Through the Looking-Glass…

January, 2019

By Jonas

 

 

I’ve been fighting with this puzzle for more than a week now. I know that isn’t a long time for some of you in the chase community but I’m a very impatient man and must get rid of the itching an unsolved problem cause. I chose to make this public on HOD since I’m a Swedish resident and do not intend to go and get the treasure and I’m not sure I’ve legally could claim it if I wanted to. Before I present my solution I would like to express my gratitude to Mr Forrest Fenn – thank you sir, it’s been a thrill. Given my solution is right you are surely a genial architect. So here we go (I will try to keep it short).
The equivocal mirror solution.

Since I’ve first saw the poem I was sure the first paragraph is about losing yourself in the world of literature and art. I know Forrest Fenn said the purpose of the chase was to get out in the wild but I think that’s only half of it the other half is about educate yourself. A sort of body and life harmony in life and thereby the mirrored solutions.

I will reference the ”Wildlife reflection” as ”a)” and the ”Mind reflection” as ”b)”.
”Begin it where warm waters halt”

Using basic physics. Water, when heated rises and halt on the surface. First I was interpreting this as ”at the top” but I now know that it is the ”surface”.

a) Surface Creek by the Yellowstone River
b) Two Mile Reservoir outside Santa Fe (from now on this is what gives me the distance)
”And take it in the canyon down,”

a) Follow the Canyon (2 miles straight line)
b) Follow Canyon Rd (2 miles straight line)
”Not far, but to far to walk.”

a) I havet o get to the other side of the river
b) ” If Paris wasn’t so far away” (The Golden Road, L M Montgomery 1913). Paris, Texas is the birthplace of the Brown I am heading to.
”Put in below the home of Brown.”

”And then ‘mome raths’?” said Alice. “If I’m not giving you too much trouble.”
“Well a ‘rath’ is a sort of green pig, but ‘mome’ I’m not certain about. I think it’s sort for ‘from home’–meaning that they’d lost their way, you know.”

(Through The Looking Glass, Lewis Carroll 1871)
a) Lookout Point were Grafton Tyler Brown painted ”View of the Lower Falls, Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone” 1890
b) The Irby Brown Gallery in Santa Fe
Jumping past a couple of lines in the poem since they don’t take me any further.

”There’ll be no paddle up your creek,”

a) Alum Creek (3 miles straight line)
””I wonder if it’s where we buried it yet,” Speculated Felix.
”I put a stone over it, just as we did over Pat,” said Cecily”
(The Golden Road, L M Montgomery 1913)

This is where you go if ”you’ve been wise” (Bring a sandwich a flashlight)

b) Santa Fe Public Library, La Fargo Branch (3 miles straight line)
””I read it in a book”, said Alice.”
(Through The Looking Glass, Lewis Carroll 1871)

This is were you go to get wise (Bring a sandwich and a flash lamp –  to burn the midnight oil)
Again, thank’s for the thrill!

-Jonas

 

 

 

 

 

Gardner River…

December, 2018

By David Brinkley

 

Ok…here it is..90% solved. Where warm waters halt is Gardner Mont. (Treasure Island hint in TTOTC) Take it in the canyon down is to drive (to far to walk) south (down on a map) till you cross the big bridge over the Gardner river just past Mammoth Springs. Park immediately first parking area on the right. In Yellowstone they call them “pull outs” but we are parking, so “put in” BTW..the Gardner river is home of Brown ( trout, and they can’t swim upstream past Osprey falls) Make your way on left side of river, (nigh), upstream, toward Sheepeater Canyon (no place for meek) and Osprey falls. The “no paddle up your creek” is meaningless and not a clue. “Heavy loads and water high” are Osprey Falls. Heavy loads part refers to the Air Force V22 Osprey designed for heavy load lifting AND water high is the falls. Mr. Fenns nod to the USAF. Grassy area near a waterfall was significant to Forrest in ‘Nam and the tombstone of the forgotten soldier. The Blaze is a stone shaped either by chance or purpose, like a tombstone. I think then you either look quickly south to the spot where the chest is. It will be obvious once your there. ( “down” meant south earlier in the poem) that’s why he said a compass would be handy. Maybe you look actually down to the ground but I don’t think so. Forrest doesn’t want to be like that Soldier that passed on with no fanfare or glory. I won’t get out West to get the chest myself…I know this…but I also know this solve is correct…every single clue fits

 

 

 

Pike’s Stockade…

November, 2018

By Amanda

 

This solve is mostly on private property so you will have to get permission from the owners to go in there. And that doesn’t mean they will let you. To do that you will have to either knock on some doors to figure out who the owner is or go to the assessor’s office.  I have only driven by and stopped on the county road stayed in my car to get my bearings but I do not suggest doing that. It is a good solve to look at in Google earth.

 

As I have (sieve) gone alone (lone, one) in there (hare-rabbit)
And (end) with my treasures (miter) bold (bowled),
I can keep (keap) my secret (seek ret) where (hare, weir),
And hint (indent) of riches new and (wand) old.

Begin it (ginnett ) where (weir or hare) warm waters halt (military term for rest)
And take (tack it like a sail boat) it in the canyon down,
Not far, but too (24) far to walk.
Put in below (be low) the home (ohm) of Brown (round).

From there it’s (rets) no place for the meek (meeke), (lacet?)
The end is ever (sever) drawing (a draw) nigh (nye); 
There’ll be (reel) no paddle (pattle) up your creek (the act of walking in shallow water),

Just heavy (juiste) (V) loads and (sand) water high.

 If you’ve been (bean) wise (wisen) and found the blaze (Z) (belays, Belize),
Look (loke) quickly down, your quest (stow, west?) to cease (cees),
But tarry (ute ) scant (secant) with marvel gaze (gaize) (V),

Just take (stake or tack) the chest and (stand) go in peace

So (sow soe) why (Y) is it that I (tie) must go (geo)
And leave (levee) my trove (rove) for all to seek (secant?)
The answers I (eye) already (reedy or red) know,
I’ve done it tired (tiered, tied or red)(McIntyre springs), and now I’m weak ( weck) and barely visible).

So (sow, soe) hear me (heme or army arm, mall) all and (land) listen (list) good (goode),
Your effort (reef)(fort)will be worth (bow or earth) the cold (cole or col).
If you (hue) are brave and (ravine) in the (dent)(hue) wood (woad)
I give you (ute) title (tittle) to the gold (geo, heg or toggle).

 Look on a map and you will see the following NEAR the fort (Pikes Stockade)( army) at 24 and Y (24 too far to walk) roads 24 south as it veers left and ends (a loke OR THE END). The Conejos river (meaning rabbit) meandering river and all the agriculture associated with the valley such as growing the grain for Coors beer (wizen).  Growing beans cabbage (cole) with cows and steak.  Cutting hay. Also a lot of tarry scant (grease wood).  In winter you want to be n the other side so you don’t have to cross the freezing river. Follow road V out of Sandford CO go left on W it is a paved one lane road.  You will see saddleback mt and once you cross the Conjeos River look to the left.  The Sierro del Ojioto just a small hill is not impressive as it is no more than a sand pit (geo, white gaize) that is the blaze as it gazes up with it’s eyes about the size of small swimming pool with another weird looking eye.  You can see it from the road.  There are no trespassing signs everywhere so you have to ask the owner.(Google map view not in satellite mode) you will see 2 large Cs looks a lot like the omegas but only in map mode. One is in the circle of irrigation crops. I drove by several times and thought what a yucky place but to each his own.

