I Think The Chest is Here…

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Many searchers have decided the chest is in a general area…maybe even a specific area of the known universe of the Rocky Mountains north of Santa Fe. So this is the place where we can talk about where we, as individuals, think the chest is at…Don’t give away too much though… 🙂

dal…

The Greater Yellowstone Medicine Wheel……

SUBMITTED JUNE 2018
by John edo

 

You know I can’t leave well enough alone. After doing the “Holy Blazes” post here on the home of Dal and receiving some feed-back; I was just about ready to throw away this search area. The face at the Firehole, the mark in the tree at the bottom of Tom’s trail, and the owl of Minerva tetradrachm just seemed to be too coincidental. I went back to my first clue and it didn’t seem right. Cynthia had posted about the sign at Reynolds Pass on the border of Idaho and Montana and got response post form Forrest that he had never seen the sign in winter. It happens to fall on the continental divide splitting 2 watersheds to the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Begin where warm waters halt. Halt means lame, limp, foolish. And there has to be some connection from this clue to the next and to the end as they are contiguous. Following from Reynolds pass to “the canyon” down. The canyon seems to imply an obvious choice as due East of Reynolds pass is the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. It happens to also pass over an arrowhead pointing that direction and reminded me of Young Forrest’s arrowhead. Take it means to grasp, and hints at riches new and old treasures.

At the bottom of tom’s trail was this mark in the tree.

Not far, but too far implies that the clues are opposites and spaced apart from one another. The opposites and balance made me think of the medicine wheel and using the Lakota star map I tried to connect the rest of the clues.

Put in below the home of brown still makes me scratch my head, as put in can mean to launch a boat or also put in means solitary confinement. There is also a “t” and a “bel” in that line that make the word belt. The star map has the milky way in the back ground or the belt of Orion is the 3 stars in the wrist of the hand constellation. The stars are also known as “Las Tres Marias” or the 3 Marys. In Yellowstone there is a Mary mountain West, East, and middle, and they happen to form a straight line.

So home could be a flat, narrow area and that makes me think of the fire escape and making his pants brown when he skipped class. He could leave and be alone. The slide was also a gateway and I believe it to be Devils’s slide. The next line of the poem seems to confirm that as from there its no place for the meek. From there sounds like from mother it’s to place for them. At the end of the line the word mother can also be found backwards and jumbled: no place fOR THE Meek. So your mother’s mother is your grandmother and devils slide happens to be at the point of castor and pullox on the star chart. Castor and Pullox happen to be twins just like Forrest’s grandmother A line from devils slide to mammoth hot springs continues to no place for them. Opposite of mother is father, and opposite of fire is water. Water has an old definition of Adam’s ale, and line continues to Yellowstone Lake fishing bridge. But no place for them is the RV park just to the East.

The end is ever drawing nigh, sounds like the hand is severed drawing in eye. So the Lakota circle coming back to the eye in the Firehole and looking up to mirror plateau gives you another line that runs right thru the Grand canyon of Yellowstone. Mirror Plateau happens to be the Pleiades star on the Lakota star map. From the face you also have mire or stuck in the mud to admire yourself in the mirror; hence all the me, mine, and I comments by Forrest.

There’ll be no paddle up your creek took me a while to figure out. “LL” when sounding out, sounds like ells. Ells are 90 degree pipe bends and no paddle refers to water. Just above the Firehole at the Madison river and Firehole river junction, the river makes a perpendicular “T”; and so there are the ells. So not going up that creek we are heading down.

Just heavy loads and water high made perfect sense after figuring out the no paddle clue. Heading straight down from eye, the grand prismatic spring and old faithful fell into place. They also aligned to stars on the Lakota map. Procyon is the blossom, and the grand spring is just that. Beautiful all year around! Old faithful is water high, or Sirius.  Some of you might know about Sirius and being known as the dog star, and I would never insult Peggy in that way, but rather as the most faithful companion in Forrest’s life. That’s why the heavy loads is a halo he’s putting on Peggy. She is his saint and the ode to Peggy speaks volumes of his love and affection for her. The reference to backwards bicycle also fits to work clues backwards from water high, and ride bike to water high and throw it in.

