The Tenth Clue…

clue

Submitted May 18, 2020
by Jason

 

As Forrest said, “The treasure is out there waiting for the person who can make all the lines cross in the right spot”.  As important as it is to find out how the 9 clues create a path to the treasure, I would argue that the 10th clue is that we know the chest hiding place is somewhere FF deems personal and special.  For example, if we were just given the poem without knowing who wrote it, then we would truly be required to search the entire Rockies for a potential location.

However, since we know the final location is special to Forrest, we can narrow that search down to locations that are special to him.  I would argue that the TOTC book, which is written as Fenn’s memoir, gives us the answer to what places are important to Forrest.  As Forrest says, “There comes a time (maybe it’s an age) when all of us reflect on the happenings that marked our passage through the brakes and thickets of life”  To me, TOTC is the book where Forrest reflects on his life.

The stories he decided to include in the book are where his mind went when deciding to tell the story of his life.

timeline

The timeline here indicates when each story Fenn mentions takes place.  Fenn seems to have been reminiscing a lot about his time before he was 20 and went into the Air Force.  I think the older we get, it is common to look back at the formative years of our lives, and what they meant to us.

I would suggest that the special place that contains the treasure was found during this formative period.  Further I would argue that the odds are good that Fenn discovered this location before the age of 13.  Fenn says in the book that even though he is nearly 80, “my mind stays at about thirteen”.   That would be 1943 on the timeline, when Forrest was a fishing guide in Yellowstone, and marble champion on school.

So in summary, given the stories of Fenn’s formative years, I would argue that Temple Texas and the West Yellowstone areas are very important to Fenn.  Since only West Yellowstone is in our search area, I think it is likely that the treasure can be found within a distance a 13 year old boy could explore on his own from West Yellowstone.

-Jason

 

 

 

 

 

THE Theory…by Milwaukee Searcher


March 2020

By Milwaukee Searcher

 

I have had many, many theories over the past 7 and 1/2 years… but this is my most comprehensive to date. I arm chaired this theory, after many BOTG searches in NM…  for a year I studied this area, researched all i could, and drove all the way out to yellowstone- I was only able to search for 30 minutes… but that’s a whole ‘nother story… that trip will be 4 years ago this June… The more I look at this poem, the more confused I get… endless options… how to look at it, how to read it… but I’ve never been able to shake this theory-
I consider myself an architectural theorist, and have been to several spots in New Mexico, but only this location in Yellowstone.

this theory has “the” as “a word that is key”

(a key is something that turns to be unlocked)
“THE thrill of THE chase”
“some people over complicate THE complexity of THE search”
– “marry the poem to a map”
  “the poem is a map”
“imagination is greater than knowledge”   (this theory is imaginative).
poem as a map

Click on image to enlarge

close Joffe

entrance

1. “alone in there” = into Yellowstone, via 89 (the northern entrance/arch)   aloNE IN THEre= NE IN THE= (turn key)- Eht ni en= 89

 

2.  begin it where: warm… take it (warm) in the cAnyon, not far- but also fAr- put in below (below means, by definition “at a later place, or after)- so, put in below- put in after.
            warM waters halt = Mammoth
                cAnyon down
           too fAr to walk
     THE HOMe of brown
 (MAAMOH-EHT)
(turn key- the- eth- maamohthe=mammoth)
3.  from there it’s no place for “the”
From THEre it’s no place for the …
        THE end is…
     THEre’ll be no paddle…
        JusT HEavy loads
the home of Brown is created by #3-  an F forming (effort/F fort), representing some still standing buildings of the CCC (the old Glen Creek CCC, now the YCC)
    CCC boys were known as the “khaki kids”- khaki=brown.  more on CCC later- but keep in mind    mY SECret=ycc, quest to cease, all to see(k)
   ***in this theory, “the end” is referring to the cold, the wood, the gold
              I’ll get to this later
4. There’ll be-  aLL and listen good
                      wiLL BE worth…
           (trail to the end at southern end of lake?- this does seem to exist looking at google maps)

 

5. paddle up your creek-   I guess I took the liberty of paddling up the creek from “go”- resembling the shape of the actual Glen Creek- Go, marveL, quEst, fouNd, CREEK.  – but no “the” as a word that is key, and this might just be coincidence
6. if you’ve been wise and found the blaze- “the” blaze? the F?  look quickly down… to cease… the 3 c’s in quiCkly, sCant, and Chest- a path from the old CCC to the lake- this does exist, I believe.

 

7. I guess I also took the liberty of drawing Joffe Lake- following the sounds of the word- Just, Already,All, EFFort (EFFort), thE (pronounced “thee” answers), and lEave.         hey, Imagination is key, right? Sort of resembles the odd shape of the lake- and whY Chest sCant= YCC (look quickly down your quest to cease- two C’s) (see picture above)
8. “take the chest” to “leave my trove”-  the from    The chesT
                                                                                wHy is it tHat
                                                                            leavE my trovE
            – you can look at my notes here, on my drawn map… possible treasure at either at I (circled)- eastern point of lake, there was a tree there, and an open old stone gate i think leading to Glen Creek trail, or at southeastern part of lake- a small trail heading east to #9- see below.

 

9.  THE cold= loc eht=locate
           THE wood= w eht=weight
           THE gold= old geht= old gate?  =log eht= log 8?
                   – locate weight = 42 pounds…   something ff has been very specific about since the beginning.
   “the end is ever drawing nigh-  draw left-

 

so- yeah, there are definitely holes in this theory- but I went here- this was the place parents took their kids to learn how to fish in the 1940’s. It is not a tourist spot- you’d never know it was there, unless you just knew it was… It’s a very small lake.

 

other things to think about-

 

  • The clues did not exist when I was a kid but of most of the places the clues refer to did. I think they might still exist in 100 years.

-Joffe Lake used to be CCC Lake, and the YCC did not exist-(it was the        CCC)- so here are examples of places not existing when ff was a kid, but   the places the clues refer to did exist-

 

-here is a map from 1942 proving there was a CCC where the F (fort), or my home of Brown, existed.  1942 Glen Creek CCC

 

-on p.146 in TTOTC is the infamous drawing of a man with an axe, and all the cut down trees…  the CCC was also known as the “tree army,” and there are bronze sculptures all over the US of men with axes- CCC bronzes (Even if my theory is totally far off, these bronze statues must be significant?)

 

-the CCC slogan was “We can take it.”
(And take it in the canyon down…)

 

-there was a man- an author- by the name of Datus C Proper who also grew up in Yellowstone. He was 4 years younger than ff. He died as Skippy did, in a scuba diving accident. It was only in researching my Joffe Lake area that I came across this man… one of his books was What the Trout Said I have not read it- however, he was an avid fisherman, so growing up in Yellowstone, he probably knew at least some of the spots ff did. (I did reach out and ask ff if he knew Datus Proper- he did not reply). I mention him for 3 more reasons- (besides growing up in Yellowstone, being about ff’s age, his name itself, and his death).

 

    1. I found this article- “Managing Eden”- Field and Stream (By Datus C Proper, 1993)—    It’s very important you start on P.57, then continue to P.94-   by the end of the 2nd paragraph on p. 94, you can see why finding this AFTER I had my spot… I got excited…   youth, bikes, secret fishing… he even mentions “high water” in the third paragraph.

 

    2. the quote-  there are a couple of good hints and there are a couple of aberrations that live out on the edge.” (Moby Dickens Book Shop 34:41 mark) is it possible this is why a bunch of dates are wrong/obviously changed in the postmark stamps? say his name- Datus Proper-  sounds like Date us proper-   is this like ff?

