Pike’s Stockade…

November, 2018

By Amanda

 

This solve is mostly on private property so you will have to get permission from the owners to go in there. And that doesn’t mean they will let you. To do that you will have to either knock on some doors to figure out who the owner is or go to the assessor’s office.  I have only driven by and stopped on the county road stayed in my car to get my bearings but I do not suggest doing that. It is a good solve to look at in Google earth.

 

As I have (sieve) gone alone (lone, one) in there (hare-rabbit)
And (end) with my treasures (miter) bold (bowled),
I can keep (keap) my secret (seek ret) where (hare, weir),
And hint (indent) of riches new and (wand) old.

Begin it (ginnett ) where (weir or hare) warm waters halt (military term for rest)
And take (tack it like a sail boat) it in the canyon down,
Not far, but too (24) far to walk.
Put in below (be low) the home (ohm) of Brown (round).

From there it’s (rets) no place for the meek (meeke), (lacet?)
The end is ever (sever) drawing (a draw) nigh (nye);   
There’ll be (reel) no paddle (pattle) up your creek (the act of walking in shallow water),

Just heavy (juiste) (V) loads and (sand) water high.

 If you’ve been (bean) wise (wisen) and found the blaze (Z) (belays, Belize),
Look (loke) quickly down, your quest (stow, west?) to cease (cees),
But tarry (ute ) scant (secant) with marvel gaze (gaize) (V),

Just take (stake or tack) the chest and (stand) go in peace

So (sow soe) why (Y) is it that I (tie) must go (geo)
And leave (levee) my trove (rove) for all to seek (secant?)
The answers I (eye) already (reedy or red) know,
I’ve done it tired (tiered, tied or red)(McIntyre springs), and now I’m weak ( weck) and barely visible).

So (sow, soe) hear me (heme or army arm, mall) all and (land) listen (list) good (goode),
Your effort (reef)(fort)will be worth (bow or earth) the cold (cole or col).
If you (hue) are brave and (ravine) in the (dent)(hue) wood (woad)
I give you (ute) title (tittle) to the gold (geo, heg or toggle).

 Look on a map and you will see the following NEAR the fort (Pikes Stockade)( army) at 24 and Y (24 too far to walk) roads 24 south as it veers left and ends (a loke OR THE END). The Conejos river (meaning rabbit) meandering river and all the agriculture associated with the valley such as growing the grain for Coors beer (wizen).  Growing beans cabbage (cole) with cows and steak.  Cutting hay. Also a lot of tarry scant (grease wood).  In winter you want to be n the other side so you don’t have to cross the freezing river. Follow road V out of Sandford CO go left on W it is a paved one lane road.  You will see saddleback mt and once you cross the Conjeos River look to the left.  The Sierro del Ojioto just a small hill is not impressive as it is no more than a sand pit (geo, white gaize) that is the blaze as it gazes up with it’s eyes about the size of small swimming pool with another weird looking eye.  You can see it from the road.  There are no trespassing signs everywhere so you have to ask the owner.(Google map view not in satellite mode) you will see 2 large Cs looks a lot like the omegas but only in map mode. One is in the circle of irrigation crops. I drove by several times and thought what a yucky place but to each his own.

WWWH is the warm spring at McIntire Springs where it goes into the cold Conjeos river an archeology dig at near sierra del ojito (small hill) yielded several things including writing (tarry scant)(see link at bottom of page)  so the hill is the home of the Brown the Ute many arrowheads also were found hence all the references to arrows in the poem. Pikes Stockade contained a pvt. john brown and sgt meek was one of his pikes men (don’t know if meek made it over there though. Near Sanford (sand) near sierra del ojito (eyes and dents sand) near saddleback mt (col – the lowest point of a ridge or saddle) near Lassuas meaning reedy N of V road.