WWWH is the warm spring at McIntire Springs where it goes into the cold Conjeos river an archeology dig at near sierra del ojito (small hill) yielded several things including writing (tarry scant)(see link at bottom of page)  so the hill is the home of the Brown the Ute many arrowheads also were found hence all the references to arrows in the poem. Pikes Stockade contained a pvt. john brown and sgt meek was one of his pikes men (don’t know if meek made it over there though. Near Sanford (sand) near sierra del ojito (eyes and dents sand) near saddleback mt (col – the lowest point of a ridge or saddle) near Lassuas meaning reedy N of V road.

  1. Solve 1. Sierro del Ojito This is private property so I assume either the first house or the one further back are the owners I do not know.  So again ask first. Should be in the irrigation ditch (you have to go in there put yourself in)directly below the white eye aka the blaze behind the trailer house and before the river to the north (just a round pile of sand) oyos you can see it in map quest it is in the shape of a V.  A newer ditch than the others. I am thinking it is at the corner where it changes direction in a mitre 90 degrees the corner but anywhere along that ditch might have to follow it back toward the spring or the other way.  It looks like other ditches are around too so it may be in one of the other ones too. If its in one of the older ditches I would think it would be closer to the sand pit. It should be barely visible however it has been several years so if one has a metal detector you could go faster. I assume there is a little water in the big v shaped ditch but maybe not during the winter. I don’t know if it involves a rope and spike but fyi in case I may be off on that . If you go in summer many rattlesnakes beware no place for the meek. Also means you can’t plow there. 
  1. Solve 2. Start at the end of 24 road by pikes stockade. Will have to cross the river (walk barefoot through shallow water) unless you start on the other side if its winter North of Saddleback Mt in There is a small dam (weir or levee) in the shape of a V.  Cross the river. There is a large irrigation reel tiered (water high and heavy loads with a generator )(ret-watering). Irrigation makes a loud sound (hear me).could be described as a Secant with a wand, there should be a small ravine a draw, a geo with red hew tint probably oxidized metal ore–the (heme iron stained reef or metallic looking if not red) blaze near some trees perhaps a dry stream where the treasure will be barely visible. Might be some muddy water near might be in a dent. Possibly a generator or electric near supplying the irrigation or near where the water source.  Might mean belays or stakes tied to something. Might find the treasure right in there.
  1. Solve 3. Might be in the warm spring (soe a warm bucket also means warm, rope) or a bucket like thing like a well or a trough or a bucket under a windmill. Very near one of the arms..Look for tin, lid, projecting part of something, toggle a stake, a tine, stand or rope. A soe might be in McIntyre spring There is one tree near the spring and a dam. Lots of white rock around

I initially thought that the whole san luis valley was wwwh as it is a closed basin and mt Blanca was the blaze as you can see it from the whole valley.

Tittle-small part of something or the dot above a j or i. or teat as in bird or nib-small pointed projecting part

Rove-meander or a sliver of cotton fiber drawn out (rope?) and slightly twisted for preparing to spin or a small metal place or ring or Rove-archery term

Marble gaize-white rock

Geo-small fiord or gulley

Bellow-roar

Nye-flock of birds

Wizen-grain for making beer

Miter bisecting 90 degrees or like mitre tapering to a point in front or back a v

Belays-spike of rock used for tying off a rope or the rope

Keap-concerning agriculture

Weck-weck grain for bread

Ginnet- mule

Billow-spiral

Weir-low dam across river

Juiste-right extended piece

Pattle-small spade to get dirt off plough

Onan-type of generator

Reef- a metalliferous mineral deposit especially one that contains gold

Stow-deposit

Friche-fallow land

Loke-dead end lane

Velga-meadow

Heg-a barrier that serves to enclose an area,

Lacet- knot on a rope

Mall-a sheltered walk or promenade.

Woad=yellow flower scrub ragwort

 

http://legacy.historycolorado.org/sites/default/files/files/OAHP/Programs/PAAC_PikeStockade_Survey_Report_nomap.pdf

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Pikes+Stockade+(replica)/@37.2809337,-105.8349851,14.25z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:0xec515ac32dfdcdc!8m2!3d37.2940897!4d-105.8103501

see the two horseshoe shaped water areas or oxbows

 

 

 

 

 

The Greater Yellowstone Medicine Wheel……

SUBMITTED JUNE 2018
by John edo

 

You know I can’t leave well enough alone. After doing the “Holy Blazes” post here on the home of Dal and receiving some feed-back; I was just about ready to throw away this search area. The face at the Firehole, the mark in the tree at the bottom of Tom’s trail, and the owl of Minerva tetradrachm just seemed to be too coincidental. I went back to my first clue and it didn’t seem right. Cynthia had posted about the sign at Reynolds Pass on the border of Idaho and Montana and got response post form Forrest that he had never seen the sign in winter. It happens to fall on the continental divide splitting 2 watersheds to the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Begin where warm waters halt. Halt means lame, limp, foolish. And there has to be some connection from this clue to the next and to the end as they are contiguous. Following from Reynolds pass to “the canyon” down. The canyon seems to imply an obvious choice as due East of Reynolds pass is the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. It happens to also pass over an arrowhead pointing that direction and reminded me of Young Forrest’s arrowhead. Take it means to grasp, and hints at riches new and old treasures.

At the bottom of tom’s trail was this mark in the tree.

Not far, but too far implies that the clues are opposites and spaced apart from one another. The opposites and balance made me think of the medicine wheel and using the Lakota star map I tried to connect the rest of the clues.

Put in below the home of brown still makes me scratch my head, as put in can mean to launch a boat or also put in means solitary confinement. There is also a “t” and a “bel” in that line that make the word belt. The star map has the milky way in the back ground or the belt of Orion is the 3 stars in the wrist of the hand constellation. The stars are also known as “Las Tres Marias” or the 3 Marys. In Yellowstone there is a Mary mountain West, East, and middle, and they happen to form a straight line.

So home could be a flat, narrow area and that makes me think of the fire escape and making his pants brown when he skipped class. He could leave and be alone. The slide was also a gateway and I believe it to be Devils’s slide. The next line of the poem seems to confirm that as from there its no place for the meek. From there sounds like from mother it’s to place for them. At the end of the line the word mother can also be found backwards and jumbled: no place fOR THE Meek. So your mother’s mother is your grandmother and devils slide happens to be at the point of castor and pullox on the star chart. Castor and Pullox happen to be twins just like Forrest’s grandmother A line from devils slide to mammoth hot springs continues to no place for them. Opposite of mother is father, and opposite of fire is water. Water has an old definition of Adam’s ale, and line continues to Yellowstone Lake fishing bridge. But no place for them is the RV park just to the East.