 

   3.”What is wrong with me just riding my bike out there and throwing it in the water high when I am through with it?” (HOD Forrest Gets Mail 10/03/2012
-the little girl in India could not get further than the first 2 clues with the poem and a map of the Rockies, because a map of the Rockies only has highway 89 and Mammoth Hot Springs… the rest is more detailed. 
 
“Your destination is small but it’s location is huge”- yellowstone is huge? Joffe Lake area small in comparison?
————————–

 

without me drawing on joffe lake and glen creek, and YCC(C) and my notes- just look at the “the’s”- here is a picture of that… this could be something?    please note, “the” blaze resembles an F, and “the” end resembles an upside down F…    and i don’t think it’s an accident that “the chest” goes to “my trove”…

 

22the22

 

 

 

 

The Fox and Hounds…

March 2020
by Muset

 

Here is an exercise for anybody who wants to play with anagrams.  The original poem line is “begin it where warm waters halt.”  Try and find an anagram for that line, given the context of the following story.  Don’t worry about punctuation.  If you get it correct, I think you may also learn the key word.

Back in 2018 I took vacation to London to see some of the many museums that I hadn’t yet visited.  One of those places was the Imperial War Museum and they had a special area reserved for displaying the medals and short biographies of many of the Victoria Cross medal recipients.

Philip Neame was born 12 December, 1888 in southeast England when Jack the Ripper was terrorizing east London .

Neame joined the Royal Engineers in 1908 and found himself in the French trenches during WWI.  He set about improvising hand grenades from jam jars, scrap metal and gun cotton.  

He received the Victoria Cross, among other honours, for single-handedly fending off a German counter-attack with field-improvised grenades in 1914.  

He won an Olympic gold medal in 1924 for a sharp-shooting-on-the-move event called the Running Deer.  The Olympic medal was not in the display cabinet but there were seventeen other medals in addition to the Victoria Cross packed in there.

In February of 1940, Philip was posted to Egypt and Trans-Jordan as a high-ranking division commander.  The Suez Canal was a very strategic British asset, being the main trade route to its imperial possession India.  The Red Sea is tropical but the Mediterranean is several degrees colder.

suez egypt

There are military bases are along the canal.

Things were going well for the Allies in North Africa until Marshal Erwin Rommel, the “Desert Fox,” arrived at Tripoli, Libya, in February of 1941 with two tank divisions.

Unfortunately for Philip, he was one of three generals among thousands of his men in the armoured division and Australian division all captured in Libya by Rommel’s Deutsches Afrika Korps (DAK) in April, 1941.  The actual German commander who captured them was Gerhard von Schwerin.  The other two captured generals were John Combe and Richard O’Connor.

Max 12

https://www.o5m6.de/wehrmacht/max.php

The three captured British generals were each in their several armoured command vehicle, the AEC (Associated Equipment Company) “Dorchester,” nicknamed after the famous Dorchester Hotel in London because they were so capacious and comfortable.  Marshal Rommel liked those vehicles so much he used them for himself and his own staff.  The Germans renamed those armoured beasts DAK “Mammoth”.  The fox was dressed like the hound.

image

A Dorchester/Mammoth over-painted with the German cross.

 Incarcerated in Italy near Florence, the British generals spent seven months constructing an escape tunnel along with their new prison friends Brigadiers James Hargest and Reginald Miles of New Zealand, and Sir Adrian Carton de Wiart, who also had a Victoria Cross medal from action in 1916 France.

The two New Zealanders made it safely to Switzerland, but the four Britons were all recaptured within a fortnight and reunited in their prison at Castello di Vincigliata near Florence with a month-long solitary penalty.

800px Castello di vincigliata2C torre 2

Castello di Vincigliata– Gaoler to the rich and famous.

Erwin Rommel’s final North African offensive had failed only a few weeks earlier in March, 1943, even with the addition of new Tiger tanks of the 501 Panzer Division joining in November, 1942.  Rommel was reassigned to Greece and then France.

Incredibly in August, 1943, Sir Adrian Carton de Wiart was escorted from prison to Rome on the orders of the Italian King and Prime Minister to be the messenger to Britain concerning Italy’s desire for an armistice with the Allies. 

The September 3, 1943 Italian Armistice lead to Neame’s release into the Nazi-held countryside with companions Combe, O’Connor and Marshal Owen Boyd.  They made their way just over a hundred miles to the coast near Rimini.  Combe joined the local Libero partisans while the rest hired a boat making it to Allied-occupied territory at Termoli in December, 1943.  

Combe made it back to Britain in May, 1944.  That same month Erwin Rommel joined the resistance against Hitler, which failed in July and sealed his fate.  He accepted the offer of suicide to spare his family.

Sadly, Marshal Boyd died from a heart attack in August, 1944, at least at home in London.

Gerhard von Schwerin went on to survive Stalingrad with great honours and then Aachen with heroism by trying to spare the civilians and architecture of that immensely important historic town.  He was later captured in Italy by the British forces in April, 1945 and released two years later after the war.

Philip Neame was appointed Lieutenant Governor of Guernsey in August 1945 and knighted in 1946, among many other honours.

Nobody knows what happened to the three DAK Mammoths but they were probably abandoned somewhere out in the Sahara Desert, broke down and no fuel.

-by Muset

 

 

 

 

The Poem as Riddle…

rid

December 2019
by dal

BrainDen.com (http://brainden.com/logic-riddles.htm) states that a riddle is simply a statement which has a secret meaning.

They give as an example the following old favorite:

Brothers and sisters I have none but this man’s father is my father’s son.
Who is the man?

The answer of course is “the man is my son”.

But my favorite riddle from BrainDen could be a model for solving the puzzle of Forrest’s poem:

What is greater than God,
more evil than the devil,
the poor have it,
the rich need it,
and if you eat it, you’ll die?

The answer “nothing”.

At first unveiling the answer “nothing” sounds like a cheat…but it is not…and is best understood by turning each line of the riddle into a question, such as:

What is greater than God…nothing.
What is more evil than the devil…nothing.
What do the poor have…nothing.
What do the rich need…nothing.
What happens if you eat nothing…you die.

This I believe is the kind of riddle that could be contained in Forrest’s poem…

But wait!…there’s more…

Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riddle#In_real_life) is much more extensive and tells us that a riddle is:

…a statement or question or phrase having a double or veiled meaning, put forth as a puzzle to be solved. 

Wiki goes on to say:
…riddles have in the past few decades ceased to be part of oral tradition, being replaced by other oral-literary forms…

And then Wiki provides many very concise examples of riddles from various parts of the peopled world, from the Old Testament to Batman. All very fascinating, in my opinion and certainly furthers my interest in looking at Forrest’s poem as a riddle…

Wiki points out that there are two basic types of riddles…Enigmas and Cunundrums. Forrest’s riddle type would most definitely be an enigma.
Enigmas are problems expressed in allegorical language, requiring careful thinking and ingenuity to solve.

If I take the combined definitions from Wiki and BrainDen for “riddle”…I come up with:
A statement having a secret or hidden meaning put forth as a puzzle to be solved.

That certainly seems to sum up our poem. Further, knowing Forrest’s interest in words, word games, history and humor…the literary riddle seems to be right up his alley…

Nothing in any definition of a riddle that I have come across suggests a riddle is any kind of cipher or code.

Riddles have been part of literature for a very long time…

Ancient Sumerians lay claim to this one reputed to be over 4,000 years old:
What house do you enter blind but come out seeing?