Just in this line is also right, which back from the point of the arrow and looking from direction of eye, is right following the N,S,W,E of the compass.

If you have been wise and found the blaze. I still struggle with this one. Is the found the blaze an established beginning or a central marker? The lines don’t exactly line up to the center. It’s almost like they still need to be made right. In the upper right of the Lakota star map is Capella or buffalo gap which is the Lamar Valley. The star Rigel is also known as the silver star and is dot island in the “hand” of Yellowstone Lake. The silver star was also an award given to Forrest for his service in Vietnam.

Betelgeuse is known as “owl eyes flicking”, or watching the ceremonies, and is the only point not on this map. I believe it’s a reference to his father the wise owl looking down upon him burning candles at both ends.

Look quickly down at the lower falls at the right time of day and you will see a rainbow or should I say moonbow. Across from Uncle Tom’s Trail it also looks like a petroglyph of a horse’s head drinking from the falls. This is also a dead end and your quest will cease here.

The points fit in a circle as well. The center seems to be Grebe Lake, but the points line up to the lower falls. The points also almost line up to tarry point if you google search it. If mirror plateau moves to amethyst mountain they are right on.

So there you have the medicine wheel in Yellowstone. The symbol and lines still seem to be halted or lame clues, and nothing has been unlocked to the location of the chest. There is still much more in the poem to listen too.  But; tells you to join the tarry scant and marvel gaze. In the medicine wheel there is a bald center spot, and when overlaid that is a short distance south of the lower falls. The MA-RV-EL gaze is the direction to head. MA is mammoth, RV is by the fishing bridge, and EL is the line, or the track of the train you would get hit by.

Here comes the word Just again. And it’s to take the chest and go in peace. But I see it as the chi stand or balance, or like Forrest: ME in the middle. Peace is that balance, the harmony, the health and wellspring.

So why must you go? It’s the way of life to run the race and return to where you came. Mother Earth, Gaia. And the trove is left to each of us to find our own way, and we should be actively seeking to better the lives of those around us; Smile at a homely girl!

The a(NSWE)rs he already knows? Of course; they are the points of life, the map of where one has been; and you are tired and weak as you have exhausted your life in pursuit of those answers.

HEAR comes the big kicker. Listen to the words in the poem to the gold now.

Sow ear meal and list ten good, your fort twill be worthy cold.

If few are brave and dint hew wood dig ivey out it lead to the gold.

WHAT? Did you hear that? Or did you read between the lines. Use that same logic and read thru the poem again.

Let’s also a-JUST a couple of those clues to unlock the poem. The circle with a dot in the center is used by Native Americans as the symbol for mother. It’s also the symbol for gold. So with the circle and line we can adjust them to form the symbol for woman and standing it upright she becomes the guardian of the gold: “when she sees it”.

I’m starting to trail off and leaving information out, but this essay is getting longer than I thought. I am definitely not hoping for an “A”, but rather an “F”!

-John edo

 

My 10,000 Mile Boots On The Ground Adventure……

SUBMITTED MAY 2018
by RockLicker61

 

Well OK, it was only actually 9,800 miles door to door, but unless someone from South Africa has gone searching I think I can still claim the unenvied title of Furthest-Travelled Failed Searcher.

For me this craziness started after reading a news story in March 2018. It was a day that I couldn’t be bothered doing any work, so I found myself digging around the blogs and forums and I was quickly hooked.

Within a couple of days I had the basis of my solve sorted out, then it was refined and strengthened over the next couple of weeks to what you will read today. The solve builds on the work of others to narrow down the WWWH starting point, but I’m presenting a couple of (possibly) new ideas on some lines of the poem, particularly the blaze, so hopefully you may both enjoy the story and get something useful out of it.