The end is ever drawing nigh, sounds like the hand is severed drawing in eye. So the Lakota circle coming back to the eye in the Firehole and looking up to mirror plateau gives you another line that runs right thru the Grand canyon of Yellowstone. Mirror Plateau happens to be the Pleiades star on the Lakota star map. From the face you also have mire or stuck in the mud to admire yourself in the mirror; hence all the me, mine, and I comments by Forrest.

There’ll be no paddle up your creek took me a while to figure out. “LL” when sounding out, sounds like ells. Ells are 90 degree pipe bends and no paddle refers to water. Just above the Firehole at the Madison river and Firehole river junction, the river makes a perpendicular “T”; and so there are the ells. So not going up that creek we are heading down.

Just heavy loads and water high made perfect sense after figuring out the no paddle clue. Heading straight down from eye, the grand prismatic spring and old faithful fell into place. They also aligned to stars on the Lakota map. Procyon is the blossom, and the grand spring is just that. Beautiful all year around! Old faithful is water high, or Sirius.  Some of you might know about Sirius and being known as the dog star, and I would never insult Peggy in that way, but rather as the most faithful companion in Forrest’s life. That’s why the heavy loads is a halo he’s putting on Peggy. She is his saint and the ode to Peggy speaks volumes of his love and affection for her. The reference to backwards bicycle also fits to work clues backwards from water high, and ride bike to water high and throw it in.

Just in this line is also right, which back from the point of the arrow and looking from direction of eye, is right following the N,S,W,E of the compass.

If you have been wise and found the blaze. I still struggle with this one. Is the found the blaze an established beginning or a central marker? The lines don’t exactly line up to the center. It’s almost like they still need to be made right. In the upper right of the Lakota star map is Capella or buffalo gap which is the Lamar Valley. The star Rigel is also known as the silver star and is dot island in the “hand” of Yellowstone Lake. The silver star was also an award given to Forrest for his service in Vietnam.

Betelgeuse is known as “owl eyes flicking”, or watching the ceremonies, and is the only point not on this map. I believe it’s a reference to his father the wise owl looking down upon him burning candles at both ends.

Look quickly down at the lower falls at the right time of day and you will see a rainbow or should I say moonbow. Across from Uncle Tom’s Trail it also looks like a petroglyph of a horse’s head drinking from the falls. This is also a dead end and your quest will cease here.

The points fit in a circle as well. The center seems to be Grebe Lake, but the points line up to the lower falls. The points also almost line up to tarry point if you google search it. If mirror plateau moves to amethyst mountain they are right on.

So there you have the medicine wheel in Yellowstone. The symbol and lines still seem to be halted or lame clues, and nothing has been unlocked to the location of the chest. There is still much more in the poem to listen too.  But; tells you to join the tarry scant and marvel gaze. In the medicine wheel there is a bald center spot, and when overlaid that is a short distance south of the lower falls. The MA-RV-EL gaze is the direction to head. MA is mammoth, RV is by the fishing bridge, and EL is the line, or the track of the train you would get hit by.

Here comes the word Just again. And it’s to take the chest and go in peace. But I see it as the chi stand or balance, or like Forrest: ME in the middle. Peace is that balance, the harmony, the health and wellspring.

So why must you go? It’s the way of life to run the race and return to where you came. Mother Earth, Gaia. And the trove is left to each of us to find our own way, and we should be actively seeking to better the lives of those around us; Smile at a homely girl!

The a(NSWE)rs he already knows? Of course; they are the points of life, the map of where one has been; and you are tired and weak as you have exhausted your life in pursuit of those answers.

HEAR comes the big kicker. Listen to the words in the poem to the gold now.

Sow ear meal and list ten good, your fort twill be worthy cold.

If few are brave and dint hew wood dig ivey out it lead to the gold.

WHAT? Did you hear that? Or did you read between the lines. Use that same logic and read thru the poem again.

Let’s also a-JUST a couple of those clues to unlock the poem. The circle with a dot in the center is used by Native Americans as the symbol for mother. It’s also the symbol for gold. So with the circle and line we can adjust them to form the symbol for woman and standing it upright she becomes the guardian of the gold: “when she sees it”.

I’m starting to trail off and leaving information out, but this essay is getting longer than I thought. I am definitely not hoping for an “A”, but rather an “F”!

-John edo

 

Armchair Thoughts From the UK……

SUBMITTED june 2018
by NICOUK

 

Armchair thoughts from the UK

I first came across Forrest Fenn in the news following an unfortunate tragedy for one treasure seeker.  A google search later and I was hooked on the mystery and challenge, the map and poem both being readily available.  I love a good mystery and love the great outdoors.  Being in the UK I can’t get my boots on the ground so to speak due to health issues.  Thank heavens for the internet!   Like anyone, I may be way off the mark with my theories and interpretations.  However near or far I am from the real location I hope that whoever eventually finds the treasure lets us all know the location, anonymously or not.  

In my search I’ve read a lot of different theories and snippets in addition to the poem and map, but those things have just reaffirmed my chosen location, correct or not, to me. I’m sure others may have already thought of it.

Having read through the poem several times I finally settled on the nine clues being between ‘begin’ and ‘cease’, which might seem obvious in some ways. I think most of the rest of the poem is a very personal narrative from FF.

‘Begin it where warm waters halt’
Within about an hour I decided to centre my search on Colorado, based on a combination of maps and feeling. I then came upon the town of Poncha Springs. The town was founded in 1880 because of the hot springs. The springs were capped in 1935. The town calls itself the ‘gateway to the Rockies’. It is also on Highway 285 north of Santa Fe, NM (possible take on 8.25?).

‘And take it in the canyon down’
You never go up into a canyon, so I didn’t think this so much as a navigational pointer, more of an instruction to head to a canyon.

‘Not far, but too far to walk’
My guess is this refers to the fact that Browns Creek is too far to walk from Poncha Springs, but head up Highway 285 and then on county road 271 and you can get to parking for Browns Creek Trailhead. (You could also start in the Gunnison direction and follow the trail from higher elevations where there is also parking, but that didn’t work for the clues for me).

‘Put in below the home of Brown’
Browns Creek trail/waterfall (not Little Browns Creek)

‘From there it’s no place for the meek’
You have to head off the trail to Browns Creek waterfall and then I believe you have to head off track to the treasure site.

‘The end is ever drawing nigh’
The waterfall is on the left if you approach following my route and a waterfall is a termination of sorts.

‘There’ll be no paddle up your creek’
If you see the creek and trail this is not cryptic at all.

‘Just heavy loads and water high’
I’ve taken this literally as the waterfall and impending treasure.

‘If you’ve been wise and found the blaze’
I believe that this is the waterfall; a beautiful cascading waterfall which creates quite a large blaze.

‘Look quickly down your quest to cease’
There are several possible rock shelters on the falls where the water has eroded behind the waterfall. They are generally easy to explore areas and can be quite large in waterfalls of this type and size. There are also a few possibilities alongside the waterfall, but my belief is behind.

I then cross checked my chosen solve with other comments and potential clues;

It’s a natural formation that’s existed for thousands of years and will for thousands more, although not in the same form.

It fits the elevation.
It’s not dangerous if your wear the right gear.
It’s behind, not under water.
It’s reasonable to get to for young and old.
There is car parking not too far.
Plus others that have just sought to affirm my choice.

