enough guidance to create the blaze mentioned at the start of the fourth stanza. After that my interpretation of the poem was spotty… and the idea that the treasure was hidden somewhere along the path of the blaze seemed to fall short of its potential… an almost unpoetic end.  The moment Otter Creek dissolved I shifted my eyes across the map to the end and beginning of the blaze at the Upper/Lower Falls. At one glance the fourth stanza was unlocked.  After mentioning “the blaze” the poem reads: “Look quickly down, your quest to cease”.  Cascade Creek is the final tribute to the Yellowstone River before it plunges into the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone.  An aerial or map view of the section of waters between Upper and Lower Falls reveals the spine of a lower case letter “f”, perfect in both proportion and orientation when viewed in alignment with the cardinal directions.  Cascade Creek comes in from the west at just the right point to suggest the ideal horizontal cross bar to complete the “f”!  The word cascade could replace “quickly down” suggesting that the searcher look at Cascade Creek.  The next line, “tarry scant with marvel gaze”, may refer to Crystal Falls.  This waterfall drops Cascade Creek into the pre-canyon “f” area where it joins with the Yellowstone.  The sixth stanza of the poem begins: “Hear me all and listen good” suggesting that the searcher listen to the next words.  The next line begins with: “your effort…” which can be heard as “f” Fort.  Crystal Falls is much smaller than its neighbors but has character and mystique.  It is captivating to watch it pour out of a broken notch in a sheer wall of rock that looks like the wall of a castle or a fort. The pre-canyon gorge shaped by and containing the watery “f” is like a fortress with access limited by steep banks to the east and west and impassable waterfalls to the north and south.  What’s more, the walls of this “f” Fort are complete with perimeter walkways and observation decks, like turrets, at the brink of each of the larger falls.

I was lost on the interpretation of the remainder of the sixth stanza including “…will be worth the cold” and “brave and in the wood”… but with the “f” Fort I had something more convincing than Otter Creek that kept me feeling hot on the chase.  I recalled that Forrest signs his last name with a little dot in what would be the northwest quadrant of the “f”.  I wondered if this dot might indicate the exact spot within the “fort” that the treasure is hidden. I speculated that a searcher might have to get wet to access this quadrant giving meaning to “worth the cold”. Once there the chest might be found “in the wood”.

Five weeks after returning home from my first trip I awoke pre-dawn back at Eagles Creek campsite… I drove in the dark arriving at the Canyon by sun-up.  My first objective was to survey the “f” Fort from all of the surrounding observation points and paths.  I wanted to identify any potential hide locations in the pre-canyon gorge.  I expected the hide spot would be a wooded area that Forrest could have traveled to without being spotted by onlookers.  I began at the brink of Lower Falls.  I noted that the entire length of the “f” spine created by the Yellowstone was open to view from one point or another along the walkway ruling out the unlikely river crossing.  From those same vantages I scanned the east bank which runs steeply down about 200+ feet from Uncle Tom’s Trail to the river.  It is generally wooded but with bands of open grassy gaps between the groupings of trees.  Continuous cover might be an issue in accessing that side, and the grade of the slope was more than I thought 80 year old Forrest would have been up to.  Next I drove to the brink of Upper Falls parking area and walked out to the Crystal Falls overlook. This is where I thought the poem suggested that I “tarry scant”.  I tarried and could see trail workers starting work on the bridge that crosses Cascade Creek just above the falls.  From there I followed an old worn trail that begins to descend the end of the ridge toward the river and then switches back to a rocky drainage gully that leads down to lower Cascade Creek.  I stepped into the gully but the rocks were wet and slippery with the morning dew.  I decided to retreat and continue my perimeter surveillance which included a visit to the brink of Upper Falls and a walk along the Uncle Tom’s Trail. A sick feeling of lost inspiration set in as my doubts about this area were renewed and solidified.  It seemed unlikely that Forrest would have attempted the moderately challenging descent into the “f” Fort; unlikely that he would have chosen this highly public area as a final resting place; and unlikely that he would have been able to pull off the hide with confidence that had been unwitnessed.

With the wind out of my “f” Fort sails, I paddled quickly for Otter Creek.  The grass had died back significantly in the past month allowing for an easy walk alongside the creek all the way to the wood.  I had a 10×10 inch cardboard box folded up in my pack that I intended to assemble and photograph in the suspicious depression I had found on my first trip. I looked all around the area and was unable to relocate it.  I did see several other sunken spots in the earth near the creek and decided that the one that had caught my eye previously was common and due to the settling of earth from undercutting erosion.  I walked up and down both sides of the creek much farther into the wood than on my previous visit, but ultimately I concluded that the secret spot would be a more specific location pointed to by the poem.  Surprised by how quick the return to the car was, I almost regretted not traveling further in, but I rested on the decision that the treasure was not, nor ever had been, up Otter Creek.