In its simplest interpretation this solve doesn’t rely on any information you can’t find on a good map, but a small amount of googling and a bit of geographical knowledge help firm things up. Unlike many solves people come up with, I had this one down to a fairly specific area months before I put boots on the ground. This was by necessity – I’m a New Zealander living in Perth, Western Australia, so if I was going to invest (haha!) a few thousand dollars into getting to the Rockies I couldn’t afford to be going on a hunch.

But I’d just sold my trusty old pickup so I had some play money lying around, and I have a very understanding wife! In early May I found myself setting off for the 39 hour journey to Bozeman Montana. There I rendezvoused with one of my brothers who lives in Phoenix and couldn’t say no to this sort of adventure.

So armed with a healthy dose of jet lag and a can of bear spray, this is our chase…

Begin it where warm waters halt,
And take it in the canyon down
Not too far, but too far to walk
Put in below the home of Brown

This simply follows the popular solve starting where the warm Gardiner River meets the cold Yellowstone River at Gardiner Montana, then following the Yellowstone River down to the Slip and Slide Boat Ramp near the end of Joe Brown creek.

From there it’s no place for the meek

This boat ramp is used by rafters and kayakers to access the white-water rapids in Yankee Jim Canyon – definitely no place for the meek.
A less obvious interpretation is that this canyon was a stumbling block for Joseph Meek in his early exploration of the area (though this obviously requires knowledge beyond the scope that Forrest Fenn says is necessary).

The end is ever drawing nigh

This refers to the bottom of Sphinx Creek, the first feature we come to down-stream, and there’s a few ways of looking at it:
The flowing creek is continuously ending as it reaches the river.
The word “drawing” could be used because the bottom of Sphinx Creek is in a draw (also known as a re-entrant outside of the USA), which is a steep-sided gully.

Also, it’s on the left, and numerous people have asserted that nigh is an archaic word for left, though I haven’t found any solid references for this.

There’ll be no paddle up your creek
Just heavy loads and water high

Sphinx Creek is merely a trickle, even when we visited during the melt in May, so you won’t need a paddle.

The second line defines the bottom and top of the creek as we go up it.

Heavy loads describes the bottom of the creek which crosses the Old Yellowstone Trail and where the railway line used to go.

The top of the creek is a perched lake (high water) called Yankee Jim Lake.

So we head up the creek all the way to the lake.

Fresh bear tracks of different sizes were dotted all the way up Sphinx Creek – a bit worrying for us as we’d never had to deal with bears before!

If you’ve been wise and found the blaze. Look quickly down

OK, here’s where it gets interesting.

Notice the past tense on this sentence – in my opinion you have to have already been wise and found the blaze before you get there. In this case that’s because you can’t actually see it from the lake at the top of the creek.

So to find the blaze, you need to know where to look.

Have you noticed the red magnetic declination lines on the map provided in Where Warm Waters Halt? I find them odd because they’re a bit ugly, and many versions of the map have removed them for aesthetic reasons. But what are they for? It’s not normal to have these lines on a simple schematic map like this. Magnetic declination is used when you’re using a compass bearing – the lines tell you what the correction is between true north and magnetic north is at a particular spot. The presence of the magnetic declination lines is telling me that you need to use some sort of compass reading, or at least a general bearing to some remote feature in your solve.

So what is the blaze?

If you look on a map about 6.5 miles / 11 kilometres to the south west of Yankee Jim Lake, you find Shooting Star Mountain.

Shooting stars blaze across the sky, and you have to look quickly to see them.

Forrest has mentioned that it would be possible to remove it the blaze, but not feasible. I know from experience in the mining industry that removing the top of a mountain is definitely possible, but you have to have a good reason to do so to make it feasible.

But you can’t see Shooting Star Mountain from the top of Sphinx Creek, it’s hidden by the ridge on the other side of the valley. Luckily there are high points all around Yankee Jim Lake, but for this solve, you need to be “wise” and move clockwise around the lake.

A drone photo of Yankee Jim Lake, looking roughly north west, with the high point where you can see the blaze on the left

As you reach the highest point on the south-west side, Shooting Star Mountain just peeks into view above the ridge.