The main web sources, aside from Google Maps and Wikipeadia were;

http://www.rainingfaith.com/10-days-on-the-colorado-trail-south-cottonwood-creek-to-browns-creek/

https://www.hikingproject.com/trail/7010626/browns-creek-trail-1429

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=n7dLm2NINlQ

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FhACkk4hGFs

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=8U3huT6ZpTo

http://www.hikingwalking.com/index.php/destinations/co/co_cent/buena_vista/browns_lake/browns_lake_detail

https://hikearizona.com/decoder.php?ZTN=20267&V=10

https://hikearizona.com/decoder.php?ZTN=20267

https://hikearizona.com/decoder.php?ZTN=20267&ZIP=587105

https://hikearizona.com/photo.php?ZIP=587099

https://mtprinceton.com/colorado/browns-creek-water-fall-trail/

https://www.benchmarkmaps.com/

http://fennclues.com/m.hints-and-clues-fenn-treasure.html

https://www.oldsantafetradingco.com/the-thrill-resource-page

https://dalneitzel.com/cheat-sheet/

https://www.npr.org/2016/03/13/469852983/seeking-adventure-and-gold-crack-this-poem-and-head-outdoors

Like with any possible seeker I would love to know how near or far my possible solve is. Hopefully if and when the treasure is found the finder will let us all know.

Happy hunting!

NicoUK

Homestead Meadows Solve……

SUBMITTED MAY 2018
by TIM O

 

I wanted to share my thoughts on a possible solve in the Homestead Meadows area of Colorado- there are a few things that jump out at me right away-

  • As I have gone alone in there= Hermit Park-See map below
  • Begin it where warm waters halt/Your effort will  be worth the cold= not an actual body of water- Possibly an old ice chest
  • From there it’s no place for the meek=Lion Gulch Trail/Lion Head peak- see map
  • Not far, but too far to walk= drove past Hermit park and down into Kruger Rock Trail-see map
  • Home of Brown= the old Brown Homestead
  • No Paddle up your creek=no actual body of water and/or dried up creek
  • If you have been wise and have found the blaze= actual fire in 2002 here
  • If you are brave and in the wood= possibly in/under one of the other homesteads or old ice chest..
  • Elevation fits within the parameters mentioned previously
  • Forrest could certainly walk 1 ½ miles to 2 miles x 2 in one day

I think some of the other solves I have seen are just far to complex- this may be some out of the box thinking but this is what it will take for somebody to find the chest..

Please keep me in mind if somebody does find the treasure and please feel free to email me at timothyponeil@gmail.com if you would like to discuss further..

-Tim O

Fishin’ Part 1……

SUBMITTED MAY 2018
by SPARROW

 

It’s been almost two years now and I still have no idea where Forrest Fenn hid his Treasure. I have decided that I will search no more, but I did want to share a few things that have intrigued me during my search, before I let go and return to reality (lol).  Often, when fishing, someone may ask you “Have you caught anything?” One answer that can be given to help assuage the feeling of being “skunked” is to say “No, but I have had a few nibbles” (or “bites”). 

So what I am sharing in the rest of this article are just “nibbles”, because the truth is I haven’t caught anything. I am not a very good writer, so I would ask that you bear with me as I share these little trinkets with you. I often visit the Blogs, so very early on in my search I began to see things in the writings of Forrest Fenn, especially in the “questions and answers” pieces that he has shared with us. Here are a few of the things I have seen that just might be “hints” from Forrest in regards to HOW we should be investigating his poem.  Hopefully one of these little discoveries might help another searcher along the way, and possibly lead them to the correct solution to this amazing treasure hunt.

Jesse, I am a fan of Georgia O’Keefe. But not her work, and my opinion was no mystery to her. She said I was a LOW BROW. I countered with a comment something like, “who says you have to be a SNOB to enjoy art?”—from “Featured Question with Forrest Fenn, Georgia O’Keefe,”(September 1, 2015), Mysterious Writings Blog.

When I first began the search at the end of July, 2016 I began to regularly visit the blogs. I began digging into some of the older articles on the Mysterious Writings blog (hosted by Jenny Kile), and the writings and Scrapbooks on blog hosted by Dal Neitzel.  When I read the above question/answer between a writer named Jesse and Forrest I immediately remembered something I had seen in the poem itself. Why was Forrest using the words “snob” and “lowbrow” in the discussion? Somehow I didn’t think the words themselves were hints, but possibly how they were arranged in the poem was a hint of importance.

When I recalled that the words were in the poem (see above) I wondered whether Forrest was hinting that part of the puzzle might be solved using acrostics, and not necessarily orthodox ones either. The word SNOB would be considered orthodox, as it is exactly (5) letters in from the right on all lines. But the word LOWBROW combined two types of acrostics: a diagonal one counting in 2-3-4-5 from the right, and then meeting with another acrostic, BROW, which is part of a word flowing from left to right. This acrostic was in an “L” shape which greatly intrigued me, as Forrest had mentioned “ells” in some of his stories. Was the “L” shape significant in some way? This put me on a path of looking for acrostics in the poem which I do believe is ONE aspect used to hide hints and clues in the poem. It did lead to seeing some interesting things. Unfortunately I can only consider these “nibbles” as the elusive fish (solution) remained aloof.

As I continued my search I found in the same sentences shown above another “L” shaped acrostic that also intrigued me due to what it ultimately spells. It involves aligning the 17th letter from the left on three lines meeting with three letters in a line flowing from left to right:

  17th letter from left

Andtakeitinthecanyondown

  Notfarbuttoofartowalk

 Putinbelowthehomeofbrown

What makes this intriguing is that the N-O-E letters are all exactly on the 17th letter from the left and then down. When combined with the C-A, from the sentence flowing left to right we have an “L” shaped “CANOE”. And it is interesting that the word “canoe” appears right where the poem says “take it in the canyon down”. Could “canoe” be something we take in the canyon down? What do you think? Is it purely coincidental, or is it a hint? It certainly left me wondering.

In another “Featured Question with Forrest”, called ‘Early Morning Ideas” (October23, 2014), someone named “Thrill” asks a question of Forrest to which he replies: “Especially burned into my memory Thrill, was the idea to arrange a cultural exchange program with the Russian Government. A few art scholars jazzed me pretty good and I was the butt of some funny jokes, because it was 1975 and the Cold War was in full blast.

Again, when I read this I immediately thought of the poem and something I had seen in it. Because not only had I looked for acrostics, I had experimented in other ways also, such as typing the poems sentences with no spaces between the words. One sentence in particular caused me to laugh, as crude as the humor was, because the words “butt” and “fart” were in the same sentence.

“NOTFARBUTTOFARTOWALK”

Again, as crude as this is it does appear to match the story’s words of “butt” and “full blast”. As I laughed under my breath I remembered another possible explanation which used another “L” shaped acrostic, this time appearing on exactly the 12th letter from the left combined with a word in a sentence flowing from left to right.  This time also the word read upwards and to the right.

