The Totem Cafe……

July 2017

by JR Richardson

 

I thought with the discussion I see from time to time on the Totem Café in West Yellowstone when hunting the treasure, it may be of interest to seekers to know a bit more history on this business – many people have walked through its doors and perhaps something about it does hold a clue to the blaze… ☺

The Totem Café is no more, but the building still stands and parts of the original building are still in place. It is now Bullwinkle’s at 115 Canyon Street. The metal sign at the apex of the roof is the original sign from the Totem, it has just been repainted to say Bullwinkle’s. Jackie and Dennis LaFever purchased the building from Jim and Marcia Gray in 2006, it had been with the Grays since about 1976. Marcia originally acquired the Totem in 1972, when she was married to Jack Tremaine. Jack was killed in an accident in 1974 on Denny Creek Road and Marcia married Jim Gray a few years later.

When purchased in 1972, there were cabins next to the cafe’ that lined the alley (known as “B Pkwy” on maps) but Marcia used those for crew housing instead of rentals. They were eventually sold or torn down, with the exception of one that became a Rock Shop for Ken and Ione Guyse on the Totem property. The original Totem building at that time had attached living quarters behind it. Around 1973 or ’74 the living room of those quarters was turned into a game room for playing live poker and an entryway was cut out to allow access to it from the Totem Lounge at the rear of the building. Jack and Marcia had poker chips made with “Totem Club” embossed above the denominations. The rear outside access was changed also, with entry from the parking lot into the “Game room” via what used to be the entry to the living quarters. Because this door was not easily visible to the bartender in the lounge, a set of ‘jingle bells’ was attached so people entering the building could be heard. If you visited the Totem anytime from the mid-70’s for the next 30 years, and you came in through the back door, you probably came in through the “Jingle Bell door”.

Prior to 1972, the owners were Bill and Eulah Gray. Jim Gray, who married Marcia after Jack’s death, was their son. So it was still ‘in the Gray family’ so to speak after 1976.

Now I will do my best to recall what I can, but this history was before my time so might have some errors; I believe Bill and Eulah bought the Totem from Frosty and Ramona (Jochimsen) Tornes (maybe the same Frosty in Forrest story). I don’t know who they bought it from, or if they were the original builders. I understand the original building was constructed in 1937.

At some point in the late 40’s or early 50’s the building was moved to its current location from further South on Canyon St., I believe south of Madison Avenue. I have always thought it was located about mid-block on the same side of the street as it is now, in the vicinity of alley “A Pkwy” on West Yellowstone maps (that’s a guess).

Totem Cafe circa 1940- Photo by Chris Schlechten from the Museum of the Rockies Collection

There are 2 old photographs posted with Museum of the Rockies Photo Archive Online http://www.morphotoarchive.org/), you can do a search by location (on the left under Image Database Searches, By Location), select West Yellowstone and find the photographs there. The cabins, which I assumed moved with the building, can be made out in these photos. My hunch is this is how the Totem looked, and this was the location, that Forrest worked at, although I do not know that for sure.

I lived in West Yellowstone from the 1960’s to 1983, my mother was Marcia Gray. We lived for years behind the Totem, it was my second home literally. I went back in 2002 to 2005 and ran the business when my mother was living in Helena, MT. When TTOTC was published, I was stunned that Forrest had worked at the Totem, but so many of the stories Forrest told were up close and personal to me having lived in West Yellowstone for so many years.

The Totem changed names from time to time (not necessarily officially) over the years as new areas were added to the business. It started as Totem Café, had a game room later as the Totem Club. Then was known as Totem Restaurant and Lounge. You will also see Totem Restaurant and Deli, sometimes with “Liquor Store” added in. Later it was Totem Restaurant and Casino Bar. I have noted there are matchbook covers for sale from time to time on the internet from the Totem. While they all look very similar (my mother kept the original cover design pretty much the same as it was when she purchased the business), I can tell what “Totem era” the book was printed in by the words on the cover. If it says “Cabins” or has a 4 digit phone number, it’s old.

I have read some stories sent to Dal from searchers who feel the Totem is a key in the hunt for the treasure. Indeed, the streets of West Yellowstone have mystery names – there is a Canyon, a Madison, a Firehole, and other names that may lead a seeker to find a path to the blaze. If you are in West Yellowstone, and are curious about the Totem, stop in at Bullwinkle’s and have a beer or coke in the small lounge at the back of the restaurant in the original ‘A’ frame building. The wooden bar is one of the original parts left from the Totem. There is also a salad bar made of white rock against one wall – this was built by Jack around 1973 and hasn’t changed from its original construction that I know of. I haven’t been in there recently but would like to go this summer and see what a wonderful refurbishing that Jackie has done.

If you want some fun, tell Jackie you are curious about the ‘Spiderman room’. When I was living in the attached quarters around 1975, my room was a windowless square that adjoined the bathroom. I loved Spiderman (what teenager doesn’t), and to dispel the gloom of no window, I painted a life-sized caricature of him on my cinderblock wall. Every day was a good day to wake up and see Spidey slinging a web across the room. This picture was still remaining when Jackie bought the Totem. Sometime, (I am thinking about 2011), he had to be covered up finally to make way for renovations. She sent a picture to my mother just before he was painted over, with the painters hanging out next to him. He had been slinging the same web for over 35 years. His presence is only known to a few, as he was tucked away in a secret spot, like the treasure we all seek.

Good hunting, hope this was interesting for a few readers!

JR Richardson

 

Jonsey sent along these images from an early Totem Cafe menu in her vast collection of Forrest related artifacts.

Thanks Jonsey-

On Quitting the Chase…

by Ken S.

Warning – this is verbose and long winded.

I have only been at “The Chase” for a little over five months now starting in December, 2016.  I realize I am a late comer to the party.  I have not been out in the mountains yet because we still have snow down to the 5,000’ 6,000′ level here in Montana.  I was raised in south central MT and YNP has been in my backyard my whole life.  Many of you have been at this for years and it has changed your lives and, in some cases, how you now live your lives.

For me, and for most of you, all I can think of any more is “The Poem” of clues.  I think of it as soon as I wake up in the morning.  I recite the poem throughout the day.  Nearly every night I review different websites for new clues.  I stay up way too late looking at GE, the thesaurus, dictionary, and topo maps.  I have had several “solves”, most of which “work” to some degree or another.  For me, it is consuming and I want to/need to stop.  I have many other things I need to do and think about.  I hope in giving away what I have learned so far, I can maybe get this Chase out of my head.  Really, the best way for that to happen is for someone to find the chest!