My next move was to examine Cascade Creek on either side of the road upstream from Crystal Falls.  The “f” Fort seemed ever unlikely but I still considered the possible interpretation of the line: “look quickly down” as “look Cascade Creek”.  As I descended to where the creek passes under the road I could smell and then see a large culvert tunnel constructed of creosote infused timbers…”in the wood”?  I donned a cheap pair of hip waders and a headlamp and walked a short way into the tunnel before reason caught up and let me know how ridiculous this was.  By the time I made it out one of the plastic waders was filling up and I removed it just before the water reached the top of my boot.  I then followed the creek down to within sight of the bridge and work crew upon it.  Uninspired I returned to the car.  I briefly dropped down the other side of the road to gaze further up Cascade Creek, but I had already lost interest in the direction.

It was only mid-day so I made a return trip to the rock wall on Wolf Lake Trail. Walking in along the meandering meadow-banked Gibbon River I was reminded of how ideal this setting seemed for Forrest’s purposes.  The obvious issue was its close proximity to the trail.  The rock wall appears like the wall of a fortress, and I noted that it bends approximately into the shape of an “f”!  If “the cold” in the poem was a reference to nearby Ice Lake, then this could be the “f” Fort.  I walked along the bank of the river viewing the full length of the rock wall. My assessment was that this place was too close to an established trail, and I saw nothing in the wall that drew my interest enough to warrant closer inspection.

The next loose end I checked was Silver Cord Cascade Overlook. The trailhead is marked by the large and solitary Glacial Boulder that sits along the road leading from North Rim Drive out to Inspiration Point.  The word “cascade” in Silver Cord Cascade had caught my attention for the same reason that Cascade Creek interested me: “look quickly down”.  It seemed like a long shot, but I was in long shot mode.  As I walked the trail toward the best viewing area for Silver Cord Cascade I spotted an arrowhead shape that had been intentionally cut in the bark of pine tree on the west side of the trail. It looked like it could be about the age of the treasure hunt so I quickly broke off trail in the direction it pointed.  I looked for another similar marking but finding nothing I returned to the trail and continued to the overlook. I stood gazing at the thin line of falling water.  I didn’t know where to go next.  I had done most of what I had planned to do and it was still the first day!

I returned to the Crystal Falls overlook about 5 pm and watched the work crew walk off the job.  It was time to penetrate into the Fort!  I descended the rocky gully that was now dry and safely navigable.  I followed the last thirty or so feet of Cascade Creek to its terminus into the Yellowstone River. I found a human boot print, bear paw print, and deer hoof print all heading in different directions in a solitary small patch of wet sand!  I peered into some rock alcoves and gazed across the Yellowstone to at a flat grassy area on a large boulder at the base of the steep wooded bank below Uncle Tom’s Trail.  I darted my way back up creek toward the base of Crystal Falls.  It was easy to rock-hop over Cascade Creek without getting wet or “cold”.  I was now in the northwest quadrant of the “f”.  I continued toward the base of the falls creeping into a small grouping of mature trees.  There within I found a pyramidal stone cairn that stood about knee high. Was this it!  “Brave and in the wood”!!  I promptly dismantled the cairn and scraped at the surface of the earth underneath.  Due to my firm assumption that the treasure is not buried I felt no need to dig.  It was difficult to be sure from down there at a time when no one was on the surrounding trails, but it felt like I was almost constantly exposed to view.  I stalked around the northwest quadrant a bit more taking a close look at the base of Crystal Falls and then climbed up a forty foot rise to an overlook of the Cascade Creek – Yellowstone River juncture.  I returned up the rocky gully to the trail and headed back toward the parking area but could not leave without a quick walk out to the bridge over Crystal Falls.  I stared into the dark cavernous recess in which the water pools before the brink.  If it were warmer I would have been tempted to dip in there to explore, but not for search reasons.  The whole of the “f” Fort now felt verified as irrelevant to the search due to exposure from the surrounding popular walking paths and overlooks.  My long day was done, and it seemed my chase was done, too.

My body was tired and my mind in gridlock.  I decided to start the next day on a road trip away from Yellowstone to allow my thoughts to unravel.  My original arrowhead trajectory distantly crossed over MacDonald Pass on the Continental Divide Trail (quest two seas) near Helena, MT.  The extended axis of my current version would miss by ten miles to the east, but I had heard good things about the pass so I decided: “why not?”  Three hours on the road and I pulled into a small parking area on a grassy bald with a couple of communication towers nearby.  The cold wind was blowing so hard I had to hold strongly to the door as I stepped out to prevent damage to the rental car.  I had no other plan but to look around the pass and walk at least a couple hundred feet down the CDT.  The trail quickly entered the woods where the air was still and I was able to relax and enjoy my surroundings.  I spotted wildlife, found old trees covered in green moss, walked past impressive boulder fields alongside the trail, and admired groves of aspens with yellow leaves.  The tall pines rubbed together, creaking and chirping as the wind blew their tops.  It felt like the first day of fall, everything was crisp and clear. I walked about four or five miles, much further than I had anticipated, until I came to a large bald that rose slightly higher than the parking area on the pass.  I admired the long range views.  The wind had lightened up and the sun warmed the air.  It was a beautiful hike and a good break.