  12th letter from left

NOTFARBUTTOOFARTOWALK

PUTINBELOWTHEHOMEOFBROWN

 FROMTHEREITSNOPLACEFORTHEMEEK

The S-H-O is exactly 12 letters from the left—again very intriguing.  But why “Shofar” you ask? Well, first, if you read the answer from Forrest above he says that the art scholars “jazzed” him. When I think of jazz I think of horns.  Incidentally, in the first stanza of the poem are two different acrostics which both spell HORN.  And here, with the word “shofar” is another HORN.

If you google the word Shofar you will see it defined as having a “blasting” sound. They use the word frequently when describing the shofar with long “blasts” or short “blasts”. In Forrest’s answer he states that the Cold War was in FULL BLAST, which is an interesting choice of words. Another interesting thing about the sentence itself is the fact that Forrest said that he was the “butt” of Art Scholars jokes.

NORFARBUTTOOF ARTOWALK  The sentence seems to confirm this.

Now, I realize some of you may be calling me “nuts” by now or deluded, and actually that’s fine with me. I realize that stating that “full blast” may refer to a shofar or a fart is a bit silly, but the placing of the words in the poem seems to be a bit more than coincidence in my opinion.  What do you think?  The shape of the acrostic as an “L” for both CANOE and SHOFAR on the exact letters that they fall on is quite interesting to say the least.  But then again, above in the sentences we can see the words FORT BROWN quite clearly too. I thought this might be a hint, but Forrest has since stated that HOB is not a man-made structure. Fort Washakie in Wyoming was called Fort Brown first. So it is obvious that coincidences can happen.

One other interesting acrostic found in the poem is the word GAIT (“Gone Alone In There”). This word has been hinted at many times by Forrest. Even in SB146, when he mentions the duck named ‘Tail End Charlie”, he states that it was born with a strange “gait”. Near the very end of the poem there is another acrostic, BAIT (Brave And In The wood). I had noticed these two acrostics right away as I read the poem, along with WAFT (Wise And Found The blaze) and the two examples of HORN in the first stanza also. However, I did also realize that these acrostics, being only (4) letters long per word, could easily have happened by chance also. But the more I read the more I felt that at least GAIT was a real hint.

One thing that confirmed this a bit for me was another exchange in a question/answer between Forrest and Carolyn. This is found in another “Featured Question with Forrest” titled “Inside Indulgence” dated 12-14-14.  Carolyn asks: “Are there any bronze animals in the chest, indulgence, or anything bronze?” To which Forrest answers: “Nothing bronze at all Carolyn, or even silver. I wanted more expensive metals in Indulgence. That’s why I chose gold. There is a gold frog that’s very old”.

I found the question and the answer both to be very odd. Forrest is asks whether there are any bronze animals in the chest?  Why bronze animals? Why? It just appeared to be a strange question.  And then Forrest answers with a couple of strange replies also.  He states there is nothing bronze in the chest, or silver also. But we all know that Forrest wants the SILVER BRACELET back if anyone finds the chest. So why does he say there is nothing silver in it?  Then he ends his answer with: “There is a gold frog that’s very old”. What I noticed is that the question and answer both begin and end with same acrostics that are in the poem—except they are reversed:

Are there any Bronze Animals In The chest  (BAIT)

There Is A Gold frog…” (TIAG = GAIT)

Again, this may be entirely coincidental. But the number of hints I have seen mentioned regarding the word “gait” leads me to believe otherwise. Because the poem begins and ends with these acrostics, is Forrest purposefully beginning and ending the question/answer with these two acrostics to hint to us that they are important?  I really have no idea. I am just fishing, and getting “nibbles”. I haven’t really caught any fish. By that I am basically saying that I see these things, but don’t really know how to apply them in order to get the big fish.

I might add though: In a recent post on Dal’s blog a gentleman mentioned a game he put together for his wife. He hid envelopes around the house for her to find. He actually went into quite some detail—and even added a bit more after Forrest responded to him

However, Forrest gave only this short reply: “That Is A Good story.f’  (TIAG = GAIT). He added nothing more.

Of course there are many coincidental things that we can find in the poem. Here are a couple of examples. In the past someone shared how they believed the sub-conscious mind might have something to do with the poem. They mentioned ID and EGO. Naturally I had to check it out, and here is what I found almost immediately (lol):

As I havegone alone in there

AnD with my treasures bold

And another person mentioned an esoteric meaning being part of the solution. They mentioned TAROT cards—especially the WANDS cards.  Surprisingly, if you arrange the poem in an up and down manner the following appears  and there are many other coincidental things that appear just like this. Or are they coincidental?

HBHDHDW

TSWNSNO

NETAROT

 IREWEYR

It’s kind of strange how WAND appears all on 4 letters in from the left. Just coincidence I guess.

END OF PART 1.

-Sparrow

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Spawning a Solution……

SUBMITTED NOVEMBER 2017
by The Geezer Team

 

We (the Geezer Team) believe that the best way to find the treasure is to take Forrest Fenn’s poem at face value and temper that with information provided by Fenn since the poem’s publication. Our approach will also include establishing segments such as A-B wherein A is WWWH and B is the HOB, the HOB and the blaze make up segment B-C, and the blaze and the treasure is segment C-D. We don’t know if our approach is any bettter than other approaches, we just like it.

The first stanza, we believe, is an introduction wherein Fenn is telling us the treasure is hidden in some kind of rock shelter at least as big as himself plus the treasure box, “As I have gone alone in there,”. We’re guessing to get in there, he may have walked in upright, stuped, crawled, or wiggled in. He is also telling us that knowledge of the hiding spot is his alone and safe. Fenn said when he decided to hide a treasure he knew exactly where to do it but how would he know about such a location? We believe it was discovered during approximately 12 summer trips to and from Yellowstone when he was a youth. If you study a highway map from the 1930s you’ll see a major route from Texas to Denver. That route passes right along three of the four major river systems for that part of the Rockies. The three river systems are the Rio Grande, the Arkansas, and the Platte. (Fenn has ruled out the Rio Grande, however). On those long trips away from and back to their Texas home, we believe the Fenn family stopped along the rivers to rest, to camp over night, and to fish for trout. And, there was probably enough leisure time for two exuberant boys to explore, discover, collect artifacts, etc.

In the second stanza, we got started right away on segment A-B. We believe that “Begin it where warm waters halt” is a tributary water way, which flows into a river, and that we have found that tributary. Finding A, of course, is the key to the whole enchilada. The tributary has numerous hot springs making it a warm water source. Then we have: “And take it in the canyon down,” which means the searcher is in a water craft of some kind (canoe, kayak, raft) going with the current and into a canyon. We believe the use of a water craft is confirmed by “put in” (2nd stanza, 4th line) which is a nautical term meaning to land, esp. put in to a port. Alternatively, a 4-wheel drive vehicle with high clearance might be able to be used when this river’s water is low, typically, early spring and late autum. But we don’t know if that’s legal. Now, what about “Not far, but too far to walk.”? How can a destination be both “not far” but also “too far” at the same time? Since the searcher has to go down through a canyon he/she might think why not just walk up on top the river bank. We believe Fenn is telling us (and we observed) that the canyon has sides that are riddled with deep gulches making that kind of endeavour a long hike – up and down, up and down, up and down, etc. thus adding many more miles, and tough ones at that.