In this monolog I am going to give most all of my solutions to clues I have found in the poem.  And, yes, I find more than nine clues in the poem.  As some have said, maybe each sentence counts as a clue, but within each sentence there may be several sub-clues (you can call them hints if you want, but I will refer to everything as clues for ease of typing).  I am not going to quote or cite blog posts or videos but will trust my memory of what I have read on different websites, primarily this one.  I know many of you will shoot holes in my logic and thoughts, that’s OK.  Some of you will discount me because I haven’t referenced ff quotes.  But, maybe some of my thoughts will nudge someone else into a different line of thinking, as do many of the blog posts I have read from others.  Btw: I am  a poem purist, I have not purchased the book(s).  Line by line, here goes:

As I have gone alone in there
Alone could mean Lone Wolf, Lone Star Geyser (ff is from TX), Lone Mtn near Big Sky, MT.  I only developed one solve based on this line.  Btw, there is a Fenn couple that own land at Big Sky, MT (public record).  I don’t know if they are related to ff.

And with my treasures bold,
Treasures Bold could be the creeks that flow into the Lamar River including the adjacent creeks called Jasper, Amethyst, Agate, Crystal, Opal, Chalcedony, and Flint.  All are treasured gems.  Their creek names are bold on a topo map in the area.  I have two solves that use this phrase as a clue.

I can keep my secret where,
I have found no clues in this phrase.

And hint of riches new and old.
The word old may refer to a historic mining district.

Begin it where warm waters halt
There are warm waters all over the west and in the Rocky Mtns.  I have considered mostly those only in my area of familiarity.  In YNP I considered both Soda Butte Cr. and less warm Rose Cr. in the Lamar Valley.  Neither are hot springs.  Soda Butte is warm and Rose does not freeze in winter.  I also considered the Firehole River, the Boiling River, Corwin Springs, the hot springs at Thermopolis, WY, and in the Shoshone River at Cody, WY.

WWWH could also refer to the geographic borders of YNP, but does it mean inside YNP or outside YNP?  Soda Butte and Lamar flow from the boundary inward, Firehole/Madison, Snake, and Gardiner/Yellowstone, flow outward.

Thermopolis, WY is well below the elevation of the chest hiding place but the poem doesn’t say you have to decrease in elevation.  I used Thermopolis as the start point for a solve that looks at the really “big picture”.

And take it in the canyon down,
Different canyons that I have thought of in my solves are Lamar River Canyon, Icebox Canyon, Gardner R canyon, Yankee Jim Canyon, Firehole/Madison R canyon, Yellowstone River canyon, Big Horn R canyon, Clear Cr. canyon in Colorado, and canyons that head south (down) on a map (only those which are associated with warm or hot springs).

Not far, but too far to walk.
This phrase is so very subjective.  Even though ff was 79 or 80 yo, I have hiked long hard miles with people that age.  It also depends on the altitude and terrain.  It is ten hard miles from Buffalo Ranch to Lamar R joining the Yellowstone R.  It is several miles from Boiling River to Yankee Jim Canyon.  My interpretation for this is that ff probably walked no more that six miles total on his two round trips to hide the treasure.  The higher the altitude the less the mileage would have been.  Similarly, if he was bucking brush versus walking through high park grass, the effort and distance would be much different.

Put in below the home of Brown.
I have a few different HOBs.  I borrowed from the blog for using the Lamar R. and Buffalo Ranch.

Along the Big Horn River just above Sheep Canyon there is a long-operating bentonite plant owned by the Brown Family.

Brown could also be Brown’s Lake east of Fort Collins for those looking in the Estes Park area.

I also thought of the sewage lagoons below Gardiner and the Grizzly Adventure in W. Yellowstone.

And, here is a doozy:  In one translation I found the word Brown has a Spanish translation as the verb “doarse” meaning ‘turn, turn about, turn around’.  But, in most Spanish dictionaries “doarse” means “to turn brown, or golden” such as for sauteed food.  So, doarse is a pretty weak interpretation of Brown, but . . .

From there it’s no place for the meek,
This one is also subjective depending on one’s personal fears – or maybe it refers to a place where the meek would not be found.  At first blush I thought this meant that “You are going to have to work for it.  It’s not easy”.  Or, it could be a scary place – bears, wolves, buffalo, rattlesnakes, guarded private property, nasty switch back roads, nasty park rangers?  Could meek be a religious reference (inherit the earth).  If so, could it be related to a church camp or mountain chapel?)  The Big Horn River cuts through both Sheep Mtn. and Little Sheep Mtn and sheep are referenced in literature to be meek animals.  Meek is associated with timid so maybe “no place for the meek” is associated with the antithesis such as Devil’s Slide, Hell Creek, wolf, etc.

The end is ever drawing nigh;
Some of the blog posts suggest this as meaning “to the left” so some of my solves used it that way.  Others did not.  For my Thermopolis, WY solve I interpreted it as the Shoshone River which enters the Big Horn R just below the Sheep Canyons after its run from the YNP west entrance down through Cody, WY

There’ll be no paddle up your creek,
As with most I interpret this as a small stream or dry creek bed.  It could also mean a stream with heavy rapids that cannot be ascended even by kayak.  This could mean the Shoshone River through Cody, WY.  Also, paddling is not allowed in YNP, nor can Lamar R be paddled upstream in the canyon portion because of the close boulders.  This could also mean to bypass Slough Creek which is the only creek with substantial water flowing into Lamar R.  It could also mean Crystal Creek which is one of the “gems” streams with very little water that flows into the Lamar.

Just heavy loads and water high.  
This could mean the large boulders in the Shoshone R as it flows from below BB dam down through Cody, WY or the heavy silt load on the Shoshone R at the BB dam, the Willwood dam, and where it flows into the Big Horn Reservoir (all in the Thermopolis solve).  I also took this to mean heavy loads of huge boulders in the rapids in the Lamar Canyon.  Water high might mean the high water mark of the Lamar (or any) river.  Water high could be where Lamar joins the Yellowstone and becomes a river too deep to cross on foot.  It could also mean any alluvium, especially braided – can’t paddle that – , at a creek’s mouth such as where it spills into a larger river)  Heavy loads (lodes) might also be referencing the many prospects and mines such as in SW Montana and along Clear Cr in Colorado.  Heavy loads and water high could mean a glacier or perennial snowbank.

If you’ve been wise and found the blaze,   
For the Thermopolis solve:  you have gone past Sage Creek (wise) as you go upstream.  The blaze is the Firefighters Memorial on Shoshone River upstream of the dam, elevation:  6190’.  This falls apart at the end because of the ff comment about no human trails in close proximity.

On the Fort Collins/Estes Park solve I was looking at a B-29 crash site that I thought ff might visit and honor because he had been a military pilot.  The B-29 trail description is to look for an Arrow on the final leg to the B-17 crash site.  For this solve I ignored it being a place ff might want to be buried.