On the drive home my thoughts returned to the search.  I reviewed my interpretation of the poem: the first clue “begin it where warm waters halt” provides the general direction to go to Yellowstone; the second clue indicates more specifically to go to “the canyon”… The following lines drive the creation of the arrowhead blaze overlaying the park map to be used as a treasure map.  The “blaze” begins and ends at “the canyon down”.  Immediately after mentioning the blaze the poem indicates “look quickly down your quest to cease, but tarry scant with marvel gaze, just take the chest and go in peace”.  At the Canyon area, the North Rim Trail offers a series of overlooks which in order are named: Lookout Point, Grand View, and Inspiration Point.  I realized that these might correlate to the poem’s lines: Lookout = “look quickly down”; Grand View = “marvel gaze”; and Inspiration = to breathe in or “take the chest”.  This interpretation seemed to direct the searcher down the North Rim Trail past Grand View to Inspiration Point. I knew that Inspiration Point was closed for construction, and that the North Rim Trail was barricaded after Grand View, but I could access the surrounding woods from the available road to Glacial Boulder.  I had a plan for the next morning!

I was almost back to Gardiner with some daylight left, so I decided to check out an old loose end: a third “home of Brown” I had once considered for the arrowhead’s tip.  The process of subduction and upheaval that created the Rocky Mountains resulted in the interesting feature that is Devil’s Slide. This steep swooping vertical swath of exposed red iron oxide looks like a giant slide. It is easy to perceive a connection to Forrest’s “old iron fire escape” story in the TTOTC book.  Adding to the intrigue of this feature are a couple of fortress-like walls to the left of the slide which are hard bands of rock that were once horizontal and now are turned vertical. To get a closer look I drove off the main road and over the bridge at Corwin Springs. The boundary of the old Royal Teton Ranch barred access to the slide with NO TRESSPASSING signs posted on the intermittent fence posts. The RTR seemed long out of business… Much of the barbed wire was missing or lying on the ground beside the posts. Vacated buildings nearby bearing the RTR name include a large hacienda by the main road that has the appearance of a ghost town or an old forgotten movie set.  I could have easily walked past the old fence, but I decided to stay on my side as I did not know who or what entity was current custodian of the property.  I spent the hour before dusk walking close to the road below Cinnabar Mountain and watching the setting sun illuminate Dome Mountain and the other mountains and cliffs enclosing this beautiful Yellowstone River valley.

I was up again before dawn and quickly broke camp tossing the tent in a loose heap in the back of the car.  I figured that after an hour drive to the Canyon area I had two or three hours search time before I needed to pack it in for the airport.  I parked on North Rim Drive as near to Inspiration Point as possible and walked along the access road making intermittent forays into the woods toward the North Rim Trail. I mainly sought high points hoping to find an attractive vista or some compelling connection to the final lines of the poem.  I thought more about the sixth stanza of the poem and realized that I may have underestimated its complexity.  From “Your effort will be worth the cold” I had extracted the identity of the “f” Fort which served to validate my recent interpretation of the fourth stanza, but had no idea what to do with the rest of the line.  Now it struck me that “worth” could mean “equal to” or “even with” or “level with”, and “the cold” could refer to the Glacial Boulder near Inspiration Point!  I walked around the large solitary boulder and expanded my circling to the nearby woods with focused interest in the tops of the small rises that were more or less level with the top of the boulder. I had had a good idea, but it was underdeveloped and the searching felt loosely directed.  I soon tired and returned to the car.  I was running low on inspiration but still had over an hour left to play with.

It was hard for me to feel convinced that the “f” Fort was not part of the solution. When I was down in the “f” Fort I had looked across the river to a flat grassy area on top of a large boulder. This inviting platform and the steep slope above it were loosely wooded and I believed it could be descended under fairly continuous cover.  I drove to the Uncle Tom’s parking area, walked along the path, and dropped carefully down some two or three hundred feet of slope to the river.  I enjoyed a needed break on the flat topped boulder, and did briefly contemplate a square patch of de-vegetated brown earth right there in the middle of the grass, about 10 x 10 inches square, but I had learned my lesson in that kind of silly fantasy!  By the time I returned to the car I had less than an hour to burn. I began to feel the loss of my part in the chase.  I had a nagging thought and drove to the Wapiti Lake Trailhead.  I wanted to look at the kiosk map.  By coincidence I would end both my search trips at the same exact place!  My greatest fear going into this second trip was that I would end it in the same way as the first: with some sense of epiphany bringing a new variation to my solution that would lure me back again to this place and compel my family and friends to believe that I had become obsessed or insane or both.  This fear was realized as I studied the map at the kiosk.  The loose ends I that I had spent the morning toying with seemed to tie together into a final compelling “what-if?”, and I didn’t have time to investigate it!

DWRock-