“Put in below the home of Brown.” tells us where to stop, where to “Put in”, thus determining segment A-B. It seems like there are two ways to interpret “… home of Brown.”, both require Brown to be capitalized, but for different reasons. The first is that Brown is a proper name wherein the searcher must find a person, place or thing named Brown along the river, in the river, or on top of a bank overlooking the river, etc. We call this the “proper name” scenario The second interpretation is that Brown refers to an animal species; e.g., Brown Bear, Brown Trout. I can hear many folks screaming right now; ” … but, but, but, but the rules of capitalzation …”! And, early on in our quest, we would have been screaming right along with you. However, the capitalization of common species names is now becoming a regular practice. But, this is also a special case allowing Brown to be capitalized to distinguish a common species name from a feature like color. For example, we are saying these are not just trout that are colored brown but are a species with many distiguishing features. We call this the “Brown Trout” scenario, which we will pursue if the “proper name” scenario does not produce the treasure. More discussion on this later.

In searching for point B of segement A-B, we actually found a location with an interesting proper name. The proper name we found is Brownsville! But don’t try to find it on a map because it hasn’t existed for a long time. The town of Brownsville was a ghost town when the Fenn’s visited the area and there is now a different name for that location! That Fenn sure is a sly old fox, but don’t try to baffle the old Geezer Team, buddy boy! Actually, we stumbled into that information, serendipitiously, and went to the old Brownsville cemetary but couldn’t find “any body” named Brown (ha, ha, ha). We discovered later that the Brown in question is in a different cemetary. The old Brownsville town wasn’t quite on the river, but the slope of the land from the town down to the river canyon was sufficient for us to believe that that part of the river is “below the home of Brown.” Further, if a searcher “puts in” on the opposite river bank there is a gulch that kind of fits the next part of the poem.

For segment B-C, Fenn cautions that the going will be tough (“From there it’s no place for the meek,”) and searchers will be in a non-navigable creek (“there’ll be no paddle up your creek,”). We are puzzled, however, by the words “your creek”, why not just say “the creek”. One reason we could think of was that maybe we should be looking for a creek with a name like “Treasure Creek” or “Gold Creek” or “Searchers Creek”, etc. But there are no creeks with names that fit that category in our search area. We are more puzzled by the next line, however: “Just heavy loads and water high.”! Some searchers say the heavy loads could be big boulders and rocks but I hope no one is trying to carry them around! Some searchers say the heavy loads are the treasure box contents, but it hasn’t been found yet since we’re following the poem sequently, as Fenn suggests. Does “water high” mean there’s water further up the gulch, does it mean the water found will be deep, or is it a water feature like a water fall? We know for a fact that this gulch has a wet lands seven miles up from the river and has some small springs along the way but for the most part the gulch is seasonal – intermittent wet and dry. Like a tree that’s been cut down, we’re stumped, so we will move on to the next stanza.

Discovering point C requires finding the blaze, a major element to finding the treasure. Fenn offers little help in the poem simply saying “If you’ve been wise and found the blaze,” which tells us nothing because we already know that the Geezer Team is wise! He has told us, however, that the treasure is not in close proximity to a human trail and that searchers have been within 500 feet! So at .5 miles we got out of the gulch and went 500 feet left and right. Some searchers believe “nigh” means left, so why not just do the left side? Well, we’re having a hard time finding that definition. No matter, if you go one side and don’t find the treasure, you’ll be wise and go on the other side, or go home empty handed. But, when a searcher leaves the gulch what should he/she be looking for as a location? Look for a place that satisfies Fenn’s sensory experience as if he were standing near the treasure hiding spot. Fenn wants to able to see his beloved Rocky Mountains, a river valley, the river, pine trees, and indiginous animals (deer, elk, prong horn, big horn sheep). He wants to smell sage brush, pines, and most of all Pinon Pine, especially when the sap runs thick! To date, we have searched an area approximately .5 mile from the river and 1 mile up, on both sides of the gulch, with no results. Winter is coming on so we will wait until spring 2018 to do the next mile up.

Since the blaze must last 10,000 plus years it can’t be a tree notch, a carving, a cairn, or any thing like that. It can’t rot, rust, or be prone to erosion or being moved in any way. So we are left with something like a natural rock formation or discoloration. But we don’t buy that either. As mentined earlier, Fenn said he knew exactly where to hide the treasure. It is highly improbable, though, that a natural blaze would be in exactly the right place too. We’re guessing that the blaze is something he made, brought in and placed himself. Something meaningful to show the way. Something like, like … Well, figure it out yourself, we can’t have all the fun. The meaning of “If you’ve been wise and found the blaze.” is that since the blaze is man-made, you will know it when you see it, else you are not wise! So now we have a way ahead for segment B-C.

Segment C-D is from the blaze to the treasure and Fenn gives searchers instructions. He says “Look quickly down, your quest to cease.” We believe he means, when a searcher sees the blaze, stop! Moving forward toward the blaze (a natural tendency) will put the searcher out of position to see the chest! Looking down has several interpretations such as look down at your feet, or look south, or look down the trail, or if the blaze is high, just bring your gaze down. We believe it doesn’t matter at this point. When we find the blaze we’ll try anything and everything to find the treasure, even bring in bull dozers, back hoes, construction cranes, jack hammers, etc.!

In the final stanza first line, Fenn urges searchers to listen up with: “So hear me all and listen good,” then: “Your effort will be worth the cold.” and “If you are brave and in the wood”. We believe that the “cold” means that the hiding place is on the north side of some feature, a cliff, rock out-cropping, boulder pile, etc., where the sun never shines. And/or the river and creek waters are always cold! The last sentence of the poem is puzzling. Why does one have to be brave, unless its just a general trait expected of searchers? For “in the wood” we’re guessing Fenn means in the chest, which is lined with Lebanon cedar! For the rest of that sentence and the last line of the poem, “I give you title to the gold.” Fenn has gone weird on us. If we have the chest and its contents we don’t need title from him or anyone else. Unless, unless, … unless all the intended treasure is not in the chest and we have to collect the rest from him or his estate!

A bit about the “Broun Trout” scenario, which we believe is actually a “Brown Trout spawning” scenario. First we have to find a new WWWH for segment A-B, either on this river or another. Next we go down a canyon as before but this time we’re looking for a Brown Trout spawning tributary to begin segment B-C. Once we find the tributary, we are “… below the home of Brown.” and can head up that creek and then explore 500 feet on either side to find the blaze. The phrase “… no place for the meek.” now takes on a new meaning as it refers to the trout swimming up stream to spawn! Females carry approximately 10,000 – 20,000 eggs (Just heavy loads …) which are laid and fertilized in the autum but don’t hatch until the spring when the waters start warming up. The hatch becomes thosands of fry and those that survive become fingerlings which stay in the creek at least a year. Thus, although still non-navigable, the creek must have water all year and be deep enough for spawning (… water high.).