My first solve along the Lamar R included an “owl face” along the river in the foothills between Tower Falls and Lamar Canyon.  The “eyes” are two small lakes, the beak is a small hillock south of the eyes.  The Blaze is an outcrop of white soil between and north of the eyes about 200 feet.

The Blaze could also be Tower Falls as seen from Specimen Ridge.  The Blaze could also be the Devil’s Slide above Yankee Jim Canyon.  Either type of “Blaze”, rapids or falls, could easily have a rainbow associated with the spray.  The rapids would show a rainbow most of the day with the sun to the south.  Tower Falls would only have a rainbow early in the morning with the sun to the east.  Devil’s Slide is also rainbow colored rock and soil.  Devil’s Slide is on private property but the very top end is on USFS, although quite a tough hike to access.

Blaze could also be a burned area but most of the YNP area burned up in 1988 and many subsequent years so that could mean just about anywhere in MT or WY.

Look quickly down, your quest to cease,
This phrase tells me that I am very, very close to the chest.  It is either literally at my feet or just down hill from where I am standing.  If you imagine my “owl” of pond eyes, it could mean to look at the “downy legs” and talons of the “owl” which would put it at the high water mark of the Yellowstone River across from Tower Falls.

To Cease could mean two (2) C’s such as Crystal Cr. or Cache Cr.  Two C’s could also mean the continental divide where water flow splits between the Pacific Ocean (sea) and Atlantic Ocean (sea).  But, that is just about anywhere in the Rockies in MT, WY, CO, and NM.

But tarry scant with marvel gaze,
To me, this means “Get the heck out of there before getting caught”.  That could be a situation for both NP lands or private lands.

Just take the chest and go in peace. 
I think this means “Don’t whoop & holler”, don’t tell anyone you found it until you are safe at home.  Peace could be a reference to a church camp or travel through a cemetery even though the TC is not hidden in a cemetery.  Peace could mean respect for the dead killed in the B-29 crash.

So why is it that I must go And leave my trove for all to seek?
I don’t see anything here.

The answers I already know,
I don’t see anything here.

I’ve done it tired, and now I’m weak.
I think this is telling the reader ff did the trip on rubber tires, probably by car or truck and that he was gone a week.  Of course, a week of travel could put him in any search state depending how many times he stopped and how fast he drove.

So hear me all and listen good,
Is there sound which could be a clue – water gurgling?  I liked the recent post from another Chaser of a natural amphitheater.  I thought that was a good interpretation.

Your effort will be worth the cold.
A synonym of cold is Icebox (canyon in YNP, another is Piercing such as water spray from a water falls.  It might be as simple as having to wait through the cold of winter before snow melts enough to search in the field.

If you are brave and in the wood
This could very well mean the TC is hidden in a hollow log thus easier for a child to retrieve.  Or, it could mean under a log thus easier for a child to see under.  Or, it could mean to duck under the water to get under a log jam.  In two interviews FF has said people should get out and kick over a log.  My favorite interpretation is that there is wood inside the chest that carries a “deed” to keep the findings.  Wood could also mean it is in the trees, if so, there are trees along the the high water mark at most rivers.  Brave might mean be careful of buffalo and grizzlies.  Brave could mean Warrior Mtn in the Idaho Springs, CO mining area.  Btw, there is a Santa Fe Mtn just south of I-70 near Idaho Springs and 8.25 miles north it leads one to a mountain called Fairburn.

I give you title to the gold.
A legal title for the finder could be inside the chest along with legal caveats and codicils.

Finally, I am saving two solves from you all because they are within a day’s drive from my home.  I plan to check them out if the snow ever melts.

Solve #1 – Begin at Soda Springs in YNP, travel down to Buffalo Ranch, cross the Lamar over to Crystal Creek.  Look around between the Lamar R bank and the top of the drainage.  Look for a hollow log or under a log near anything that could be a blaze.

Solve #2 – Begin at Soda Springs in YNP, travel down to Buffalo Ranch, look on GE for the Owl Eyes and forehead blaze.  Walk downhill to the Lamar R bank and look through the trees near the high water line along the river.

Solve #3 – Begin at Soda Springs in YNP, travel down to Yellowstone Picnic Area, hike up Specimen Ridge, break off from there and hike down to the Yellowstone R across from Tower Falls.  Look around the side of the draw on your way down as well as check out the high water area along the Yellowstone R.

Solve #4 – Begin at Soda Springs in YNP, travel down the Lamar R to its merging with the Yellowstone R.  Check out around the confluence area at the high water mark.  There could be a recognizable blaze in the area.

Solve #5 – Begin at Thermopolis, WY, travel down the Big Horn R and shallow BH canyon just below Thermopolis.  Travel down to where the Shoshone R flows into the Big Horn R (below the bentonite plant owned by the Brown family) at the upper end of Big Horn reservoir near Lovell, WY.  Follow Shoshone  R up through Cody, WY, up past Buffalo Bill dam and reservoir until you find the Firefighters Memorial (blaze).  It might be there but there definitely are human trails in the proximity.  Also, for some inexplicable reason, I doubt ff would use an industrial plant as HOB, then again . . .

Solve #6 – Begin at the Boiling R. south of Gardiner, MT, travel down the Yellowstone R canyon towards Yankee Jim Canyon.  Somewhere near there you will see the Devil’s Slide down the side of the mountain.  In this solve HOB is the sewer plant for Gardiner, MT – not very attractive.

Solve #7 – Start at Idaho Springs, CO.  I didn’t find a HOB here but I did find a Toledo Mine, Santa Fe Mtn, Warrior Mtn (brave), and Fairburn Mtn (blaze).  I didn’t work this one very hard.

Solve #8 – I didn’t develop this one very well.  Start at Brown’s Lake near Ft. Collins, search for a B-29 crash site in CO just west of FC.  There is one not far north of Estes Park but still outside of RMNP.  This one can be mostly driven to on FS roads but has to be walked to the last mile or so.

Solve #9 – Begin at Upper/Middle Geyser Basins, travel down the FH river canyon, turn around (Spanish verb for Brown) at the Firehole River Drive one-way sign, look around between the confluence of the FH river into the Madison and then up stream towards FH falls.

I admit all of my “solves” have holes in them.  This has been strictly arm chair stuff while I’ve been waiting for the snow to melt.  Remember, I only learned of the Chest Chase last December so have not had a chance to get out in the hills.  And, after a couple field trips, I hope I can get this out of my system.

And, finally, it has been nearly two weeks since I have read anything about Fenn’s treasure.  I think I have broken my addiction to the poem.  I think I’m back to my previous life again.

