Up Near Hebgen Lake…

SUBMITTED JULY 2017
by Brandon

 

Let me start with the fact that I have never been to Yellowstone.  Although I live in Colorado, which is beautiful and has numerous lakes, rivers and amazing scenery, I was blown away at the majestic mountains and landscape that Yellowstone and the surrounding areas have to offer.  We arrived in Island Park, ID on Monday.  We had a cabin that was 30 minutes to the west entrance and I couldn’t wait to get started.  I had a couple of locations that I wanted to search and they both followed the same first few clues, from there is where I was split on what to do next.  I am not gonna pull all the exact quotes and exactly which videos I got my information from cause I don’t have the time, but I’m sure all the bloggers can check for me, so for now, I’ll stick to paraphrasing.

Begin it where warm waters halt.  Forrest what does warm mean to you?  Forrest replies “Comfortable”  What waters is Forrest most comfortable in? Fly water of course.  Which fly water, the fly waters of Yellowstone.  The Firehole, Gibbon and Madison rivers are designated flywaters only.  And where do they halt? The Yellowstone boundary line at Bakers Hole on the Madison, which all flow in one direction out of the park.  Speaking of Bakers Hole, IMO Forrest’s comments about making a cake or whatever and leaving out a few ingredients, would you achieve your goal?  Wouldn’t that be just like Forrest to be hinting about Bakers Hole?

And take it in the canyon down.  To me this meant the canyon that actually did come down.  The Madison River Canyon.  The earthquake in 1959 brought part of that canyon down, forming quake lake.

Not far, but too far to walk.  From Bakers Hole to the put in below the home of Brown is too far to walk and this simply means to drive there.

Put in below the home of Brown.  This is where I have two theory’s as to the put in, but my home of Brown is Hebgen Lake.

Forrest makes the comment that your destination is small but its location is huge.  Well in TTOTC Forrest describes Hebgen lake as huge.  My 1st theory for the put in is the boat ramp at quake lake is actually the old highway that is now submerged under quake lake.  My 2nd theory is just below Hebgen dam,

which is the 1st place you are allowed to put in with a raft, although you cannot fish from your boat in this section, just put in. Forrest says in one interview that he did not want to discuss when he found his special place because it would give too much away.  I always believed he said that because if he said 1962 or sometime similar it would let you know the earthquake of 1959 which reshaped some of the land there, had something to do with the solve.  Why not just say he found it when he was a kid or teenager?

theory 2
From there its no place for the meek.

below the dam are all kinds of warning signs.  One theory I never got to execute is this clue meaning to cross the street.  If you google the definition of meek, one of the synonyms for meek is biddable.  No place for biddies.  That whole chapter is about those biddies saying he couldn’t cross the street and he thought he could cross the street whenever he wanted too.  What do you think?

The end is ever drawing nigh.  As you put in below hebgen dam and head upstream, you are on the left and its not far in distance to walk up.

There’ll be no paddle up your creek.  Below the dam is definitely something you cannot paddle up.

Just heavy loads and water high.  Sure sounds like a dam to me.  Forrest said warm waters halt is not a dam.  He did not say Heavy loads and water high isn’t.  Which I also thought went perfectly with why your below the home of Brown.

If you’ve been wise and found the blaze

This was my blaze.  Its something permanent that would not be feasible to remove.

Well I looked quickly down and around and all over the place but did not find the treasure.  Although I did find many great memories with my family.

Back to theory 1,

Once I was standing at the boat ramp, which is the old highway and got to:
From there its no place for the meek,
the end is ever drawing nigh;
there’ll be no paddle up your creek,
just heavy loads and water high.

I thought this was referring to Beaver Creek, which enters the Madison right at the beginning of Quake Lake.  Hence the semicolon connecting the two.  In one of the videos, I think its the logging video, Forrest talks about pulling a lodgepole pine behind a 10 horsepower motor and says, “now that was a heavy load.”  So in this theory my heavy loads and water high was all the trees in the Madison and Quake lake where it forms.

Well I hiked all around that area and up Beaver creek, but didn’t find anything.  Again we had a great time and will definitely visit the area again.  But for now, back to square one.

I hope someone will maybe continue with something I missed.  Once you are physically there you realize how this thing could be anywhere.  Its a huge area.  Please feel free to leave your comments.  I wanted to attach the pictures as my story went along but am not much of a computer guy.  I tried subscribing to your site and just got too confused on how to post this there, so I thought I would email it to you.  Thank you Forrest, Dal and everyone else who contributes to this blog.

Brandon-