Answer: A schoolhouse

In Alice in Wonderland the Mad Hatter asks Alice, how is a Raven like a writing desk?…
J. R. R. Tolkien planted riddles in The Hobbit.
Edgar Allen Poe wrapped riddles into a few of his works.
In Oedipus Rex the monster requires the answer to a riddle before the sojourner can continue.
Plato and Einstein played with riddles…Even Harry Potter contains riddles.

And riddles in poetry go nearly as far back as poetry itself. But there are plenty of modern examples as well. Emily Dickinson loved to riddle in her poems. Her poems were numbered. This is #466.

I dwell in Possibility –
A fairer House than Prose –
More numerous of Windows –
Superior – for Doors –

Of Chambers as the Cedars –
Impregnable of eye –
And for an everlasting Roof
The Gambrels of the Sky –

Of Visitors – the fairest –
For Occupation – This –
The spreading wide my narrow Hands
To gather Paradise –

Emily is describing poetry itself…fairer than prose…a kind of house she can live in.

I know what you’re thinking…so what’s the answer Dal? How did this help you solve the poem?
It hasn’t…but I’ve just started in on this approach.
Here’s how I think I might be able to use it…

Folks have suggested many times over the years that perhaps the clues all refer to the same place…
That could certainly be true in a literary riddle…as in the “nothing” riddle above where one word answers all the questions.

The word that is key which Forrest has referred to could be the answer to all the clues…again, as in the “nothing” riddle above.

It certainly gives me a new license to interpret “Brown”.

Forrest has said over and over that the puzzle of the poem is difficult but not impossible to figure out, and that is certainly what a riddle is…

Begin it in the corner but travel round the world.

 

 

 

Sparrow’s Speculations Part Three…

words

December 2019
by Sparrow

 

It has been quite a while since I posted my last article on Dal’s Blog (Sparrow’s Speculations 2).  

See Part 2 here if you are interested.

I mentioned in that article how I would share a “solve” in the future that I had put together a very long time ago when I first started the Chase. In fact, this solve was put together about two weeks after I first heard about the treasure hunt at the very end of July 2016.

One morning I came out to the computer and a large note was taped to it. It contained a poem and then instructions—many of which appear below. Here is the poem:

“I am the helpful ghost of Billy Barty

I have come to help you find the treasure.

I will not do this all alone,

But with the help of M.C. Escher”.

The ghost of Billy Barty was very insistent that the treasure was hidden in Wyoming. So much so that if I considered other states I would feel a kicking to my shins which was quite painful. Through time I began to realize that even a ghost can be wrong. I never did get to converse with Mr. Escher though he did promise one day to teach me how to make ends meet.  But this is the “solve” I put together back then:

As I studied the Poem, I noticed immediately the acrostic HORN (“Hint Of Riches New and Old”) on the fourth line of the poem.  Not too long after this, I also discovered another acrostic, “HORN”, which was on the 20th letter from the left and down.  The two “Horns” met and formed an “L” shape towards the left.

As I have gone alone in  tHere

And with my treasures  bOld

I can keep my secret wheRe

And Hint Of Riches New aNd old 

–note the “horn” downward on the 20th line, and the “Horn” from left to right on the fourth line of the poem.

I noticed also at that time that the Wind River and the Big Horn River in Wyoming are actually one continuous river with a “wedding of the waters” in the middle.  This continuous river forms an L shape towards the left when viewed from above on Google.

Click Here to See Map

Then I noticed that the sentence “Begin it where warm waters halt” had (26) letters in it.   This sentence was the first sentence just UNDER the first stanza.  The sentence has (26) letters and is right under the acrostic “HORN” in the 4th sentence.  The other “HORN” on the (20th) letter from left downward meets this sentence.  You then have a sentence with 26 letters just below an acrostic, which then connects with another acrostic on the 20th line.  I noticed that the Big Horn and Wind Rivers follow highway 20 south to highway 26 across towards the West:                                                                   20

BEGIN IT WHERE WARM WATERS HALT (26 LETTERS)     V        HWY 20 SOUTH CONNECTS WITH 26 WEST.

Click Here to See Map.

This was just too much of a coincidence for me. I immediately thought the treasure was in Wyoming.  Here was my understanding of the poem (at that time) after this discovery:

Begin it where warm waters halt”—-the amount of letters point to highway 26—and thus to THERMOPOLIS which is an ideal location for warm waters to halt. I had noticed while googling Thermopolis that the population was 3,009 people in 2010.  Forrest had spoken of the Chest lasting into the future, and had used the year 3009.  Again, I found this to be an amazing coincidence, as Forrest very likely had hidden the treasure in 2010.

And take it in the Canyon Down”—-follow highway 20 down to highway 26 junction.

Not far, but too far to walk”—a short drive.

Put in below the home of Brown”.   Fort Brown was once Fort Washakie. Highway 26 travels through this area. Perhaps “putting in” at Landers was a good idea since the Crow Reservation is located just northwest of there.

As you go west, you head into the Crow Reservation.  From there it’s no place for the meek”.  Of course, only “braves” would be in a Reservation, not the “meek”.

The End is ever drawing nigh”.  I never did completely figure it out, but I thought this might be an anagram of “Wind River Range” or something akin to that, as that Range draws closer and closer as you drive west.  It is continually nearing in the west as you drive towards it.

There’ll be no paddle up your creek”.  When you drive west on Highway 26 you eventually meet a small road, which heads “UP” or “North”.  It is East Fork Road:

Click Here to See Map

AnD leave my trove for all to seek

The Answer I already know

I’ve d One it tired and now I’m weak

So hea R me all and listen good

Your ef Fort will be worth the cold

If you ar E brave and in the wood   –note the progressive acrostic that spells “EF ROAD”.

You will not need a paddle here on East Fork Road—-you have to drive. 

Just Heavy Loads and Water High”—It may have been an old logging road so that would explain the “heavy loads”—and of course the “water high” is the Wind River.

If you’ve been wise and found the Blaze  Please notice that East Ford Road heads into (2) Y’s as it travels along. Could this be why Forrest mentions Yazzie Yarnell?

Click Here to See Map

Also, note that a lightning shaped feature of topography is located right at this area—-could this be “The Blaze”?

Click Here to See Map

“Look quickly down your quest to cease”

If we look quickly south from this “Blaze” we find a large “B” in the road.  Is the Treasure buried very close to this?  It’s also important to note that right where this lightning shaped blaze it there is a draw called “Harvey Draw”. Remember that Forrest actually won the bracelet from someone named “Harvey”. I would also point out that the name Harvey means “blazing”.

Click Here to See Map

Here is the area directly south of the “Blaze”—- there is a “B” in the road.

Click Here to See Map

But tarry scant with marvel gaze

Do not stay in the area very long. This road could have cross traffic, and people could be in the area.

Just take the chest and go in peace

South of “Harvey Draw” is another draw called “Pease Draw”—after we locate the chest should we exist in “Pease”?

So why is it that I should go” –so “Y” is where we should be headed. Note that “Wiggins Fork” forms a “Y”—and just north of this by the way is Gerry Spence’s Law School.  Another important consideration.

“And leave my trove for all to seek

The answers I already know

I’ve done it tired and now I’m weak”

References that the Treasure was not far from the car Forrest was driving.  He is old now and “weak” so he did not travel far when hiding the treasure.

So hear me all and listen good

Your effort will be worth the cold

This far north in Wyoming and at this altitude it is cold.  But it will be worth the effort to make the journey.