Ken S in Montana

Mountain Warrior Women’s Wicked Weekend…

SUBMITTED december 2016
by the golden retrievers and sandy b

 

Sandy B and the Golden Retrievers had an Enchanted trip while hunting for Indulgence.   We have written this article for your entertainment.  Mr. Fenn says: read the blogs for entertainment.   We aren’t sharing our solves.  Sorry.  We are just sharing our fun trip with you.  We hope you find our story entertaining.   And we hope it encourages you to get out, hike, and search (in Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado) next spring.

We rendezvoused at a trailhead at the Embudo Canyon.  We hiked down into the canyon and crossed the Treacherous River to Treasure Island (it’s not an island at all, it’s just the other side of the river – but Golden R likes to call it Treasure Island).  We traveled thru the Magical Forest, moved a few rocks, reorganized some more rocks, and repositioned a few more rocks.

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We Moved Rocks

One rock, standing up like a gravestone, caught our eye.

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Standing up like a gravestone

Sandy B and Golden R couldn’t lift the rock out of the stone crevasse which held it.  Sandy B, who has an attention span of a fruit fly, left to explore around the ridge.  Since Golden R couldn’t lift the stone; Golden R tried to crank the stone sideways, like a lever.  Golden R was shocked to feel the rock move easily like a lever . . . and four more rocks, which were holding the lever-rock in place, all moved with a crunching noise.   It was a very “Indiana Jones moment”.  Golden R expected a stone entrance to a secret tunnel to appear.  But there was no secret tunnel and no treasure chest.

We walked in and out of the river . . .  up and down the river.  When we felt we had disturbed enough rocks, we went looking for the “Heartbeat of Mother Earth”.  With our ears pressed to approximately thirty or forty different rocks, we listened good, for the heartbeat.  Golden R’s ear was turning numb from holding the ear against the cold, wet rocks  (did we tell you it was cold and it was raining?); we never heard the Heartbeat (Sancho, we needed you.)   Sandy B heard a unique hum in that area, so we know we were in the correct spot.

Another “Indiana Jones moment” came, as we arrived at our car to find a note, enclosed in a plastic bag, on our windshield, from a treasure hunter.  The note suggested we meet for Happy Hour – Oh Yes!

Sandy B and Golden R had a wonderful evening with a very handsome treasure hunter.  We probably shouldn’t disclose our guest’s real name, but we like to call him “Snakecharmer”.  We tried to get information out of our guest . . . we tried to buy drinks for Snakecharmer, hoping to learn valuable information . . . but he was a rock.  We obtained no information about his solve.  We had a very fun evening talking treasure.

The next day, we took a drive thru a very muddy canyon; and we had to scrape the mud off our tires twice, because we were sliding on the mud.  Sandy B is an amazing driver; she drove us thru mud that had tire ruts or grooves in the road twelve inches deep.  Sandy drove us out of there in 4WD LOW.   Golden R was a good luck charm for Sandy B.  Sandy B has had eight flat tires this year – on this trip Sandy B didn’t get a flat tire!

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Mud

More Mud

More Mud

We hiked a trail which promised warm waters halting, canyon down, and an X.

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X marks the spot

We found eyes, a drawing nigh, and a listen good.   We stood in one spot which has a pi to the West,

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Not pineapple pi

And a finger to our east.

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and a pure white blaze to our North.   But no treasure chest.

The rocks along the trail were so fun to climb over and climb through – it was like a playground.  But Golden R couldn’t stay and play on those rocks, because Sandy B has the attention span of a mosquito.

We then entered the strange part of our journey. This was a time where Sandy B found a broken hiking pole which displayed the word: stop (obviously “halt”).

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“Halt”, says the hiking pole

At this point, we were E.C. Watersing it.  (Before we sent this article to Dal, we received permission from E. C. Waters to turn his name into a verb meaning:  ‘find a clue in everything you see’).

We found a concrete trough.

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Water High

As we looked behind us, we saw a big water tower up high.  Why didn’t we see that as we hiked by it?

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More water high?

That was a beautiful, fun trail.  We found hot springs and saw foot prints from elk, badger and coyote (or fox).   But no treasure chest.

The next day we weren’t allowed to drive into the Vallas Caldera National Preserve, because it was hunting season; and WE WERE hunting!   So we pulled out our maps, and Sandy B discovered the BEST solve yet.   We packed part of our sandwich . . .

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Got sandwich & got flashlight

“Did we have a flashlight?”, you might ask.  Sandy B carried two or three flashlights at all times; and a rock hammer/pick axe/lever for moving rocks and scraping tires.  Golden R carried two flashlights, two different packs of matches, and two different packs of waterproof matches, and everything we needed to build a shelter if we got lost.  If we got lost, and had to spend the night in the mountains, our shelter would have been seen from the space shuttle.

On this hike we found a tiny, tiny water fall (it’s so tiny you can’t even see it in this picture below).

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There’s something weird about her right hand in this photo

Something tells me we should go this way.

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Look quickly down

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We saw recent bear scratches on a tree.

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“I was here”, Bear.

We found treasures old and new; and we did it tired.

There was no poop on that tire, Voxpops

There was no poop on that tire, Voxpops

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This old 1939 Ford needs to be re-tired

If Sandy B had been driving that truck, it never would have gotten stuck.  Sandy B can drive anywhere.

On this hike we had home of Brown; canyon down; WWWH; listen good; and X marks the spot.  So we moved some rocks, reorganized some more rocks, and repositioned a few more rocks.

No treasure chest.

We had a very fun trip; and we saw some amazing sites.  And we are getting closer and closer to the treasure chest.

Golden Retrievers and Sandy B-

 

 

In the RMs North of Santa Fe…

SUBMITTED NOVEMBER 2016
by Hear ME ALL

 

I’m sharing my first attempt at finding a solution that would lead me to the chest to show how imagination is important but also to show how even after being stuck on this for many months I did allow myself to reconsider other possibilities and options.  I realize that some will laugh, some may pick it apart, and some may see things that will make them scratch their heads.  I was convinced that this solution was feasible for many months but came to the conclusion after several failed attempts by myself and another searcher that this just was not the spot that is special to Forrest.  At the time it all seemed to make perfect sense to me.  Looking back on this and with what I now know, I scratch my own head wondering what the heck was I thinking.  I hope you enjoy and if not please be kind.

West Yellowstone, Montana

West Yellowstone, Montana

The first stanza talks about hinting of riches new and old.  When I did research on West Yellowstone which f likes to share stories about, I realized that some parts of the town are old and some to the south are fairly new.  The first stanza told me that West Yellowstone was the area that I needed to search.  F has said that most of the places the clues refer to were around when he was a kid.  That means that some came after so I attributed the new development to some clues.