  1. Solve 1. Sierro del Ojito This is private property so I assume either the first house or the one further back are the owners I do not know.  So again ask first. Should be in the irrigation ditch (you have to go in there put yourself in)directly below the white eye aka the blaze behind the trailer house and before the river to the north (just a round pile of sand) oyos you can see it in map quest it is in the shape of a V.  A newer ditch than the others. I am thinking it is at the corner where it changes direction in a mitre 90 degrees the corner but anywhere along that ditch might have to follow it back toward the spring or the other way.  It looks like other ditches are around too so it may be in one of the other ones too. If its in one of the older ditches I would think it would be closer to the sand pit. It should be barely visible however it has been several years so if one has a metal detector you could go faster. I assume there is a little water in the big v shaped ditch but maybe not during the winter. I don’t know if it involves a rope and spike but fyi in case I may be off on that . If you go in summer many rattlesnakes beware no place for the meek. Also means you can’t plow there. 
  1. Solve 2. Start at the end of 24 road by pikes stockade. Will have to cross the river (walk barefoot through shallow water) unless you start on the other side if its winter North of Saddleback Mt in There is a small dam (weir or levee) in the shape of a V.  Cross the river. There is a large irrigation reel tiered (water high and heavy loads with a generator )(ret-watering). Irrigation makes a loud sound (hear me).could be described as a Secant with a wand, there should be a small ravine a draw, a geo with red hew tint probably oxidized metal ore–the (heme iron stained reef or metallic looking if not red) blaze near some trees perhaps a dry stream where the treasure will be barely visible. Might be some muddy water near might be in a dent. Possibly a generator or electric near supplying the irrigation or near where the water source.  Might mean belays or stakes tied to something. Might find the treasure right in there.
  1. Solve 3. Might be in the warm spring (soe a warm bucket also means warm, rope) or a bucket like thing like a well or a trough or a bucket under a windmill. Very near one of the arms..Look for tin, lid, projecting part of something, toggle a stake, a tine, stand or rope. A soe might be in McIntyre spring There is one tree near the spring and a dam. Lots of white rock around

I initially thought that the whole san luis valley was wwwh as it is a closed basin and mt Blanca was the blaze as you can see it from the whole valley.

Tittle-small part of something or the dot above a j or i. or teat as in bird or nib-small pointed projecting part

Rove-meander or a sliver of cotton fiber drawn out (rope?) and slightly twisted for preparing to spin or a small metal place or ring or Rove-archery term

Marble gaize-white rock

Geo-small fiord or gulley

Bellow-roar

Nye-flock of birds

Wizen-grain for making beer

Miter bisecting 90 degrees or like mitre tapering to a point in front or back a v

Belays-spike of rock used for tying off a rope or the rope

Keap-concerning agriculture

Weck-weck grain for bread

Ginnet- mule

Billow-spiral

Weir-low dam across river

Juiste-right extended piece

Pattle-small spade to get dirt off plough

Onan-type of generator

Reef- a metalliferous mineral deposit especially one that contains gold

Stow-deposit

Friche-fallow land

Loke-dead end lane

Velga-meadow

Heg-a barrier that serves to enclose an area,

Lacet- knot on a rope

Mall-a sheltered walk or promenade.

Woad=yellow flower scrub ragwort

 

http://legacy.historycolorado.org/sites/default/files/files/OAHP/Programs/PAAC_PikeStockade_Survey_Report_nomap.pdf

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Pikes+Stockade+(replica)/@37.2809337,-105.8349851,14.25z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:0xec515ac32dfdcdc!8m2!3d37.2940897!4d-105.8103501

see the two horseshoe shaped water areas or oxbows

 

 

 

 

 

Appalachia Gold Medallion Designs…

November 2018

by dal…

 

Medallion designs can be submitted to either Dal or Jenny in email. These are designs that were submitted to Dal. You can also look at the designs submitted to Jenny by clicking the link after the last design on this page. This page will be updated as more designs are sent to Dal.