“If you are brave and in the wood

Please note that I believe where the treasure is hid is RIGHT on the border of the Crow Reservation, and the outskirts of DUBOIS, which, in French, means “the wood”.  You will thus be BOTH Brave and “in the wood” at the same time if you are on a border.

Though I did not have the exact coordinates, I believed the treasure to be just opposite of the letter B in the group of trees across the Wind River just to the West.  And of course by finding the treasure the last line of the poem applies “I give you title to the Gold”.

I do want to mention that I share this “solve” because I thought it was a good one at the time. I no longer believe that the Treasure is hidden in this location. But it does show the amount of coincidence that can lead to a “solve”. So many factors can “seem” to fall into place that we really begin to believe we have solved it. I certainly did at the time.

-Sparrow

 

 

 

 

 

A Slippy Slidey Blazey Crazy Armchair Solve…

gardiner

October 2019
by JonPaul

I stumbled upon the poem from The Thrill of The Chase, and all-things-Forrest-Fenn, when the British press covered the story a couple of years ago.  I’ve always been fond of puzzles and riddles so naturally I found Forrest’s poem irresistible.  I have very much enjoyed my introduction to Yellowstone, to Wyoming and Montana, and to the colorful history of this unique, beautiful corner of the US.  Like many others I have studied the poem and formulated a solution.  And, like many others, it is not feasible for me to travel to Yellowstone to conduct a boots-on-the-ground exploration, so a walkthrough of my rationale will have to suffice, and hopefully it will be of use.  Should anyone use this solution and actually find the treasure, I trust they will give credit where credit is due.

I’ll be honest: I have not read TTOTC.  However, from reading the many blogs and resources online, I think the wider context of the hunt – and perhaps the most salient clue to be taken from the book – is that Forrest has a long and intimate knowledge of Yellowstone, especially the Western reaches, and the creeks and waterways therein that might be discovered by the avid and adventurous fly fisherperson.  I have also learned the following from various additional statements that Forrest has made:

I believe the 1st stanza basically sets the scene – Forrest’s secret place is somewhere he was able to visit openly, alone, in his 80’s, carrying 40lbs over 2 trips in a single afternoon (https://www.fftreasure.com/uncategorized/not-under-water-done-two-trips/).  The 2nd Stanza is where the real clues begin – let’s get to it!

‘Where warm waters halt’ is, I believe, where the Gardner River flows into the Yellowstone River at Gardiner.  There are a great many potential WWWH’s in and around Yellowstone, but Forrest does not capitalize ‘warm’ here which suggests it’s not Warm Spring Meadow, Warm Springs Creek, or similar (and we’ll come back to Forrest’s use of capitalization later).  There are too many hot springs scattered throughout Yellowstone for Forrest to be unnecessarily vague, so I believe he must be – surreptitiously – offering us something we can work with.  I believe that ‘warm’ is the key word here.  It’s a strange and specific term for Forrest to use: not cool, tepid or hot, not scalding or boiling, just ‘warm’.  We can guess from Forrest’s accounts of childhood that our WWWH could be, or could be linked to, a hot spring he used to know as a boy.  It turns out that in the 1800’s the Gardner River was known as Warm Spring Creek due to the hot springs at Boiling River (Historical Origin of Waterways Names in Yellowstone).  Forrest is, I believe, using the word ‘warm’ to specify this particular waterway, and the WWWH it points to, without being either too vague or too obvious.  Where does the Gardner River halt?  It halts where it meets and mixes with the cold water of the Yellowstone River.  The interesting thing is that if you’ve adopted Boiling River (a hot spring) as your WWWH, instead of the Gardner River, it doesn’t really matter – following the next 2 clues takes you ultimately to the same checkpoint.

‘Take it in the canyon down’ means, I believe, follow the Yellowstone River downriver (rather than following the Gardner Canyon south).  The Yellowstone River is not specifically named as a canyon at Gardiner, but I think it can apply in general terms and subsequent clues make a lot more sense with respect to the Yellowstone River.

‘The home of Brown’ is, I believe, the home of ‘Uncle’ Joe Brown – Joe Brown Creek.  This appears to be confirmed by ‘Put in’ which, at face value, is a straight reference to the boat ramp located here.  There are a great many potential HOBs (HsOB?) if we only consider brown the colour, but here we see an overt capitalization.  I don’t feel that Forrest, as a wordsmith, would want to sow unnecessary confusion by deliberately misusing standard grammar.  If it’s capitalised, I believe Forrest is signifying a person’s name, pure and simple.  Forrest did have names for all the local fish, but it appears that they were on first-name terms (https://dalneitzel.com/2018/05/04/not_in_yellowstone/).  And since WWWH is Gardiner in this solution, it’s not feasible for the correct Brown to be Ranger Brown or Grafton Tyler Brown.

‘No place for the meek’ is, I believe, Slip & Slide Creek, the mouth of which is located below (South) of the mouth of Joe Brown Creek.  Its name speaks for itself.  Now, I admit I was *sorely* tempted at this juncture to err towards Tom Miner Creek / Rock Creek, and an area that appears to satisfy the subsequent clues to a greater or lesser extent, but I think Forrest’s lack of capitalization for ‘meek’ precludes this interpretation.  Extending the logic from the previous clue, I think Forrest would have used ‘Meek’ if he wanted us to head to Tom Miner Basin per the legend of Joseph Meek.  Instead my solution continues on the north side of the river, south of Joe Brown Creek. . .‘The end is ever drawing nigh’ refers, I believe, to Sliding Mountain West, located just beyond the end (source) of Slip & Slide Creek.  I’ve read a lot of speculation about whether ‘nigh’ means left, and I believe it could, but there’s actually a bigger clue here.  We know that Forrest plays golf, and once dreamed of being a professional golfer (https://mysteriouswritings.com/six-questions-with-forrest-fenn-and-the-thrill-of-the-chase-treasure-hunt-double-charmed/).  He knows that the controlled versions of a Hook shot (which drifts left) and a Slice shot (which veers right) are called Draw and Fade.  This clue tells us, I believe, that the end of the correct creek is a location that is ever drifting left or, to use different language, sliding west.  In a wordplay triple-whammy, we also know that a ‘draw’ is the name given to a small stream flowing in a steep channel, and also means to bring forth water (eg; drawing a bath), both of which suggest that we’re following a real water-bearing creek and not a road or forest trail. . .

‘There’ll be no paddle up your creek’ is not just a play on the well-known saying ‘Up (the) creek without a paddle’.  It reiterates, I believe, something hinted at in the previous clues – we should be definitely following an actual waterway.  There are many creeks in Yellowstone that have a similarly-named creek road running alongside, but I think Forrest knows we’ll need to be ‘in there’ by now – on foot, and getting our walking boots muddy.  I believe that ‘no paddle’ simply refers to walking, but perhaps also implies that the correct creek is dry in part.

‘Heavy loads and water high’ is yet another clue that could point to several notable locations in this part of Yellowstone.  Heavy loads could refer to rocks, electricity, or the old railroad.  ‘Water high’ could refer to elevated creeks or lakes, or be an allusion to Hell.  From point-of-view of where we are in the poem and on the map (ascending Slip & Slide Creek) I believe this clue serves to frame and underline where we are and where we’re headed – towards the source of the creek.  I believe that ‘Heavy loads’ refers to Big Pine Creek over the ridge to the north, and ‘water high’ refers to the cluster of lakes near High Mountain to the south.  I believe we’re being guided in, like a plane coming to land – the poem lays out where we’re coming from, where we’re heading, and what stands either side as way markers.  I also believe, however, that we’re not meant to go right to end of the creek. . .