Begin at Firehole Ave..  When you are stopped at the red light, there is another light for pedestrians with a hand facing out to signal them to halt.  In River Bathing is Best f said that the boiling geyser waters met with the cool waters in the Firehole River.  To me boiling waters meeting cool waters gives you warm waters.  If you are coming in to West Yellowstone from Highway 191 driving south, you will run right into Firehole Ave. and this light.

Take it in the canyon down to me hints at going south down Canyon St. from where it joins Firehole Ave.  You will just continue south from that intersection on Canyon St.  Forrest mentions Canyon St. in Totem Café Caper story.  I’ve also seen other posts from the past that suggest there was no way Forrest was going to down and back up a real canyon twice to hide the treasure.  Number one it would be a little dangerous for a man at that age and would not be fun to traverse with a load.  You have to pretend you’re in a Canyon when on the street but you really are taking it in a canyon down which is south.

Not far, but too far to walk to me simply meant I was driving.  Most if not all searchers would arrive at the first clue in a vehicle so continuing to drive instead of walk to me was an obvious choice.  I also wouldn’t want to walk through town carrying a chest filled with treasure.

Put in below the home of Brown.  To me this is the keyword.  Forrest capitalized Brown and most searchers don’t even give that much thought as it being the keyword.  I think this can be tricky as he knows people would tend to think of people named Brown, and then animals it might refer to, and on down the line.  To me it was Totem Café where the brown gravy assaulted his sense of smell.  I think Forrest enjoys having some fun and using imagination.  The put in below part came a little later for me.  When I looked up Totem Café back in February, a map came up.  It was a map of West Yellowstone.  That is when I realized that it was on Canyon St. and then noticed Firehole Ave. and started wondering if this could be the map that he has talked about.  Sure seemed that a number of things were connecting.

No place for the meek.  In my solve this was the Grizzly & Wolf Discover Center.  At some point in the past I remembered a comment from a searcher on Dal’s blog that said they thought they remembered Forrest saying bear were close by.  I’ve never come across Forrest saying that, but if that is the case this would be a pretty close place to my search area to have bear and also be not in a dangerous area since they are contained.   Also there are wolves at the center. Just south of the center is Gallatin National Forest, so if you use some imagination to pretend that you have to be brave when searching that area because of the bears and wolves that are close by it could work.  There used to be an exhibit that traveled the country that is now permanently displayed at this center. On the center’s website the article about acquiring this exhibit in 2002 says home of the world class exhibit BEARS: Imagination and Reality.  I thought that was interesting since Forrest has said that imagination is needed to solve the poem and has also said imagination is more important than knowlege.  Another thought that I had for no place for the meek was that you would not want to go down Yellowstone Ave. in accordance with Joseph Meek.

The end is ever drawing nigh.  Canyon St. dead ends shortly after the center.

There’ll be no paddle up your creek.  I never really made a strong connection with this part of the poem unless the meaning was, there is no paddle because there is no creek.  Could also mean you have to pretend you will be entering a creek where the canyon ends and no paddle will be needed.

Just heavy loads and water high.  This one took me a bit to figure out.  For the longest time I thought it was just added for filler.  Then I studied the map some more and realized that one of the streets is Electric St. so that could mean heavy loads.  Two other streets are Old Faithful and Geyser so I thought that could possibly be for the water high.  The problem with that is they are a few blocks over and not on this path.  The old water tower is also on south Electric St. and at one time I thought that could be the water high.  Here is what I think Forrest meant by heavy loads and water high.  At the end of Canyon St. sits the Worldmark resort. I came to the conclusion that the world part refers to heavy loads as in carrying the weight of the world on your shoulders.  For the water high I thought mark could refer to a high water mark.  Again I used some imagination and I’m sure many would dismiss my thinking.  You can park in the parking lot at Worldmark and go into Gallatin Forest through a break in the fence that the resort made to push winter snow off the property.

When the canyon dead ends I put in here.  Part of it is somewhat open with grass and sagebrush and some is thicker with trees.  In 1988 there was a fire that burned quite a bit of Yellowstone and close to West Yellowstone.  This area was burned in the fire.  The tallest trees in this area were probably planted a couple of years after that fire.  You can definitely see rows of trees in places.  When Forrest made some posts in the past as Forrest Fire, I thought he might have been trying to see if anyone was paying attention.  This area is not one that many frequent due to it being past a dead end.  It’s also not a spectacular looking area.  No water, or trails, just trees, sagebrush, animals, grass and a fairly safe place but you have an unusually high number of bear and wolves right next door at the center.

If you’ve been wise and found the blaze. While standing at the end of canyon I gazed around for any sign that something could be a blaze.  About 1/4 mile south I spotted something and told my son that it might be the blaze. Most might not even spot this object unless really paying attention.  It was a radio tower with a beacon light.  The word beacon is also known as a blaze.  It is visible during the day but is clearly visible at night. This made me think that Forrest long ago told everyone they might want to take a flashlight and sandwich because the blaze was more evident at night.  I believed that the blaze was the red beacon on top of the radio tower.  In My War For Me, f talks about how the blink was winking at him.  The beacon on the tower also winks.  In that story he also talks about how some place was beaconing to him.  I thought that was an odd choice for wording when he could have said beckoning.  When I considered those things it seemed to add up. Also in his book and some recent replies to questions he uses red letters.  Where I began was a red light and the blaze is also a red light.  Red is also one of the colors in the rainbow.  Could the Firehole Ave. light and the beacon light be the beginning and the end of Forrest’s rainbow?

As for the sixth stanza I thought that Hear me all referred to Radio Rd. which is south of town that goes right to the blaze.  Forrest also mentions radio a number of times in other stories.  He also used the word canned for getting fired from his newspaper job.  Canned can also refer to pre-recorded radio.  Your effort will be worth the cold if you are brave and in the wood.  I was doing some internet research before we took our first trip and was studying West Yellowstone.  West Yellowstone is located on a very cold and heavily wooded plateau so that was good enough for me.  Also if you remember back to The Totem Café Caper Story, Forrest talks about Frosty’s polarity.  West Yellowstone sits almost exactly in the middle between the North Pole and the equator.

To conclude I must say that this area south of West Yellowstone does not contain Indulgence.  I did see new country, learned new things, made memories with my son that are priceless, and learned to adjust to the poem.  I took a total of three trips to this area with only two of them allowing for searches due to the weather.  Another searcher graciously searched for me this fall as well.  He shot some video which I appreciated very much.  F is correct when he says the poem is important.  It contains so much more than what you might expect.  I learned to see not read.