Please submit your designs to only one of us…not both. They will not be posted on both sites.

dal@lummifilm.com
or
info@mysteriouswritings.com

 

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ForrestFennCoin2018

 

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OwlFennCoin

 

You can see the designs that have been submitted to Jenny HERE

 

You can also read about the contest and guidelines by clicking HERE

 

 

 

 

Desert Soliloquy…

NOVEMBER 2018

desert soliloquy front cover

David Rice spent 29 months living alone in a cave in the desolate wilderness of the Avawatz Mountain Range (which borders the southeast side of Death Valley). “Desert Soliloquy; A Perfectly Sane Misanthrope Hides in the Desert” is like combining Walden with Blazing Saddles with a bit of  history about the East Mojave Desert. How David interacted with the desert and the people he encountered while living in his cave is the theme that binds the manuscript together. The memoir includes original research on the region and the historical people who passed through the East Mojave, and includes the most interesting historical events (such as the “last great gun fight” in the USA Southwest) in an easy, humorous narrative.

“I have read Desert Soliloquy by David Rice and I couldn’t put it down. It is a cynical, fabulous, outrageous, politically incorrect, foul-mouthed and absolutely hilarious modern-day Walden.” — Douglas Preston (Lost City of the Monkey God)

You can find out more and purchase the book at Amazon. Click HERE.

Here’s one of my favorite David Rice (aka Desertphile) YouTube videos..Wine from grape juice..HERE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Brown for the Times…

October, 2018

By Stephan

 

William Harvey Brown, b.1862, d.1913

A stout-hearted man if ever there was one!  I imagine that all three of his names will certainly ring a bell with searchers.  Born in South Africa to American parents and later educated at Cornell, he worked for the Smithsonian, and spent more than a few years roaming the Rockies and the American West.  A naturalist, he collected specimens of mammals for display in the museums of his day, rubbing shoulders with some of the 19th Century’s most accomplished taxidermists.  He ended his life in South Africa.

It could well be that museums such as the Denver Museum display to this day some of his specimens in their taxidermy collections.

On one of his expeditions, he helped establish a scientific camp high in the Rockies, which was dubbed “Camp Brown Bear Trail”, so named for the many grizzly trails which then criss-crossed that area.  He resided there for several weeks and hunted for grizzly.

The following is an actual account  from recollections of those days:

“I went up the side of a steep mountain following a small stream to its head.  I chose a large flat rock at the edge of a ledge for my camping place.  The view was marvelous.  On the rock I soon had a fine fire going.  Water was heated and venison toasted.  Though tired, I was much refreshed and cut a great stock of fir spruce boughs which were to serve for a bed that night.  A goodly quantity of wood was gathered for the fire,(which) was now removed nearer the edge of the rock and the spruce boughs spread down.  I stretched my weary bones out on that bed of Mexican feathers and really almost went to sleep and would have had not the fire burned low and a horrible dream about a grizzly roused me.”

Well, I figured this small stream he followed was the creek to paddle up and I figured that this ledge just had to be the blaze in Forrest Fenn’s poem, what with campfires blazing and bones and all..  And wouldn’t you know it, after some considerable effort (difficult but not impossible) and some years, I finally found the Ledge and stood upon it.  The view was truly marvelous.  And yes, I had already considered where warm waters halt: and it led me right to it.

But before I ever went to the Ledge, I figured I had better give the poem a once-over just in case I missed anything.  Good thing I did:

Scant (from Wiktionary)- a block of stone, sawn on two sides down to the bed level.

Marvel (from the Shorter Oxford)- see also marvil.  A child’s marble.

Tarry- of, like, or covered in tar; splattered with tar.

Clear as day, then:  I knew I needed to find a block of stone with black flecks and a marble-like marking of some kind on its face, probably white.

Since I knew Forrest Fenn was a marble champion in 7th grade, I knew I was onto something:

So I climbed to the Ledge at last. It was at an altitude of just barely under 10,200 feet.   I took my best friend with me.  Together we stood on that Ledge, and we keenly felt that we had found Forrest’s special spot.  To stand on the actual rock where a brave and wise naturalist had once camped in the late 19th Cenury, when the wilds were still wild.  He had  even carried a Sharps rifle, as if he wasn’t already wise enough.  And below us, a rare fisherman’s paradise, but virtually unknown, with two perfectly symmetrical horseshoe bends.