Another drone photo, with the high point in the foreground and Shooting Star Mountain peeking just above the ridge, slightly left of centre of the photo

I was 99% sure I’d be able to see Shooting Star Mountain from this high point as I’d used the 3D view in Google Earth and a viewshed analysis in QGIS to verify this beforehand. Still, it was a massive relief when we reached the top and Shooting Star Mountain just came into view!

Look quickly down your quest to cease

When you’re at the top of the hill and the blaze has come into view, then look down and you see a series of rock faces below you.

But tarry scant with marvel gaze
Just take the chest and go in peace

And this is where this solve joins the long list of failures!

It was a beautiful spot, with sweeping views of the valley dotted with lakes and meadows framed by distant mountains.

The view from the solve location – a fitting spot for a final resting place

We searched all along the rock faces, covering everything up to 200 feet away from the peak (in reference to the 200 feet that Forrest says searchers have been within). There were plenty of perfect little hiding places, but alas, no chest.

One of the many chest-sized nooks in the rock faces

The original solve was a bust, but I knew that I had to get closure and I had to exhaust all options before we left Montana. So, on the second day of our trip we searched all of the rock faces between the top of the creek and high point from the first solve, thinking I may have misinterpreted how to use the blaze reference.

My brother left to go back to work the next morning, but I spent that third day searching the main peak of Sphinx Mountain, and all of the rock faces on the south west side facing the blaze. Again, I found many amazing spots with beautiful views over Yankee Jim Lake, and lots of potential hiding places, but no chest.

The view over Yankee Jim Lake during the third day of searching

Our (approximate) search coverage around Yankee Jim Lake

So I go in peace, having spent an awesome couple of days hiking in Montana with my brother. We found some amazing spots, plenty of fresh bear tracks, and walked away with a couple of deer antlers as trophies.

Our trophies adorning the rental car

It’s a common cliché in The Chase circles, but this experience gave us moments to treasure, even though we walked away empty-handed.

So as my final act of closure in this chase, I’m putting this failed solve out to the world so that you might hopefully glean some insight that helps you in your chase.

You can see my solution on a Google map by clicking HERE.

I’ll be lurking on Dal’s website, Reddit and THOR under the username RockLicker61 if you want to discuss this solve. Or drop me an email at the same username @gmail.com if you want to get in touch directly.

Stay safe out there, the bears are always watching you!

-RockLicker61

I Think The Chest is Here…Part Four

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This page is now closed to new comments. To continue this discussion please go to the newest I Think The Chest Is Here page.

Many searchers have decided the chest is in a general area…maybe even a specific area of the known universe of the Rocky Mountains north of Santa Fe. So this is the place where we can talk about where we, as individuals, think the chest is at…Don’t give away too much though… 🙂

dal…

Home of Brown…Part Five

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This page is closed to new comments. To continue the discussion please go to the newest HOB page.

 

This is for a discussion about “the home of Brown” in Forrest’s poem.

Got an HOB that didn’t work out…or maybe you need an HOB for a certain area…or perhaps you have an idea that needs some fleshing out..

This is the place to discuss all things HOB…

dal…

Home of Brown…Part Four

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This page is now closed to new comments. To continue the discussion please go to the latest Home of Brown page.

 

This is for a discussion about “the home of Brown” in Forrest’s poem.

Got an HOB that didn’t work out…or maybe you need an HOB for a certain area…or perhaps you have an idea that needs some fleshing out..

This is the place to discuss all things HOB…

dal…

Tale of Two Solves – Part Two

SUBMITTED JULY 2017
by DUSTIN IN ARKANSAS

 

After the first solve failed I went back to the hotel room and started working on coordinates. I had a general area of where I wanted to go, but did it match up to the poem?  I worked on coordinates for about four IPA beers long and then stepped away.  Granted I drink very slowly, it took me about 5 hours.  I’m on to something now, but it can wait.  Let’s go back and base my Solve on absolutely nothing….like before.

Where would warm waters halt? Puddles in West Yellowstone? Big Sky, Montana?  Let’s put that together.