Hear Me All-

 

Don and Bubba

by dal-

Don Martinez was a California real estate professional who opened a fly shop in West Yellowstone in 1932. Wisely, Don spent his winters in California but when spring hit the rivers in the Rocky Mountains and the trout began searching for new hatch to feed upon, Don headed east and unlocked the door of his one room shop on the edge of Yellowstone National Park.

Don spent a lot of his time fishing and guiding in addition to running the shop and folks who knew him claim he had a fondness for alcohol. So he wasn’t always at his small shop and generally hired a couple local boys to fill in for him.

dminmiddle

Inside Don’s shop. Don is in the middle.

His shop was stocked with a few good lines of fly-fishing gear and he tied and sold his own flies. In-fact, Don is credited with originating the now famous Woolly Worm and also with introducing dry fly fishing to that part of the country.

Unlike many retail shops, if you work in a fly shop you don’t just stand behind the counter all day waiting for customers to stroll in the door and hand you money. You spend your non-customer time tying flies… a lot of flies… because that’s what fisherman buy. No self-respecting fly fisher is going to walk out of a shop without a pocket full of hand-tied, local flies guaranteed to catch fish. It would be impolite and disrespectful.

4185449-A-collection-of-all-different-types-of-fly-fishing-dry-flies--Stock-Photo

If you are ever so blessed as to walk into a good fly shop you’ll see the usual…sleek, long poles…lightweight reels…a variety of green or brown waders and all kinds of “gadgets” to help you catch a big trout. But what generally jumps out at you are the neatly stacked rows and rows of compartmentalized bins holding hundreds of different kinds of fishing flies.

Bins of trout flies

Bins of trout flies

You’ll see streamers and buggers and dry flies and spinners with fascinating names like Zonkers and Old Adams, Royal Coachman, Bunyan Bug, Elk Hair Caddis and Sparkle Dunn, They are colorful and attractive like containers of tiny gemstones, shiny and glittering and begging to be picked up and examined…and that’s what you do in a fly shop.

A fisher is attracted to these bins of alluring flies no less so than the fish they hope to land. First you look to see what’s new…then you look to see how well they are tied. Then you begin looking to see how the local flies might be slightly different from the ones back home. Most of the flies are tied by the folks who work in the shop. A good fly tier can knock out a dozen or more flies in a single hour.

Back at Don Martinez’s fly shop, the local help Don hired in the 1940s included a tall, lanky kid known to his friends as Bubba. The kid was long on fishing skills even though he was barely in his teens, and was a good fit for the fly shop.

On one particular day Don strolled in about closing time, Bubba recalled. “I had just tied my 144th Woolly Worm of the day. I was shooting for a gross. Don looked at them and said he didn’t want them because I didn’t put silver tinsel on the bodies. He said, ‘you can have them’. So I kept every one of them and coaxed a lot of fish to the edge of disaster with those things.”

A Woolly Worm by Bubba

A Woolly Worm by Bubba. No tinsel needed.

Bubba also remembers using some of those Woolly Worms to his advantage when he was guiding. “The clients all had their fancy flies, but I always caught more fish on my Woolly Worm. Sometimes I was the only one who caught any fish at all. My other fly was the Squirrel Tail. I caught a lot of fish on it too, especially in the lakes. So I decided to make a Woolly Worm Squirrel Tail fly, which was nothing more than a Woolly Worm with some squirrel hair tied on the front. It became a famous fly and everyone called it the ‘Bubba Special’. I was a hero.”

budlily

By the time WWII was finished Don had sold his shop and retreated back to California permanently. He died in 1955 at the very young age of 52. His old shop is still in West Yellowstone. It’s Bud Lilly’s Trout Shop these days. If you wander in there be sure to gaze longingly at the fly bins and admire the Woolly Worms. Look around for a Bubba Special.

————–

CORRECTION:
Forrest generously sent some pics and corrected what I wrote about the location of Don’s shop.

It turns out that Wikipedia (where I got the info about the location of Don’s shop) is incorrect. The Bud Lilly shop shown above is the NEW Bud Lilly shop. The old one did take over Don’s old shop but Bud outgrew Don’s small space and they moved three and a half blocks away to where the shop above is now located.

yellowstoneave

Don’s shop was probably located around here on Yellowstone Ave. (from Google Earth Street View)

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A young June Fenn standing out in front of Don’s shop on Yellowstone Ave. That’s Don in the doorway. (from the Forrest Fenn collection)

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Inside Don’s shop. That’s Skippy over in the corner. (from the Forrest Fenn collection)

Don’s shop (and the original Bud Lilly shop) was located on Yellowstone Ave. about half a block east of where Eagles is today.

——————–

You won’t find Bubba over in the corner tying flies anymore. He grew up, did a few pretty cool things, and I heard he moved out to Santa Fe.

I wonder if he still has any of those Woolly Worms left?

Click the link below to:
Watch Bubba tie a Woolly Worm

dal-

Scrapbook One Hundred Forty Nine…

scrapbook

NOVEMBER 2015

A Memory Runs Through My Family

Lightning struck me today in the form of an email from someone I never met and do not know. But the history of our respective families is so entwined as to be almost umbilical.

Here is her email to me. My response to her is at the bottom.

 

Mr. Fenn
Can’t tell you how much your treasure hunt has rekindled memories of my best childhood vacation!

When I was 10, back in 1958, my family went on a fishing pack trip out of Jackson Hole, over the divide, and into the Lamar River Basin. These were the most special 10 days I can recall in all my youth. Though my mom, dad, brother and sister were there for the fishing, I have to admit I was there for the horses. I can still remember all 14 of them with names and color (how is that even possible). Our guide, Bob Adams (how do I remember that???), would get up before everyone else and catch trout for breakfast. There is nothing better to wake up to than trout for breakfast over the campfire! It was 10 glorious day in the wilderness with lots of fishing and wildlife watching!

Looking for treasure clues online brought up all kinds of Yellowstone photos and reminded how I always said I would return. Somehow I never did. Don’t know why. But now I am determined to take my trip down memory lane next summer before it is too far for me to walk! Thank you SO much for that extra push in the right direction!

In doing my research, I was looking for connections that might tell me why you used the phrase “if you’ve been wise” and found this lovely story about the Eagle family and their “right of passage” introducing the next generation to fishing the Firehole River. Subsequently I decided that there was no connection between “wise” and “Hoot Owl Hole” where the Eagle family started the younger kids fishing but it was a great story anyway. It led me to wonder if you were friends with the family as they did have an outfitting store in West Yellowstone and were themselves fishing guides in Yellowstone. Just curious. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3487577/ A River Runs Through My Family.