Then we turned and gasped as we saw the block of stone beneath us on the Ledge, so scant-like, with a marble on it.  We gazed on it in awe.  But evening drew nigh and so we resolved to return the next day.  And then that night it snowed and snowed.

-by Stephan

 

 

Home of Brown…

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This is for a discussion about “the home of Brown” in Forrest’s poem.

Got an HOB that didn’t work out…or maybe you need an HOB for a certain area…or perhaps you have an idea that needs some fleshing out..

This is the place to discuss all things HOB…

dal…

Appalachia Gold…

October 2018

by dal…

 

A Forrest quote:
“I wish I had another treasure to hide in the Appalachians.”
From Jenny Kile’s Mysterious Writings blog…HERE

Jenny wants to make Forrest’s quip become a reality by hiding several specially minted gold plated medallions in the Appalachian Mountains for folks who live over on the far side of the known universe, to find and keep.

The Appalachian Mountains are outlined in blue

There will be clues of course. Probably less difficult to comprehend than the clues in Forrest’s poem ( just sayin ). But before the medallions are hidden and the clues published we need a medallion.

A blank medallion ready for your imagination

So, use your winter imagination to come up with a design for these keepsake medallions. That’s the first step. Creating a medallion…which has two sides by the way…but this contest is only for the design of one side.

In the next few weeks we will ask for design submissions for the medallion…one side only…Right now you can think and plan and scheme…and send your design to either Jenny or dal.

dal@lummifilm.com
or
info@mysteriouswritings.com

The winning design will be selected by Jenny and me and a third (yet unnamed) person. Forrest will approve the design. Jenny will have 10 or so of them minted and take care of the hiding…

I am not certain who will come up with the clues…I hope I get to play with a few of those…
We might hide a couple in some other mountain range between the two oceans as well…but more about the hidey places and clues later…

Right now it’s time to consider what one side of these coins should look like…
So please put on your designer hats and start thinking about a good design for an Appalachian themed, Forrest Fenn inspired, treasure hunt medallion.

To get you in the spirit…
Are you familiar with James Still…the Appalachian writer?

I first became acquainted with him around high school. I read his novel, River of Earth, about a struggling family, barely subsisting between farming and coal mining in eastern Kentucky in the 1930’s. I don’t know why I bumped into that book. I doubt that it was assigned and I rarely read for pleasure at that point in my life, libraries were a place to be sent when you were being punished for something…but I devoured the folks in that novel…perhaps because of the perplexing differences between their hardscrabble rural existence and my own sanitized urban humdrum. His writing is filled with a sort of Americanistic soul that folks rarely hand out today.

Here is a stanza from one of James Still’s poems called “Spring on Troublesome Creek”

Not all of us were warm, not all of us.
We are winter-lean, our faces are sharp with cold
And there is the smell of wood smoke in our clothes;
Not all of us were warm, though we have hugged the fire
Through the long chilled nights.

So…think “medallion design”…one side only…and there will be more about this add on hunt, in the next month…

Click HERE to look at the medallion designs submitted so far.

-dal

 

 

Vector This App…

Writis, a commenter on this very blog has created an app to aid the searcher who likes to use vectors when searching a particular site…

This app may not be for the geographicly challenged, but for those who use maps and lat/lon this can be very helpful in drawing an “x”on your good map.

It’s strength lays not only in its ability to calculate an “x” but also in it’s ability to create a spreadsheet so you can track your x’s, vectors and points.

What is a vector you ask…Read on. I’ll let Writis explain…

Called “Fenn Treasure X Tools” I decided to make it free, but limited to a 75 mile radius search area centered on Denver,  then a one time in-app-purchase to unlock the full search area.
This way you can see how it works, and if you think it would be useful in your search.
Watch the video (and read the text) on how to use the app at the website:
(website has a link to the app in the app store)
I am really happy about how it came out,  and how well it works.  you can even visualize your “X” in the app.
I am excited to see some solutions show up here on Dal’s blog using the tool, and good luck in the search.
-Writis

Scrapbook One Hundred Ninety Four…

scrapbook

OCTOBER 15, 2018

 