‘If you’ve been wise and found the blaze’ is, to my mind, the most difficult clue in the whole poem.  As Forrest has noted, a ‘blaze’ could be just about anything  (https://www.chasechat.com/archive/index.php?thread-5596.html).  Of course, it could just be a simple mark on a tree, as is traditional, but I suspect that’s too mundane for a wordsmith like Forrest.  I believed for a long time that the blaze was a shape to be traced on a map by following the locations described by the clues, and that the final shape (maybe an ‘X’ or an arrow) would point to the actual location of the chest.  I could never get this approach to work, however, because the clues and locations are sequential, not scattergun.  Forrest has hinted that we should ‘make all the lines cross in the right spot’ (https://www.reddit.com/r/FindingFennsGold/comments/amuhe4/anyone_drawing_lines_on_a_map/), but I believe this can be taken to mean that it’s simply a case of intersecting the lines he’s describing in the right places: the line from Gardiner to the Joe Brown Put-In; the subsequent line from the mouth of Slip & Slide Creek up towards Sliding Mountain West.  In this sense, I believe he really means ‘spots’, plural.  This would suggest that the crossing lines aren’t an ‘X’ marking the spot, but simply where one section of the path joins up with the next.

So, what IS the blaze?  Forrest hinted early on that identifying the blaze is meaningless without having already solved the preceding clues (https://dalneitzel.com/cheat-sheet/).  This is an important clue.  If someone was out hiking and stumbled randomly upon an incongruous sign, they might be tempted to root around underneath and subsequently find the treasure.  But Forrest doesn’t want that – it would render the preceding clues redundant – and he’s discounted the chance of anyone finding the treasure by accident (https://dalneitzel.com/cheat-sheet/).  Consequently I believe that the blaze can’t simply be a sign out in the wilderness.  Instead, I think the blaze shows us when to look, as we move up the correct creek.  And how do we identify the blaze?  Forrest tells us, I believe.  He says we will already have been wise (past tense) and found it.  Wise, of course, means clever.  But we wouldn’t be in the correct creek already if we weren’t clever.  The word ‘-wise’ (like the similar ‘-wards’) also means to move in a direction, usually with respect to a circle: clockwise or anti-clockwise.  I believe Forrest is instructing us to turn.  But which way?  I don’t think it matters.  Forrest just wants us to turn around, which will enable us to find the blaze.  At this point I believe the blaze can only be a reference to the name of Shooting Star Mountain, which at 9665 feet would be visible in the southwest once you’ve reached the correct elevation up Slip & Slide Creek.

‘Look quickly down, your quest to cease’ tells us, I believe, that the chest is on, or set into, the ground at that spot – a point up Slip & Slide Creek where the peak of Shooting Star Mountain first comes into view behind you.  It’s not an exact science, which is why I believe Forrest has always maintained that a boots-on-the-ground search is necessary for the treasure to be found (https://www.reddit.com/r/FindingFennsGold/comments/bh9qsp/thinking_out_loud/).  The clues in the poem will put you to within a few meters of the treasure, but it’s up to you to scour the ground at your feet to find the chest itself.  The middle reaches of Slip & Slide Creek are no more than 3km from Route 89, which makes them accessible on foot from a vehicle parked near the Yankee Jim Picnic Area below.  A round trip would take about 2 hours, which would have allowed ample time for Forrest to make the journey twice in one afternoon.

Additional: Forrest has given a few cryptic quotes about the end of the search being somehow connected to the beginning, including a reference to a poem by TS Eliot (“moved with confidence” – The Hint of Riches – Forrest Fenn’s Treasure Hunt).  I believe that this is a nod to the other link between Shooting Star Mountain and Slip & Slide Creek:  as far as I can tell, before a recent land exchange (https://billingsgazette.com/outdoors/land-exchange-opens-gardiner-basin-ranch-to-public/article_929ae536-bec4-58d3-983f-f9d9ed1f24db.html) the lower slope of Slip & Slide Creek was owned by the Shooting Star Ranch, which is located in the Cinnabar Basin between Shooting Star Mountain and the river.  In short, the right spot up Slip & Slide Creek is denoted by visibility of the mountain which lends its name to the ranch which recently owned the lower stretch of that same creek.  Full circle.  Not to mention that half of western Yellowstone would be visible from the higher portions of Slip & Slide Creek, giving searchers a fresh perspective on the road already travelled.

I can’t help but feel that the last 2 stanzas are essentially an extended outro, with ‘brave’, ‘in the wood’, and ‘cold’ underlining the need for searchers to go out in the field.  ‘So hear me all and listed good’ could be a reference to the natural amphitheater formed by the curved ridge that surrounds Slip & Slide Creek (incorporating the peaks of Red Mountain, Sliding Mountain West, and High Mountain) but that feels a little too tenuous to me.  It’s more likely, I believe, that this is a nod to the famous letter written by Native American leader Chief Joseph (http://fennclues.com/hear-me-all-and-listen-good.html), along with ‘I’ve done it tired, and now I’m weak’.  Forrest planned his hunt and wrote the poem when, like the Chief, he believed his days were truly numbered.

Well, there it is.  I can’t shake the conviction that my solution gets at least a few clues correct, but then I guess most people who have worked out a solution feel the same way.  If not, then it’s been both fun and informative, for which I thank Forrest most sincerely.  Best wishes!

JonPaul, UK

 

 

 

 

Sparrow’s Speculations Part 2…

words

August 2019
by Sparrow                                                                                                      

It was interesting to see the reactions to my first article, Sparrow’s Speculations #1. The first article mainly revolved around one sentence that Forrest had shared on his birthday, 8-22-2016. If you read that article you would know that I shared that I thought it was very possible Forrest was revealing the Car Rental agency he used (for part or all of the journey) when hiding the Treasure. 

The reactions ranged from acceptance that it was “more than a coincidence” to downright mockery of the whole idea. I expected this. As I had mentioned, these are “speculations” about several oddities I have encountered as I did my investigations into the poem itself, and many “hints” I feel that Forrest has given us over the years. Though not unique, my method of solving the poem is very different from the method the majority of searchers use. I know this because I follow the blogs, and read the “solves”, and rarely see anyone approach the poem the way I do.

I must admit that I am very reluctant to share what I am about to share, as this has taken considerable time and thought. In some ways (this sounds quite egotistical I admit) I feel this will blow the lid off the way people are searching, and will eventually lead to an intelligent person solving this awesome puzzle.

What I am about to share in a couple of short articles are “examples” of acrostics I have found in the poem. The first “example” is merely “speculation”, and displays a couple of oddities I have encountered searching, with the final offering being something that I believe will be extremely difficult to deny, or to chalk up to “coincidence” or CONFIRMATION BIAS.  

THE AMAZING FORREST FENN

I must confess that after investigating what I am about to show you, and seeing what Forrest has done, I am completely amazed. When Forrest said that the poem took him 15 years to complete, I can understand why. I know this was not labor that took 365 days a year for 15 years to complete when he says this, but it was still a tremendous amount of work. A lot of trial and error, and imagination were involved in completing it. It is actually quite astounding, and I feel I have really only scratched the surface of what is actually hidden in this poem.