We imagined spawning to go something like this: After swimming up stream, a male trout approaches a female and she says “Wow, you look buff, what’s up big boy!” He says “Yeah, been working out for the spawn. I’m wondering if you’d be interested in a little romance?.” ”I am! I just laid a few thousand eggs over by those rocks in a nest I made. Go knock yourself out, then come back for a cigy-pooh! (Jack Kerouac beatnik slang for cigarette). After which I’ll cover the fertilized eggs with sand and gravel, then we’ll get back to the river. You won’t tell any body about this, will you? I mean, we just met and now we’re having all these kids! A girl has to worry about her reputation.” “Nah, what happens in this creek, stays in this creek.”

The Geezer Team-

The Poem as Nine Sentences……

SUBMITTED OCTOBER 2017
by Bowmarc

 

 

I am sure that this theory or process has been brought to light before; none-the-less, I am putting it out there with my own insight and reasoning.

This entire post is IMO and I will endeavor to back up any FF quotes, assertions, etc. where/when possible.

As the title line states, I will be breaking FF’s poem down into 9 sentences based solely upon the punctuation that FF himself has provided us with.

That being said, this is how the poem looks as 9 sentences:

As I have gone alone in there and with my treasures bold, I can keep it where, and hint of riches new and old.

Begin it where warm waters halt, and take it in the canyon down, not far, but too far to walk.

Put in below the home of Brown.

From there it’s no place for the meek, the end is ever drawing nigh; there’ll be no paddle up your creek, just heavy loads and water high.

If you’ve been wise and found the blaze, look quickly down, your quest to cease but tarry scant with marvel gaze, just take the chest and go in peace.

So why is it that I must go and leave my trove for all to seek?

The answers I already know I’ve done it tired and now I am weak.

So listen all and hear me good, your effort will be worth the cold.

If you are brave and in the wood I give you title to the gold.

*I must add that with the exception of the word “Brown”, which FF himself capitalized in his poem, I have only capitalized the first word in each of the sentences derived from FF’s poem.

For those who are new to TTOTC, I will be using abbreviations and terms that have evolved within this treasure hunting community (and, in hindsight, I have already used some above) and will attempt to define those for you below or when such are first used within my post. This list is not exhaustive and so far includes the following:

FF = Forrest Fenn (the master wordsmith who has set us all to the task of finding his hidden treasure)

TTOTC = The Thrill of the Chase (a book by FF in which he includes an untitled poem which leads to a treasure he hid somewhere) (Also the “feelings” which we searches experience while looking for the treasure)

Indulgence = the name given to the treasure hidden by FF

BOTG = Boots on the Ground (the act of physically going to a location and actively searching for Indulgence)

Stanza = a group of lines forming the basic recurring metrical unit in a poem (FF’s poem is said to have 6 stanzas consisting of 4 lines per stanza)

IMO = In My Opinion

ATF = Unknown to this writer so including it more as a question (I think it means After the Fact)

Sometimes as I am breaking down FF’s poem, I will be referencing lines in his stanzas by capitalizing the first letter of each word in said line. For example, if the line I am about to reference/dissect reads “begin it where warm waters halt” I will refer to it as BIWWWH, and further refer to subsections by similar means (for example, WWWH is simply Where Warm Waters Halt, a subsection of the line currently being discussed).

I have primarily used the 1828 online version of Webster’s Dictionary to identify each word’s part of speech and associated definition, as well as other various internet dictionaries to further identify and define words as needed (for example, some words were not defined in the 1828 version so I had to look elsewhere). I have not further researched word origins and/or translated them to/from any other language as to do such may be, IMO, going against the spirit of FF’s quote that “…Knowing about head pressures, foot pounds, …” (Tarry Scant website ID# 2775) et al. Also, to do such is an undertaking I am not yet prepared to embark upon at this time as my current work (this document) consumes a lot of my time & mental resources. 🙂

At the end of each breakdown I will have a TRANSLATION from “Fenn-ese” (Fenn-ese = The written and/or expressed word or words as used and understood by Forrest Fenn) to “Bowmarc-ese” (Bowmarc-ese = Bowmarc’s interpretation(s) of Fenn-ese). 🙂

Before I begin, I wanted to state that I am not an English professor, and confess that the subject was one I was loath to conform to (perhaps much like FF?) and one of my worst subjects throughout my entire educational endeavors. That being said, my use of grammar, punctuation, spelling, terminology, etc. are just to the best of my ability and understanding and not intended to flaunt my education level (or lack thereof) and are intended to convey meaning, provide food for thought, articulate a point, beat a dead horse, etc. and not intended as a platform to belittle or talk down to anyone and I hereby apologize to anyone who takes offense to anything I have written and/or to how it is written. In other words, I am just trying to be thorough, logical, etc. and apologize if any reader takes offense for how I am doing so.

With all that being said, here goes:

Sentence #1 is “As I have gone alone in there and with my treasures bold, I can keep it where, and hint of riches new and old.” = All hints and an opening statement about what is being done and what must be done. FF has to provide his reader with an introduction to his poem as well as giving his reader some information regarding the poem’s purpose, which sentence #1 does.

As = an adverb meaning that or while.

I = a pronoun for myself. NOTES: marks a distinction between the speaker (or writer in this case) and another person

Have = transitive verb meaning to possess/Marry/regard/maintain (maintain meaning affirm). NOTES: is this the past tense and does that really matter?

Gone = passive participle meaning departed/advanced/ruined; (abstractly) departed from life. NOTES: As FF is currently not deceased, I don’t feel the abstract definition is applicable.

Alone = adjective meaning single/without company/only NOTES: FF as affirmed on several occasions that he was by himself when he hid the treasure and that he is the only one who knows where it is hidden so I won’t reference a specific quote at this time, but perhaps a little ATF. 🙂

In = preposition meaning surrounded by limits.

There = adverb meaning in that place/thither/to that point or ends.

And = conjunction meaning further.

With = preposition meaning in connection.

My = pronoun and/or adjective meaning belonging to me.

Treasures = noun meaning wealth accumulated/particularly a stock or store of money in reserve/a great quantity of anything collected for future use; transitive verb meaning to hoard/collect/reposit. NOTES: an “s” is added to either make plural nouns or to form the 3rd person singular of the present simple tense (I work, you work, he works)—treasures, IMO, is not a 3rd person singular therefore the noun definition/usage is more favorable than the transitive verb definition/usage, therefore the “s” makes the noun treasure plural.

Bold = adjective meaning forward/prominent/daring/executed with spirit/without fear; transitive verb meaning to make daring. NOTES: the transitive verb definition is archaic. As an adjective we need to determine what noun bold is referring to—since there is a conjunction (and) earlier in this sentence, everything before the “and” is a separate clause from everything after the “and”, therefore bold has to refer to something in the second clause, leaving treasures as the subject of the adjective bold. (*However, see translation #2 later on)

, (Comma) = punctuation mark that indicates a pause in a sentence, denotes a slight break between different parts of a sentence, or separates items in a list. Used properly, commas make the meaning of a sentence clear by grouping and separating words, phrases, and clauses.

I = pronoun meaning myself.

Can = noun meaning cup or vessel; transitive verb meaning to be able to / to have means. NOTES: pretty sure it is not meaning a cup or vessel.

Keep = transitive verb meaning to hold / to have in custody for security / to preserve (from falling or damage) / to tend / to maintain

My = pronoun and/or adjective meaning belonging to me.