My real question is: if I were to happen to find the treasure and if it happened to be in Yellowstone Park, would you consider claiming it yourself and offering a finders fee? The last thing I would want would be to find it and hand it over to the government! Just askin’……

Again, thanks SO much for setting in motion an amazing adventure for thousands of individuals and families who will now have all their own stories to tell about their great treasure hunt!

Lou Ellen Williams

———-

Dear Lou Ellen,

I knew all of that old bunch in West Yellowstone, starting in about 1938, from old Sam, the patriarch to Wally, Joe, Bette, Rose, and the rest. Wally and I fished together many times on the Firehole, Gibbon, and Madison Rivers. I knew your grandmother Frankie when she was barely old enough to wear a top and even today she remains a cherished friend. I love the link you included in your email, and think I need another hankie.

If you find the treasure in YNP, tell me where it is and I’ll go get it for you so you won’t be thrown down the hole at Old Faithful.

Forrest Fenn

I Don’t Like Peas….

JULY 2015

This Letter to the Editor from West Yellowstone resident and retired librarian Jan Dunbar appeared in the West Yellowstone News in 2008. At that time Forrest was contributing articles to the newspaper much like his scrapbooks here, the stories on his blog and the stories that are in his two memoirs. Some of the stories in his memoir were originally written for the West Yellowstone News.

Below is Jan’s letter as it appeared in the 2008 West Yellowstone News. I added the photo which came from Crayton’s family photo collection.

———————-

I have enjoyed the reminiscences by Forrest Fenn lately in the News. (He probably wouldn’t like to be reminded that we called him “Bubba.”) I wasn’t acquainted with him, but I knew his sister June slightly, and his brother Skippy quite well. Skippy worked as a boy for Jean Cardon Young’s father Con Peterson in the old O. P. Skaggs on Canyon Street. Skippy was lively, to say the least. And I knew Donnie Joe Heath.

There is always some old crone who goes about correcting things. So here I am. I have to mention that we called Donnie Joe’s mother “Bess,” and she wasn’t the postmistress. She worked at the post office for Alice Hanson who was the Postmaster. Alice always said “There are no ‘mistresses’ in MY post office.” That was her kind of humor.

And later, at West Yellowstone High School, Skippy’s daughter Lana was in our first or second graduating class. She had a pair of little brothers, one of whom was Crayton who shared First Grade with our son Romney and who, as they all had to, survived a harridan of a teacher. She may not have been the worst teacher I ever knew, but she was a close second. I think she disliked little boys, and that class had about ten of them. It was her vision that all plates should be empty after the lunch hour, especially devoid of the canned carrots, beans and peas, regular fare in those days. Crayton did not share her enthusiasm.

Each day after lunch, small desks of those who failed to eat their vegetables were put out into the hall where the culprits sat before their cold and miserable peas or carrots until they either ate the vegetables or had to be excused to go home. Crayton never gave up. One day as I was walking down the hall, there was Crayton, sitting stoically before his cold plate. “Crayton,” I said. “Whay don’t you just eat those peas and go back to class with your friends?” He looked at me with those beautiful big brown eyes, and said, “But I don’t like peas.”

Later I heard that Crayton Fenn was the youngest licensed plumbing contractor on record. No doubt he became interested in such a profession, having dumped so many cold peas down the drain.

Jan Dunbar

———————-

Crayton's grandfather Marvin and Crayton hanging out at Marvin's Airstream Trailer at the West Fork Campground between Ennis and West Yellowstone. Probably taken in the mid 80's.

Crayton’s grandfather Marvin and Crayton hanging out at Marvin’s Airstream Trailer at the West Fork Campground between Ennis and West Yellowstone. Probably taken in the mid 80’s.

 

CBS Sunday Morning….

JULY 2015
by dal…

 

SMBanner

In early June I went out to search around Yellowstone National Park with a CBS News crew from New York. They were creating a story on the treasure hunt for CBS Sunday Morning. When I met up with them they had already followed a family from Colorado who were searching and had also been down in Santa Fe and talked with Forrest…and I believe a few other folks in the area who know Forrest.

The Producer of the story, Dustin Stephens, contacted me about a month earlier and we decided on a date and location I would be searching where they would be able to meet up with me. What follows is a Behind The Scenes look at the shoot I experienced with the CBS News crew.

The location was to be near Fountain Flats in Yellowstone National Park. The date was to be June 5th.

wl06

A lovely warm creek on the edge of Fountain Flats in Yellowstone National Park

Getting permission to film professionally in YNP is typically a simple process…unless the Chief Ranger is Tim Reid and unless you are going there to film a “searcher”. So when Dustin filled out the necessary forms and sent them in, the whole “permission” process became convoluted. The administration didn’t really want to allow a story about searchers in their our park. They tried to prevent it but could’t quite pull it off.

To begin, Ranger Reid would not allow himself to be interviewed by CBS because apparently “treasure hunting” is beneath him. The administration would only allow the crew into the park to film me if the crew, and I, agreed to a number of restrictions. For instance, I was not allowed to carry any kind of “searching tool”. So I agreed to leave my ice axe in Esmerelda. The crew had to stay within a quarter mile of any road, which meant that I could not search beyond a quarter mile of any road. There were other rules too and many were unusual restrictions for a news crew. The most interesting was that we had to have a “guide” with us. The guide would be a ranger and the ranger would only be available for half a day so we had to get all filming inside the park accomplished during that time. Of course this meant that there would be someone official from the park with us if we were to actually find the chest. No sneaking it out of the park since the guide was watching us. It also meant we would not be able to postpone due to weather or equipment problems. We had a one half-day window and that was firm, not negotiable. I am pretty certain the administration used this requirement to absolutely limit the filming to something unreasonable in the hope that CBS would cave and film somewhere else. But CBS agreed to everything and we all met on June 5th at the appointed hour in the parking lot at Madison Junction to run off and start filming.

wl04

Near Fountain Flats

But the gods were not with us. The crew had been pulled off the Searcher story and were ready to pile into their vehicles and head for Billings to do a breaking news story on Dennis Hastert. So there we were, ranger guide, searcher guy, correspondent and news crew all ready to go but CBS News wanted the team to go do another story. Of course that meant they lost all opportunity to film in the park after their hard fought battle with the administration to do so. Hung by their own brand new rope.

So that gave me a day to think about where else we could film. Film crews are used to working hard to get all the footage and sounds they need to tell a story, but no one wants to scrabble up hill, over uneven terrain carrying cameras, tripods and microphones a great distance and I didn’t want to spend hours driving up some dusty service road before we could get out and hike to a good spot.