Constructing even a small poem with a few verses in acrostic form is difficult. Imagine constructing the poem of 24 lines, which has acrostics hidden on several lines, horizontal and vertical, and even diagonally throughout the whole poem? This is an amazing feat! It boggles the mind in some instances, when realizing ALL of the words communicated to us by doing this.  Here is the first example. Again, this first example does not include ALL the words that I have found, as the final example I give within the next couple of articles will be almost impossible to refute. This first example contains “speculation” as it is possible that it is “coincidence”. I will leave you to be the judge of that.

sppoem

 This example is using the poem in the form given (all stanzas in place).  I have tried to make a variation in size for the letters in this example. In future examples I may use different colors for the various words used.  The very first acrostics I saw when reading the poem were GAIT (Gone Alone In There), WAFT (Wise And Found The) and BAIT (Brave And In The). In other articles I have written, I have shown how Forrest has “hinted” at these same words SEVERAL times. They are basic acrostics. They could very well be random. However, the hints Forrest has shared lead me to believe these are very REAL. These acrostics are in the first line, the 13th line, and 23rd line horizontally.  These are the BACKBONE of the poem in my opinion. 

The second set of acrostics I saw when investigating is the word HORN.  There are (2) obvious examples of HORN in the poem.  The first is on the beginning letters in the 4th line: “Hint Of Riches New” (HORN). This acrostic connected with another acrostic on exactly the 20th line vertically downward: HORN.  For me this is no coincidence. I will explain in detail why HORN (on line #4 horizontally) meeting “horn” (on exactly the 20th line vertically) is very important to the solution in a future article.

Please also note the diagonal acrostic “EDEN” which starts at the last letter of line #1 and heads vertically down to meet the “N” in the vertical acrostic “horn”. I believe EDEN may be an important part to the solution also. That is why I am including that acrostic in this first example.  Again, I will explain in detail why this is so in a future article.

I have also included three other DIAGONAL acrostics found in the poem:  to hasten” (begins on the 8th line diagonally upwards to end on 1st line), “birth” (backwards acrostic downwards beginning on 13th line), and the word “today” (15th line upwards diagonally to 11th line).  I MUST POINT OUT once again that I am not altering the poem in any way here. These letters are THERE. I have not added them.  For the words “to hasten” to be coincidentally diagonal in the poem where I show them could be coincidental, but this is very doubtful.  Especially if we consider that we are to look “QUICKLY” down—and the words “to hasten” mean to cause something to happen more quickly. Though I do not know the exact reason, it appears we are “to hasten” in the search.

The last Acrostic in this example could be entirely coincidental, but again it is very doubtful that it is.  It is a VERY curious acrostic to be sure:   DAENISM.  This starts on the 11th line and spelling DAENISM downwards in a vertical manner to the 17th line.  What is strange about this acrostic is that the diagonals “birth”, “today” and “to hasten” could refer to it in some way.  I must point out clearly that I FIRST saw the acrostic, then googled it, not knowing what “DAENISM” even was.  Imagine my surprise when I saw that DAENISM is indeed a word, and that it has a very curious meaning to it. I did not know there was such a word before I saw the acrostic in the poem.  This acrostic has 7 letters that are THERE. Coincidental? You decide.

Please go to the following link:  https://particracy.fandom.com/wiki/Daenism  or simply google DAENISM.  It is actually a philosophy that someone at WIKI Fandom CREATED. They created it several years ago. The reason I mention this is due to my mention of Sequoyah in my first article.  Remember that Sequoyah INVENTED a written language for the Cherokee people. Could it be possible that Forrest in some way was involved in INVENTING a philosophy?  That sounds far-fetched, and Forrest may have NOTHING to do with this at all. It did cross my mind though, as Forrest is like Sequoyah.   Forrest does what HE wants to do and no one can stop him. There could very well be a connection.

An important aspect of DAENISM is its symbol: A WHEEL.  I mention this because mdc777 (a contributor to Dal’s blog) pointed out in one of his own YouTube videos that another searcher had found a way to reveal the words “TRY THE WHEEL” in the poem itself.  This is what shocked me when I found the acrostic “TRY AUSBYS” as a hint.  I shared this in my first article.  TRY AUSBYS.  TRY THE WHEEL.     Very curious indeed.  Could THE WHEEL be the wheel in DAENISM and not another wheel?  Again, I leave that for your consideration.  Again, google DAENISM to see its symbol is indeed a wheel.

Again, this first EXAMPLE of the poem has no PROVEN acrostic in it. I also do not know how these acrostics lead to the solution. They are curiosities and oddities.  As I proceed in future EXAMPLES though, I will add maps and photos to the mix.  Someone had stated I offered no photos or maps and should burn my ideas.  I will share photos, links and maps in upcoming articles that will become harder and harder to refute in my serious opinion.  I do want to EMPHASIZE once more though that I had not added to the poem, or moved anything around.  The words that are revealed to be acrostics are THERE.  I did not “cherry pick” them.  Accept or reject them. That is entirely up to you.

To be continued…….

-Sparrow

 

 

 

 

 

Sparrow’s Speculations…

words

August 2019
by Sparrow

Last year, about this same time, I wrote a short article called “Fishin’ Part 1” which can be found here if you are interested.

I had intended to write a “Fishin’ Part 2” at that time but decided to stay in the search for a while to see if maybe the lights would go on, and I might actually solve the riddle in the poem. Since another year has passed and I am still unable to solve it, I have decided to share some things that I have discovered during the last 3 years. I have never seen anyone share what I am about to so I hope that it enlightens someone, and helps toward a true solve.

I would like to share a few short articles containing things that have puzzled and amazed me over the last few years. I was originally going to share one long article, but decided maybe “bites” might be better so the things I share can really sink in and be of help to someone. I want to share some “speculations” in a couple of short articles, and finally a full solve I put together back in 2016 that I have always thought was good. (lol)

On July 27, 2016 I happened to be reading one of the News sources on the Internet (I have forgotten which one). I normally check CNN, ABC and FOX news to get a mix of the news. That fateful day there appeared an article about a man who had died (sadly) searching for the Treasure. I had never heard of the “Chase” before reading that article. I actually held myself back from reading it, as I feared I would be “hooked” on another treasure hunt (I had been involved in the TREASURE search for a golden horse back in 1984-1989 when I was younger). I read the story anyway. You guessed it—I was hooked on another treasure hunt—and have been “hooked” for 3 years now.

Now that I have decided to “let go” I want to share some unusual things that I have discovered during that time. My first “speculation” will be to share something I saw back on August 22, 2016 on Forrest’s 86th birthday. It was on Jenny Kile’s site “Mysterious Writings”. I had only been involved in the Chase for less than a month, but I was sure acrostics had something to do with solving the riddle in the poem. It may not be the ONLY thing required—but it definitely does involve acrostics. Let me show you why I believe this.
WHERE WARM WATERS HALT?

I had been very curious as to what the above set of words meant. Was it talking about water, rain, clouds, or rivers? Was there a special meaning to the words? I had once pondered whether “where warm waters halt” could be TEARS. Tears are warm. I knew that the “Trail of Tears” ends very close to Tulsa, Oklahoma, near the town of Talequah. The cabin for the Indian Sequoyah is near there. His English name was George Gist, and he was a silversmith. He was also disabled and limped. Sequoyah was a brilliant man who invented the written Cherokee language. It was an astonishing feat, and he has never had the recognition he deserved for having done this for his people. The name Gist was important to me, along with some of the other things concerning Sequoyah. The word “halt” always intrigued me, as “halt” in the Bible refers to a lame person. Sequoyah had a distinctive limp. Why would the “Chase” begin in Oklahoma? I do not know. If warm waters halt in Oklahoma, did Forrest begin there?

If he did start there, which direction did he go? Did he begin there and head southwest back towards New Mexico, or did he start there and head northwest towards Colorado, Wyoming of Montana? Is it possible that Forrest had left a meeting in one of those northern states, then flew to Tulsa Oklahoma, and then drove on to New Mexico? That would be the opposite direction than you would think he would have taken. Or had he rented a car there and driven north instead?