“Begin it where warm waters halt and take it in the canyon down”.  This to me was leaving West Yellowstone towards Big Sky, Montana in Gallatin Canyon.  By the way, I’m 100000% confident it’s in the Gallatin National Forrest during this time.  Of course, I’ve been wrong all along.

“Not far but too far to walk.  Put in below the home of Brown.”  This partially meant I needed to put in the water as soon as I left West Yellowstone and follow it north. I’d rather not say what I believe is the home of Brown.

“From there, it’s no place for the meek, the end is ever drawing nigh;”.  Well wouldn’t you know it?  Next up the road was this little gem –

It made me think of the gypsy story where they partied and played music until late into the night.

Since “nigh” means left, I should take a left here.  So I did.  The road is called Taylor Fork Road.  This made me remember Forrest talking about taking a fork in the road.  Hmm.

Next down the road I went over a creek and pulled off after it.

“There’ll be no paddle up your creek, just heavy loads and water high.”  There is a lake up there.  What if “no” means don’t go?  Let’s try that.

Up from the creek on the right is Lincoln Mountain!

“If you’ve been wise and found the blaze”.  Well, he said the best education he ever got was in five minutes with his dad.  One of which was about honesty.  Honest Abe.  Looking at the mountain, I’m wondering if this section is the blaze or it is around the area.  It’s terrible when you start making the blaze what you want it to be.  I believe you’ll know it when you see it.  Looking at the side facing south, it looks like lightening marks.  I’ll get to that in a moment.

“Look quickly down your quest to cease.”  Looking down from what I thought was the blaze, there was an odd dead tree towards the top in the middle of the lightening marks.  Picture coming.  Even if I had taken the creek around and then went south “been wise”, I would have ended up at the same location and looking down at the same tree.

“But tarry scant with marvel gaze, just take the chest and go in peace.”  This to me meant I needed to follow the horse trail along the mountain to get to the blaze.  By the way, he said it wasn’t in close proximity to a human trail. He never said it wasn’t in close proximity to a horse trail. This to me was the marvel (Thor/lightening) gaze that I needed to stay within while searching:

Did you see how the side of the mountain looks like lightening bolts above?  I know a lot of mountains have this feature, but here we are.  Along the horse trail I was able to walk to the tree (in the wood) and check it out

I immediately looked under it, inside of it, and around it.  There was a HUGE opening on the side of the wood, but no treasure. It could have held several 10×10 chests.

The best part to me was the view.  “If I were standing where the treasure chest is, I’d see trees, I’d see mountains, I’d see animals, and I know the chest is wet.”  I wondered how you’d plan to always see animals if you were where the chest was. Well, across the way is a ranch with horses.  Crazy.

With the Gallatin River below me, and yes it’s in the Flywater book, I was sure it’s the right mountain.  It’s within the elevation remark.

I’m just in the wrong spot and in the wrong wood.  I should go back up the creek to the water high.  We made it a little over a mile until it started to rain and lightening. We had to head back.  Plus, a grizzly was growling at us from the other side of the creek.  If you haven’t ever been in that scenario, let’s just hope you don’t have to be.  We left.  Yes, we looked in the trees between the river and the mountain, along the river, and in a few other places.

Oh, and when I got below the mountainside, I checked the coordinates of where I was and my stomach turned. Those numbers looked familiar to what I was working on yesterday! 44…111… and I don’t remember the others.  44 West Yellowstone section.  Pot holes of water?  111 no place for the meek? “DO NOT TOUCH!!” Is the physical solve an alternate to the coordinate solve? Yet they both lead you to the same location?  Lewis and Clark cipher?  Why does the identification card on the front of the book have a picture of him as a kid?  Why does the ID card have certain letters on the left highlighted section in a darker tape color? Why do these letters highlighted say N A CIPHER…? Yes I know it technically says “N A CIPHEM” but the “M” is cut off to make an “R”.  This is now part of my final solve I’m working on….only to give it away to someone else once I’m done.  Let me know if you’re interested in having it.

I can’t do this any longer.  I’m going to be a dad in two months and my time will now be spent working on her room and reading books on how to be a great father.  That excites me more than The Chase.