Wild strawberries

Wild strawberries

Bitterroot

Bitterroot

I checked my list of 17 possible locations to check out on this trip. These are all places the clues in the poem take me right up to the blaze. My sense is that I will have to find the blaze when I get to any spot and then, if found, move on from that point in the poem. Whit’s Lake seemed like a great possibility. Short drive, unlikely to be any other humans nearby, 20 minute hike from the vehicles and possibly picturesque. The clues to that area seemed strong. But since I had not been there I wondered if there was a blaze. Certainly we could film up there as long as we wanted.

wl08

Since Whit’s Lake is on Forest Service land I wanted to check in with the USFS about filming there. The Forest Service has regulations about professional filming on their our land as well as the Park Service. The folks at the Gallatin Nat’l Forest Ranger Station on the north side of West Yellowstone were very helpful and very gracious. They were curious about the treasure hunt because they had heard about it and were interested in more detail. I shared what I could before they got busy with phone calls and daily business. They were courteous and welcoming and even offered up a suggestion for a place I might want to look. A lot different than the Park Service. They never even mentioned the legal hassles if the chest were found on Forest Service land. “Go forth and search.” the district ranger told me.

Approaching Whit's Lake

Approaching Whit’s Lake

Whit's Lake

Whit’s Lake

We did. Dustin, Mike, Barry, Andre and I proceeded up to the lake the next day. We filmed an interview followed by my search of the area around the lake looking for a lovely blaze.

wl02

Mike and Dustin talk about the filming on the tree shrouded trail to the lake

wl012

Barry, Andre and Mike setting up for my interview as a string of dudes on pony’s ambles by.

I found a potential blaze in a solitary rock on the side of the lake and another potential blaze in a waterfall from  the feeder stream heading into the lake…Neither very strong blazes but I would be foolish to walk away without checking them out…

Once again I found no chest. But I had a great walk, the day was beautiful. The company was great. The wildflowers were lovely…

Harebells

Harebells

My search along with all the other elements of this CBS News story aired on July 12th…

You can watch the story HERE. Look around on that page and you should find some additional footage including a clip of Forrest reading his poem..

Check out their Facebook page and Twitter feed too..

https://www.facebook.com/CBSSunday

https://twitter.com/cbssunday

dal-

The New Little Cache….

JUNE 2015

 

September 2015:
NOTICE: THE CACHE IS PICKED UP FOR THE WINTER AND WILL BE RETURNED NEXT SPRING.

If You Find It Don’t Keep It…PLEASE!

I hid a new little cache…just for fun. It will give folks in the MT/WY area something to look for after a hard day of searching for Forrest’s Treasure Chest, particularly if you come up empty handed.

The idea is for you to go find the little cache. Take one thing out and then put something else inside. Preferably something associated with where you live or who you are or what you do…Sign the register and date it and say what you added and took..

Then, take a pic of you holding the cache and email it to me when you get near some wifi.

dal-at-lummifilm-dot-com

Make sure I have your screen name with the photo and I’ll post the pics on this page.

Then close it back up tight and put it back the way you found it so the next person who comes along can find t and enhance it..

It’s just a fun thing to do and won’t take long to find..have fun thinking about what you can put inside it. The item you put inside cannot be very big. The box is small…so a coffee mug won’t fit.

Here’s a pic of the cache when I finished putting things inside it.

The new cache. Some verified wood, obsidian, marbles, caribeaner, an old bead, some hand tied flies, an apache tear, a quartz crystal and a pyrite crystal..or and a miniature book... Take something and leave something from where you live..sign the book. Send me a picture of you and the chest and I'll post it.. But I'm having trouble finding a spot to hide it. The old spot was the best but the Park didn't like a cache in their park.

The new cache. Some petrified wood, obsidian, marbles, caribeaner, an old bead, some hand tied flies, an apache tear, a quartz crystal and a pyrite crystal..and a miniature book…
Take something and leave something from where you live..sign the book. Send me a picture of you and the chest and I’ll post it..

And now the directions. These are made so a kid can follow them.

Begin it in West Yellowstone on Boundary and Madison at this place.

IMG_9954

This is the motel that Forrest, Skippy and Donnie built.

From here look directly across Boundary and see this.

IMG_9953

The trail through the wood to the Madison River. But you won’t be going that far.

From this sign take 70 paces up the trail to here:

IMG_9947

This is a second signpost just up the trail 70 paces from the first signpost.

From here you take 140 paces and then halt.
Turn to your left and take 20 paces.
You should be looking at this. The cache is directly in front of you.

IMG_9941

Don’t be stumped you are looking at the cache.

It’s not buried. It’s hidden. And if you need a precise location..try this:

IMG_9902

The coordinates of the little cache.

Okay..go get it..have fun!!
Ohhhh…one more thing..please don’t put any food inside. The critters will get at it..
They can even smell food in that tub if it’s sealed.

I’VE BEEN THERE PHOTOS:
PAGE ONE

 

Goodbye Harry…

$_57

March 1st, 2014

by Chipper Smith-

Harry Mayo passed away yesterday…pancreatic cancer. God damn it! Years of being a hypochondriac finally paid off for you Harry.

IMG_2958

Harry Mayo

A passion for fly fishing brought Harry to West Yellowstone from Connecticut in the 70s. I could say that Harry was a best friend of mine for many years but realize many people could say exactly the same. That is the kind of person Harry was, a friend to many.

Harry had a great smile, a great sense of humor and great respect for wildlife, conservation, and people…pretty much in that order.

I spent many years bow hunting and fishing with Harry. Hobbies were a science and obsession with Harry. He taught me the intricacies of stalking trophy fish in clear shallow waters. Harry would explain how these guys were so smart and had to be stalked with care and that you could not cause the slightest vibration or cast a shadow on any part of the water. The cast had to be absolutely perfect so the line and fly lit ever so softly.

My passion for hunting waned and I was never able to land that fly quite soft enough. For no particular reason we spent less and less time together. Harry married his sweet wife Joanne and eventually moved to Arizona. We lost contact.

I didn’t hear from Harry for months and months then out of the blue He calls about 7 months ago. He was anxious to tell me a story of hidden treasure he had stumbled across while surfing the Internet. A gentleman from Santa Fe named Forrest Fenn had buried a chest worth millions and Harry knew just where it was.

Harry was excited to know that I had been searching for the treasure a few years ahead of him. I have suffered a few injuries that I credit Harry for – minor cuts, abrasions and a severely sprained wrist. Harry’s hunches seemed to always lead me to the very roughest terrain. I also saw some amazing country.

When a friend called and told me of Harry’s death this morning I realized that Harry helped me find Forrest Fenn’s treasure. The treasure was a renewed connection with an old friend. How grateful I am to have talked and emailed with Harry these last 7 months. Thank you Forrest and thank you Harry Mayo. Rest in peace and God bless Joanne.