You may ask, Sparrow, why are you centering on Tulsa Oklahoma? Are you starting there because you “think” it might be the place? Is it because “tears”, and the coincidence that the “Trail of Tears” happens to end near where Sequoyah lived? Why would you think Oklahoma has anything to do with the Chase?
Let me explain why. During the short time I had been searching Forrest had made the statement that he hoped no one would check rental car agencies because there might be too much information involved. Then, shortly after on his birthday, 8-22-16, he left a cryptic message on “weekly words” on Jenny’s blog.
Here is his message of 8-22-16:
“Save your best smile until after you raise the lid.” f
https://mysteriouswritings.com/happy-birthday-forrest-fenn/

Most people would immediately think about the treasure chest. How happy someone would be once they had opened that lid and saw all of the glittering gold! Some said that maybe a camera was in the treasure chest, so that when opened it would snap a photo—so you should be smiling when it did take the picture. Many searchers left comments below the weekly words. I remember that I left words to the effect “OK, if you say so, but I have always preferred Enterprise”. No one commented back on what I had said at that time. You see, I look at the poem very differently than others do. I also look at sentences in a much different manner than others do. I constantly scan sentences for acrostics—it is just in my nature to do so. Let me show you what is actually in the sentence above. It is a hint given by Forrest—and most importantly, a hint given on his birthday. Did Forrest do something special on his birthday one year? Is that why he would share this hint on this very day?

Let us take a closer look at the sentence Forrest shared. We will begin by capitalizing all of the first letters in the words:
Save Your Best Smile Until After You Raise The Lid. f
The capital letters in acrostic form then spell out the following:
SYBSUAYRTL
I believe the “L” is actually there to tell what direction we should read the letters”
SYBSUAYRT  L
In other words, it is telling us to read from right towards the left.
If we now REVERSE the letters you will observe the following:
L TRYAUSBYS TRY AUSBYS (or “why not give Ausbys a shot?”)
Try Ausbys? What do you mean “Try Ausbys”? What is that supposed to mean? It helps if we go to this link—-it makes it much more clear:
https://www.ausbycarrentals.com/ You can also just Google “Ausby Car Rentals”.

You will notice that this car rental agency is small, and services Tulsa Oklahoma and Dallas Texas. As we all know Forrest is originally from Texas.

If Ausbys Car rentals are in Tulsa, Oklahoma, is Forrest hinting that he BEGAN his trip to hide the treasure near the very spot where the “Trail of Tears” comes to a halt? I believe that I can say without a doubt that I know the car rental agency Forrest used when hiding the treasure—-AUSBY CAR RENTALS. Or perhaps you are one of these people that will say “This is all coincidence. The fact that you can spell “TRY AUSBYS” with the letters in the sentence means nothing”.

I had actually shared this with two different searchers. One denied it meant anything—the other just said “Very interesting”.

I do not believe this is chance at all. Look at the sentence structure to “Save your best smile until after you raise the lid”. f It is created to hide a specific hint. I believe that hint refers to the rental car agency used to hide the Treasure. When? How many miles did he drive? Which direction did he go when he drove off in the rental? Towards New Mexico, or north towards the other three locations?
I think the answer to “When” is on his birthday. He shared this sentence on his 86th birthday—this is also a hint. But what year? A good detective might be able to find out the answers.

This is the first of a few “tidbits” that I would like to share over a few articles. Accept them or reject them. That is up to you. I offer this to help anyone who might be on the right track. I hope some future articles will also be of help. I am done. For further confirmation of my speculations please Google “Where does the trail of tears end?” To be continued……

-Sparrow

 

 

 

 

 

Most of a Biscuit Basin Solve…

biscuit

August, 2019

By James Collier

 

This is going to be a pretty in-depth post. Like a lot of other searchers, I believed I knew the exact location and took off to Dinosaur National Monument area but came up empty handed. Upon return to my home in Rock Hill, SC, I decided to read TTOTC 5 more times and dissect every word. My approach this time was to read it slowly, to listen carefully, and make sure I had an imagination along with an open mind. To basically read it like a 10-15-year-old might. I went through every chapter and wrote down what I thought were clues. Although Fenn says the clues are “subtle,” I believe they ARE deliberate and direct you to within a 1.5 mile radius of the treasure. Come along on this journey through the book and try to see it like a child would. Open your eyes. Open your mind. Like John Lennon said…”Imagine.”  

Clues to why I think it is where I say it is:

Important Literature Chapter

  1. Multiple references to “little girl.”
  2. Reference to “mud” when referencing the bell tolls book
  3. “I didn’t spend much time in the children’s section or cooking or travel. Finally, I found the area I was looking for.” 
  4. When talking about the Kismet book, he makes sure to specify “the Pick-Pocket guy that is.” This comment should be obvious, so why put it? (I think he Is bringing notice to Pocket Basin (biggest mud pots in Yellowstone).

First Grade Chapter

  1. “My father always said she wouldn’t bite a hard biscuit if she was starving to death.” (First reference of many to biscuits)

No Place For Biddies Chapter

  1. References to “young.”
  2. Meek may mean crossing the street at the location…although I found a different reference which at this time I cannot share as it puts me in a very specific location. 

Jump Starting The Learning Curve Chapter

  1. Reference to “Cross the River.”
  2. Reference to Fire
  3. Looked corroded (Could be reference to Rusty Geyser across the street)
  4. Second reference to Biscuits when talking about his dad
  5. Iron, slide-down fire escape (Could be reference to Iron Springs Creek down from Fire Hole River). He also references in another chapter the Spring Creek. 
  6. He was proud to think of that idea and was the only one who knew about that trick. Old Iron thing marked the tail of his britches with a heavy brown color. (Another mention of Iron and brown as color).
  7. Everyone who was walking behind me knew what I done. People were beginning to notice me. (I think he is referencing he was on his way back from hiding the chest when people started to notice him as he walked back to his car; either the first time or second time).

Bessie And Me Chapter

  1. References to Milk multiple times which I think refers back to ingredients needed to make biscuits

My Spanish Toy Factory Chapter

  1. Unnecessary reference to being hungry and brown bag (Once again, referencing food and the color brown to food).
  2. Pie factory reference
  3. Pineapple pies

Me In The Middle Chapter

  1. Being in the middle again (I think this is a reference to being in the middle where those rivers meet.

Surviving Myself Chapter

  1. Kitchen reference with more baking
  2. Making own butter
  3. Another reference to biscuits
  4. When he is discussing what they wanted for dessert he states “I always said I wanted strawberry shortcake. His brother would want pineapple-upside-down cake. June, she “Liked something else.” He never referenced what exactly it is that she wanted. He then goes on to say she would trim the edges off of several slices of homemade bread and then cut the pieces into fourths. When they came BROWN out of the oven, she’d put butter and different homemade jams on each piece and serve them hot. They always made a big deal out of taking a bite and saying “umm, mom, great strawberry shortcake,” and “ummm, mom, great pineapple upside down cake.” I can still remember how much my dessert tasted JUST LIKE WHAT I ASKED FOR, AND IN MY FANTASY WAY IT WAS.” 

This whole paragraph informs me that the food his sister June wanted was biscuits. When referencing biscuits in clue #2&3 in this chapter they talked about butter and putting homemade jams on them. He then references it here again once they came out of the oven BROWN and they put the jams on each piece. He then states he can still remember how much dessert tasted just like what he asked for and in his fantasy was it was…because it wasn’t what him and his brother wanted, it was biscuits. 