Even though Solve #2 was a little messy, especially being done within 24 hours, I really liked it.  It had more heart, came together better with the book, and had a better location IMO.  I know I executed it poorly and I didn’t allot enough time for it.  Darn storm!

Fenn is a new four letter between my wife and I. It’s kind of funny.

Good luck to you all and as Forrest said to me, “Be safe in the mountains. Take no risks. F”

Fin,
Dustin in Arkansas-

Tale of Two Solves – Part One

SUBMITTED JULY 2017
by DUSTIN IN ARKANSAS

 

I’m from Arkansas and I’ve been involved with The Chase for a month now. Here are a few tidbits, IMO, I now believe from my searches:

1. Always eat a good breakfast.
2. I failed to solve the poem.
3. Read the book over and over until you go mad.
4. When I punched in the coordinates of solve #2, most of the numbers matched up to the pages in the book referring to the specific parts in the poem. That was odd. It leads me to believe the location will be in Wyoming or Montana.
5. There are a zillion know-it-alls on the web that are rude and treasure-less. Shocker.
6. I hope Dal finds it.
7. I’m done with The Chase. I wrote, dated, and signed a note to my wife that I would stop this nonsense haha. Fin. If anyone would like to reach out to me, they can. Before you begin to think you know exactly where it is, I can bet it’s not the place. I believe you have to use the poem to solve the clues, then use those clues in such a way that they will uncover and lead you to the general area in which the chest is hidden. I don’t have the complete solve on this, but it’s pretty near complete. You WILL in fact need more than just TTOTC, the poem, and the map. I can go into great detail if anyone wants to reach out to me at: rizzero@gmail.com

Solve #1-

Let me begin with saying this solve was completely fabricated based on hunches and derailing from the book. Looking back, we had a terrific time even though it didn’t pan out.

“Begin it where warm waters halt.” This to me was Mammoth Hot Springs. In love with Yellowstone.

“And take it in the canyon down.” This was Gardiner Canyon.

“Not far but too far to walk.” 10ish miles.

“Put in below the home of Brown”. We put in between Gardiner and Jardine where Joe Brown had his mining operation.

“From there it’s no place for the meek.” In the book it talks about how the Comanches would raid the barn and stir up a commotion with the chickens. Next to Gardiner was Turkey Pen Creek (yes we searched that too).

“The end is ever drawing nigh.” That meant that it was coming up on our left. Bear Creek.

“There’ll be no paddle up your creek, just heavy loads and water high.” This was Castle Lake, the mining scars, the boulders, and the mining tailings all connected to Bear Creek.

“If you’ve been wise and found the blaze, look quickly down your quest to cease.
But tarry scant with marvel gaze just take the chest and go in peace.” We walked up the Bear Creek trail until we came to the only clearing you will find on the trail.

Across the clearing was a white mark on the hillside. When the sun is out of the east it really ignites. The tarry scant and marvel gaze part was for us to slowly go down like Spiderman. It’s wasn’t bad at all. An 80 year old man could have done it.

At the bottom of the hill was a hollowed out log and I was pretty pumped about it. I whipped out the flashlight and…negative. We continued to the creek, searched in it, around it, and even walked down it below the blaze. No bueno.

All-in-all I have to say that this was a bust. Do not waste your time on this one. We checked everywhere thoroughly. We even went below the creek where it meets Yellowstone River. Maybe it’s up at Castle Lake? If that’s true, then that should be the ONLY place you waste your time. Get a horse, and after you’ve wasted your time read the book again.

Sincerely,
Dustin in Arkansas-

Up Near Hebgen Lake…

SUBMITTED JULY 2017
by Brandon

 

Let me start with the fact that I have never been to Yellowstone.  Although I live in Colorado, which is beautiful and has numerous lakes, rivers and amazing scenery, I was blown away at the majestic mountains and landscape that Yellowstone and the surrounding areas have to offer.  We arrived in Island Park, ID on Monday.  We had a cabin that was 30 minutes to the west entrance and I couldn’t wait to get started.  I had a couple of locations that I wanted to search and they both followed the same first few clues, from there is where I was split on what to do next.  I am not gonna pull all the exact quotes and exactly which videos I got my information from cause I don’t have the time, but I’m sure all the bloggers can check for me, so for now, I’ll stick to paraphrasing.