I woke up to snow on the ground this morning in Santa Fe, and a temp. below freezing. I went out to get the paper and about froze. Hopefully all searchers will stay by the fire drinking hot Ovaltine til about May or June. To me, being cold is a lot worse than being hot. All of the Rockies north of SF are now unsearchable to my way of thinking. f-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Argument for New Mexico…


October, 2018

By Clearly Clueless

 

 

I just got back from a trip to the Rocky Mountains with my sister. We had a blast. Last year it was my parents who I dragged out there. We had a blast then, too. We enjoyed several different areas and lots of touristy things. In between stomping through woods and looking for “you know what”, we managed to see lots of balloons in Albuquerque and grab some culture and coffee in Santa Fe. I was one day away from that last book signing….Argggghhh. And, Will in the bookstore did not even mention it, the day before when I popped in…..hmmm.
Things I love about New Mexico….
1. It holds Indulgence …In My Opinion… and I would like to make a case for this below.
2. My hair was not frizzy while there. LOVE this!
3. No allergy problems while there.
4. The weather is so ever changing, the climate is so diverse. I saw a rainbow after getting     pelted by sleet. Strangely, it was very cold in the mornings, but we weren’t miserable. Pleasant.
5. New Mexico has a funny sense of humor. What are you people mowing?

Ok, here is what lead me to search in New Mexico.
In my opinion we read through the poem more than once….several times.
I think the first time through, Mr. Fenn gets us to the correct state.
So, I am going to go through the poem ONLY ONE time THIS TIME and I am going to use Mr. Fenn’s poem/map.

Question: “Are there clues in the TFTW book?”
“Yes, because the map is in the book.”- Forrest Fenn

Question: “Are there clues in the TTOTC book?”
“Yes, because the poem is in the book.” -Forrest Fenn

In my opinion, you have to use his map and his poem.
Ok, go get your copy of Mr. Fenn’s map and let’s look/listen and go through the poem.
“Begin it where warm waters halt….”
Start in Colorado.
Colorado means “colored red”.
Red is a warm color.
So I began “where warm waters halt” at the bottom of the Colorado boarder.
“And take it in the canyon down.” ….the bottom border of Colorado.
Now that we are looking at Mr. Fenn’s map, you will see some Brown shading at that Colorado and New Mexico boarder….go on…look ….why don’t we “put in below the home of Brown.”
*Remember, I believe I am going through this poem several times to get information.
*In my opinion, Brown will be something else another time through.
Now that brown shading takes us down to the wrong end of “NEW”.
If, following along this way, we will have to read backwards.
No problem.
“WEN”
In Britain, “wen” can refer to a large, crowded urban area.
Which I take to mean “no place for the meek.”
After this, we get the idea to go the end of the next word “Mexico”.
So lets goooooo……..
Now, I do realize I skipped a whole lot of words and thoughts, that is ok.
To me some of the other words are important in other ways, other times through.
I can go through with his poem on other maps and in other areas and “see other things.”
This time through I see “New Mexico”.
Does anybody else see “New Mexico”?
Has anybody else found other pictures?
One time through, if you have the right map…..you will grin and smile and want to go running to a particular area in New Mexico.
I live too far off to keep running, I would love a partner who thinks like this.
“Chasing” in metal work is beautiful.
I think Mr. Fenn has brilliantly chased a beautiful picture using his poem.
I do hope the treasure is found soon.
Any comments on going through the poem this way?

Clearly Clueless
P.S. Not Clueless on the clues, I think I have found all 9. I am clueless on how the clues “lead” us to the treasure. I do have some ideas.
I do have one spot, I would love someone to go over.

-Clearly Clueless

 

 

 

Winter’s Warning…

 

SUBMITTED October 11th, 2018
by Forrest

 

It’s 4 degrees above freezing in Denver and West Yellowstone is under snow. So it’s time to stop searching the northern Rocky Mountains for another season. It was fireplace time for me yesterday morning in Santa Fe, but it warmed nicely by afternoon. This note is just a reminder to everyone that the winter mountains can be terribly unforgiving for those get caught out or go unprepared. If you are still searching please stay weather and mud aware. f