Secret = an adjective meaning properly, separate, hence hid/concealed from notice or knowledge of all persons except the individual(s) concerned/removed from sight/not proper, hence ought to be kept from observation; a noun meaning something studiously concealed/a mystery; a verb meaning to keep private. NOTES: KMSW could mean I, FF, am going to keep my private place to myself (more loosely “translated” FF is saying I can keep my secret place secret)(While I dislike defining a word/phrase using a word that is to be defined, I feel “I can keep my secret place secret” translates FF’s line fairly well and may be the first time I have translated said line thusly and/or read of it being translated thusly). In other words, “secret where” is a thing (his secret someplace), not a reference to the treasure being someplace. In more other words, the line can be read “I can keep my secret where.” as in I have the resolve to not reveal my private spot under any circumstances (well, except I can and did hint of it).

Where = an adverb meaning at which place or places/whither (whither = absolutely/to what point or degree); a pronoun meaning what place/the place in which; a noun meaning a place.

, (Comma) = punctuation mark that indicates a pause in a sentence, denotes a slight break between different parts of a sentence, or separates items in a list. Used properly, commas make the meaning of a sentence clear by grouping and separating words, phrases, and clauses.

And = conjunction meaning further.

Hint = a transitive verb meaning to bring to mind by slight mention or remote allusion/to allude to; intransitive verb meaning to mention slightly; a noun meaning a word or two intended to give notice, or remind one of something without a full declaration or explanation.

Of = a preposition meaning proceeding from (proceeding = participle present tense meaning moving forward/passing on/issuing/transacting/carrying on).

Riches = a noun meaning wealth/possession of land, good, or money in abundance/a splendid, sumptuous appearance; a plural noun meaning abundant and valuable possessions

New = adjective meaning lately made/modern, not ancient; not familiar with

And = conjunction meaning further.

Old = adjective meaning having been long made/ancient; in vulgar language, crafty or cunning

. (Period) = punctuation mark indication a full stop/expresses the finality of what is being said (written).

TRANSLATION 1 = While I (FF) affirm that I once departed into a place with limits in no one’s company but indeed with a prominent collection of items of value belonging to me, I myself am able to maintain private knowledge of a place known as such to me, while also (herein) being able to make slight mention of an abundance of valuable possessions that are lately made or ancient.

NOTES REGARDING TRANSLATION 1 = FF has been quoted as responding to a question about the rules of capitalization being properly followed in his poem with “Whose Rules, ChicagoDave?” (Tarry Scant website ID #3216) so one may also assume that the proper rules of punctuation, etc. are equally questioned by FF in whole or in part. That being said, and for that reason, I give you Translation #2 below.

TRANSLATION 2 = While I (FF) affirm that I once departed with strength of resolve and purpose into a place with limits in no one’s company but indeed with a prominent collection of items of value belonging to me, I myself am able to maintain private knowledge of a place known as such to me, while also (herein) being able to make slight mention of an abundance of valuable possessions that are lately made or ancient.

NOTES REGARDING TRANSLATION 2 = In this version I allude to FF possibly using bold to refer back to himself in the clause before the “and” as well as, in the interest of space, also still alluding to the treasure as bold (prominent). A lot of chatter online about double meanings and this is an example of such (albeit obscurely) i.e. using the word bold to describe himself and the treasure with one usage of the word.

That’s about the end of my current line of thinking regarding line one of FF’s poem when such is broken down into 9 sentences. My plans are to post my thoughts on each of the 9 sentences at a pace of about 1 sentence a week, give or take a few days. I am well into completing my take on BIWWWH so it may be forthcoming sooner than later.

Thanks for reading and commenting.

-Bowmarc

Among the Weeds & Roots…

SUBMITTED OCTOBER 2017
by OS2

 

Caution, I don’t doggedly follow the poem’s path so much as I immerse myself in a holistic pool of its words and images.  Paths come later, for those with boots. 
There are several possible WWWHs and HOBs which can be placed as needed, but they’re back at camp and I’m headed for a named trail now. Come along and see it bold.
Its not a loop trail, it has two trailheads.  If you use Rene’s scheme, imagine the two intersecting roads on the map as pole -X and floor-Y.   Attach one TH to each and voila!, you’ve got a brave triangular loop.  (Brave means tall)   Ever hear of an ancient named, Hero of Alexandria?  Bright guy. Studied waterwheels & pneumatics.  Worked them cold. Zero. No predecessors.  He devised a neat measure for triangle areas using only perimeters.   Yeh, no height needed!   We called him ‘No pole Leon’.    … thanks for laughing. 
More recently, another old man took his own measure on this very trail.   Told me he laughed when he got back to his car just because he’d done it!   I’m guessing what he really laughed at were some memorable experiences that he won’t tell, and maybe a 13 year old’s name for this place.   Silent P’s & G’s  are kind of funny.
There’s a few creeks up here, fordable but be careful, a wrong step and quick slip will chill your nips. The great glory of this place is in Mom’s long-sightedness over her fields of wild flowers. Sometimes I come just to watch summer’s sun pillow down in them at end of day.
Its a great place to take your girl.  Maybe blaze a stone or tree with a heart and a pair of initials for her.   Who knows?  Years later, sitting under an osprey on the Madison, you might remember it to her with a note.  Here’s a hint, if your girl’s too meek to bait a hook, Cougar Creek is a clever boy’s chance to put an arm around her.  City boys have to rely on horror films in darkened theaters for those opportunities.  That’s a heavy load.
This creek here quits soon, but a little Duck will paddle it down to the setting sun … ain’t that Rich?  Oh come on, look at your map and laugh at that.  I’m no linguist, but a nearby bell peals off too.  Google ‘bells peals’ please.   Now see that dandy Sandy Butte over there?   Its just the cup to hide a young lady’s face or for what boys are oft attributed to.   (A cup is a small hill.)
So now that you’re wise to the Gneiss Trail, have fun imagining on Yellowstone’s Sunset-strip.  Go in peace Traveler.
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Well , those are the short highlights, if that’s not a contradiction.  The must-have 9’s are too complex for writing out, but they’re here if you’re dyslexic & good looking.  
My first trigger was “Listen Good” which has nothing to do with that “Hear ye all” toll.  A LIST is a line, a strip, a stripe, an edge, a border or perimeter.  FF puts his rules ON a list.  To tailors, the list is the selvage of a bolt of fabric.  (I’ve heard it called a bold of fabric, but I think that was colloquial.)   If you’re an environmentalist more that most, you’ll know the RED LIST of endangered species.  DO NOT TOUCH them.  A jouster’s shield or kings crest may be encircled or sectioned by lists.  Sometimes a ribbony one arches across a scant announcing some profound literary nonsense in Latin, or just a cold R.I.P. Charlie Brown. 
Trailhead #1 is at 7 Mile Bridge.   My NatGo map shows Cougar Patrol Cabin above it, but I don’t find it on GE. 
If you’re sliding down the north pole,  Grayling Creek might be your threshold moment.  (Stout Hearts were in Texas, but the photo said Grayling.)  From there, TH #2 is nigh, look quickly down for a grove of aspens.  For some, it’s a permanent put-in, but the parking’s good.  Nice pics  of it on Find-a-Grave Fir Ridge.
OS2-