Begin it where warm waters halt.  Forrest what does warm mean to you?  Forrest replies “Comfortable”  What waters is Forrest most comfortable in? Fly water of course.  Which fly water, the fly waters of Yellowstone.  The Firehole, Gibbon and Madison rivers are designated flywaters only.  And where do they halt? The Yellowstone boundary line at Bakers Hole on the Madison, which all flow in one direction out of the park.  Speaking of Bakers Hole, IMO Forrest’s comments about making a cake or whatever and leaving out a few ingredients, would you achieve your goal?  Wouldn’t that be just like Forrest to be hinting about Bakers Hole?

And take it in the canyon down.  To me this meant the canyon that actually did come down.  The Madison River Canyon.  The earthquake in 1959 brought part of that canyon down, forming quake lake.

Not far, but too far to walk.  From Bakers Hole to the put in below the home of Brown is too far to walk and this simply means to drive there.

Put in below the home of Brown.  This is where I have two theory’s as to the put in, but my home of Brown is Hebgen Lake.

Forrest makes the comment that your destination is small but its location is huge.  Well in TTOTC Forrest describes Hebgen lake as huge.  My 1st theory for the put in is the boat ramp at quake lake is actually the old highway that is now submerged under quake lake.  My 2nd theory is just below Hebgen dam,

which is the 1st place you are allowed to put in with a raft, although you cannot fish from your boat in this section, just put in. Forrest says in one interview that he did not want to discuss when he found his special place because it would give too much away.  I always believed he said that because if he said 1962 or sometime similar it would let you know the earthquake of 1959 which reshaped some of the land there, had something to do with the solve.  Why not just say he found it when he was a kid or teenager?

theory 2
From there its no place for the meek.

below the dam are all kinds of warning signs.  One theory I never got to execute is this clue meaning to cross the street.  If you google the definition of meek, one of the synonyms for meek is biddable.  No place for biddies.  That whole chapter is about those biddies saying he couldn’t cross the street and he thought he could cross the street whenever he wanted too.  What do you think?

The end is ever drawing nigh.  As you put in below hebgen dam and head upstream, you are on the left and its not far in distance to walk up.

There’ll be no paddle up your creek.  Below the dam is definitely something you cannot paddle up.

Just heavy loads and water high.  Sure sounds like a dam to me.  Forrest said warm waters halt is not a dam.  He did not say Heavy loads and water high isn’t.  Which I also thought went perfectly with why your below the home of Brown.

If you’ve been wise and found the blaze

This was my blaze.  Its something permanent that would not be feasible to remove.

Well I looked quickly down and around and all over the place but did not find the treasure.  Although I did find many great memories with my family.

Back to theory 1,

Once I was standing at the boat ramp, which is the old highway and got to:
From there its no place for the meek,
the end is ever drawing nigh;
there’ll be no paddle up your creek,
just heavy loads and water high.

I thought this was referring to Beaver Creek, which enters the Madison right at the beginning of Quake Lake.  Hence the semicolon connecting the two.  In one of the videos, I think its the logging video, Forrest talks about pulling a lodgepole pine behind a 10 horsepower motor and says, “now that was a heavy load.”  So in this theory my heavy loads and water high was all the trees in the Madison and Quake lake where it forms.

Well I hiked all around that area and up Beaver creek, but didn’t find anything.  Again we had a great time and will definitely visit the area again.  But for now, back to square one.

I hope someone will maybe continue with something I missed.  Once you are physically there you realize how this thing could be anywhere.  Its a huge area.  Please feel free to leave your comments.  I wanted to attach the pictures as my story went along but am not much of a computer guy.  I tried subscribing to your site and just got too confused on how to post this there, so I thought I would email it to you.  Thank you Forrest, Dal and everyone else who contributes to this blog.