Gypsy Magic Chapter

  1. Here he talks about how five or six girls of all ages built a large fire and danced around it. Keep this in mind for the later chapter talking about the painting he purchased
  2. Uses the word “firelight.”
  3. Use of the word “flames.”

In Love With Yellowstone Chapter

  1. Agate rocks along the rivers
  2. Rationed usage could be a reference to food again

Totem Café Caper Chapter

  1. Water and hiding behind a tree
  2. Brown gravy 
  3. Another food reference to pies
  4. Hid behind a pine tree 

My Brother Being Skippy Chapter

  1. Chinese Fire drill (I think this is the only clue in the chapter and just wants to drive home the fire reference).

The Long Ride Home Chapter

  1. “Greatest blossom” to me is a reference to a tree or flower blossoming as when he referenced the yellow and purple flowers. 

Looking For Lewis And Clark Chapter & Buffalo Cowboy chapters

  1. The only thing I took from these chapters was the nod to Yellowstone, as well as multiple references to food again. 

Stout Hearted Men Chapter

  1. Here I am taking the subtle hint to where my final spot is. Under a tree in the middle of a field has been my go-to final solve. “I slept under a tree with cows grazing all around. It was a threshold moment in my life, but I didn’t know it at the time.”

My War For Me Chapter

  1. A lot of talk about fire here which to me goes along with the gypsies

Blue Jeans And Hush Puppies Again

  1. Here I am taking the clue of him buying the French watercolor painting of the fairies dancing around a rock “if you believe I’d come to that.” I believe this is in reference to two clues. 
  1. Butterfly is a Flutterby (kids toy “flutterbye fairy”)
  2. Fairy creek/Little Firehole river 
  3. Believes a kid will find it as kids are the only ones who believe in fairies

There are other references in the final chapters but they are very small and would be a stretch. 

So now let me put it all together and add the information to the poem. 

Forest Fenn Poem & Clues

Begin It Where Warm Waters Halt 

Ojo Caliente Spring

Take It In the Canton Down,

Not far, but too far to walk

Put in below the home of Brown

 Biscuit Basin due to the multiple references of biscuits and them coming out of the oven “brown,” as biscuit basin from Ojo Caliente Springs is almost exactly 10 miles driving

a

From there it’s no place for the meek

The end is ever drawing nigh;

There’ll be no paddle up your creek, 

Just heavy loads and water high 

  • Park the car at the entrance to the unmarked trail on the right-hand side of the road. Enter there and walk/wade across the Iron Springs Creek towards where Fairy Falls Creek/Little Firehole River, Mystic Falls and Summit Lake all meet. Heavy loads (falls), Water High (Summit Lake would literally translate to high water). The double Omega symbol in the back of the book can translate to Summit

If you’ve been wise and found the blaze,

Look quickly down, your quest to cease,

But tarry scant with marvel gaze,

Just take the chest and go in peace.

  • Will not know for sure until you are walking with boots on the ground. But recently I found a really good match to Meek and tarry scant. At this time I am not willing to share this as I am trying to get to Yellowstone first week of September. 

So why is it that I must go and leave my trove for all to seek?

The answers I already know, I’ve done it tired, and now I’m weak.

  • He is now resting under a tree as he did when he was tired in the story

So hear me all and listen good, your effort will be worth the cold.

  • You have to wade through water to get to the final spot

If you are brave and in the wood, I give you title to the gold.

  • Once across the water you will be walking through the woods to the final spot. I believe the chest is inside a piece of wood at the base of a tree with the blaze marking either on the tree or next to it. 

Let me know what y’all think. If someone thinks this is a great solve and heads out there before I can get there, and you just so happen to find it…just remember who directed you there. LOL! Good luck everyone!

– James Collier

 

 

 

 

The Dream Solve…

July, 2019

By Yellowdog

First off, if you are thinking that by Dream Solve, I mean the ultimate solve, like Dream Machine or Dream Team, sorry, you will have to read elsewhere.  This is definitely not that type of Dream Solve
What you are about to read is a true and accurate accounting—at least as much as one can hope for when jotting down as many recollections as possible after waking from a second grade rendition of the The Wizard of Oz induced treasure chase dream.  What the heck am I talking about, you wonder?  Imagine about 40 “proud” parents, grandparents, siblings and sadistic people in small 96 degree room, all watching their 1st-ish through 4th-ish grader perform an hour long version of the classic movie.  I really felt sorry for the Cowardly Lion.  She was probably melting just as much as the Wicked Witch of the West.  But I have ventured down a rabbit hole—not the first to do that in the chase, hey?
So after the excruciatingly painful low-budget production, the gal I am seeing [let’s just call her “Kim”] was putting the mighty and powerful Wizard to bed.  Me, I was relaxing on the couch.  Well, somewhere between 9:30 and 10:00 as I was lying there recovering from the performance, I ended up dozing off. And this is what happened…
Within the next 90 minute or so window, I had a very vivid dream that the treasure had been found. In the dream, “Kim” was crying.  When I asked what was up, she said someone had just beat her to it. This is odd in and of itself, because she is not even a searcher and kind of makes fun of me for being involved in the chase. Anyway, as it turned out, a team of searchers had just retrieved the treasure.
In my dream, Indulgence was located in Montana.
I was curious as to the final solve and started talking with the team that retrieved it. Interestingly enough, they were a team of six working together but each had their own individual solve. So when I had asked 2 or 3 people how they found it. They didn’t even know. They were just under direction of the leader du jour.
So here is how it all played out…  Indulgence was found on the grounds of a state university campus in Montana, but even in the dream it was still unclear witch (see what I did there): Billings, Bozeman, Missoula or Helena. So I started asking about the clues to the one who directed/lead the find. And the answers were horrible.
It was something along the lines of:
warm waters halt = the flagpole or the fountain at the front of Memorial Union (ISU had a Memorial Union) [Memorial, tears, parents dropping off kids, whatever]

Canyon down = take Canyon Drive down the hill

Home of brown = Brown House…  (when I was in school at ISU, buildings were halls, and floors were houses)

So the chase started, begin at Memorial Union courtyard, and take Canyon Drive down the hill, until you see Brown House…  This was the $#ittie$t solve I had ever heard…
That is pretty much about all I remember, oh other than the final resting place.  Indulgence was located beneath a bench sitting under a statuesque Cherry tree.
In my groggy state, my mind started going down rabbit holes and grasping at straws and piecing together bits of information in ways that it shouldn’t.
The woodsman illustration—George Washington—Cherry Tree (CLICK)
Education—too late to get any—sign over school house—wasn’t going to college because father and he didn’t think he could make it (CLICK)
And there was one other thing (CLICK), a Spanish word (CLICK)
Spanish class—teacher talking in Spanish—etc (CLICK)
In my dream the word was Fortunada? or Fortunas? In my dream, I thought that (whatever the word was), it meant to be fortunate, but it actually meant Treasure—the Treasure—Indulgence—The Treasure State. (CLICK)
Ahh…  All the tumblers had rotated into place and the puzzle pieces were starting to fit!
And then the fog began to lift.  As it did, I began to feel both elated and saddened at the same time.  Elated because it was just a bad dream and the treasure hadn’t really been found. Saddened, because even in my dreams I couldn’t piece the clues together, and was watching as someone else found Indulgence.
Happy Searching, All…  And Best of Luck…

Yellowdog in WA

By the way, just to rebate you 3 minutes of your life back:
Fortunada = nothing
Furtunadamente = Fortunately
Fortunas = Fortunes
Tesoro = Treasure