Brandon-

Lake Creek Valley….

SUBMITTED JULY 2017
by CHRIS

 

I’m from Connecticut, and have been looking for the treasure for four years. I’ve just come home from my third trip to Montana, and I’d decided this was going to be my last trip. I gave the hunt my best shot, and now I can “retire” in peace. I’m grateful that I had an excuse to head out to the Rockies, which are unlike anything in Connecticut or Long Island where I grew up.

Although I never found the treasure, it is my hope that someone does. To that end, I’d like to share my “solve” with the community in hopes that it might help others. Dal, would you mind posting this on your blog? Thank you!

“Begin it where the warm waters halt…”
In chapter 5 of Too Far to Walk (“River Bathing is Best”), Forrest describes bathing in the heated waters of the Firehole River. The Firehole empties into the colder Madison River around Madison Junction, and the Madison continues to be cold.

“And take it in the canyon down…”
The Madison River flows down through a big canyon west of Madison Junction. So, head on down the Madison River.

“Not far, but too far to walk…”
Going back to chapter 5, Forrest mentions riding a bike 20 miles to get from West Yellowstone to his bathing spot on the Firehole. That distance would take about six hours to walk, so follow the Madison River to West Yellowstone, MT.

“Put in below the home of Brown.”
Forrest is an avid fly fisherman. The Madison has brown trout. I’ve read in a book on fly fishing in Yellowstone Park that the trout migrate in and out of Hebgen Lake. So, continue on down the Madison River downstream of Hebgen Lake.

“From there it’s no place for the meek…”
If you drive east along MT 287 past Earthquake Lake, you’ll see a sign referring to the “Night of Terror” – the night that the earthquake that formed the lake. So, continue down the Madison past Earthquake Lake.

“The end is ever drawing nigh…”
In the “Looking for Lewis and Clark” chapter of Thrill of the Chase, Forrest describes how Osborne Russell and his companions were attacked by Blackfeet to the west of Hebgen Lake. I spent a few weeks pouring over Journal of a Trapper and I figured out that the battle occurred near the mouth of the West Fork of the Madison, near where West Fork Madison campsite is now. You can see the area as you drive up Forrest Service Road 209. A flat area by the river where the trapping party camped, beneath tall walls of the canyon, from which 80 Blackfeet shot down at them in the surprise attack. So, move on up the West Fork of the Madison.

“There’ll be no paddle up your creek…”
Lake Creek empties into the West Fork of the Madison not far upstream from the battle site. Except for a small portion – Smith Lake – it is not navigable. The creek runs up a beautiful little valley. So, go up the valley.

“Just heavy loads…”
This was a tough clue, as the only mention of the word “load” or anything that suggest heavy loads in Forrest’s treasure-related writings is with Cody the Buffalo in the “Buffalo Cowboys” chapter of Thrill of the Chase. I believe that incident took place near Denny Creek Road south of Hebgen Lake, but that’s far from Lake Creek. However, if you take the trail up Lake Creak Valley (trail number 732), you’ll encounter a field of boulders halfway up the valley. These boulders are big – roughly the size of buffaloes. I haven’t seen boulders like that anywhere else in my trips out to Montana and Yellowstone, so I’m calling them significant.

“… and water high.”
As you go to the end of Lake Creek Valley, the land becomes rolling hills, ending up with a ridge that separates the valley from Wade Lake.

“If you’re wise and found the blaze, look quickly down…”
As you approach Wade Lake from Lake Creek Valley, all of a sudden the blue waters of Wade Lake comes into view. It’s a spectacular sight. So I interpreted this as the blaze and to head on down the ridge towards Wade Lake, but I couldn’t find a suitable spot to hide the chest. The vegetation around there is insane and somewhat impassable.

If I were to head out there again, I would look for the headwaters of Lake Creek as another possibility for “water high.” Maybe there’s a little waterfall? The creek comes down from a forested area up the valley slope.

If anyone is interested in searching this area, here are three important bits of advice to consider…

  1. The easiest way to get there is from the trailhead on Forrest Service Road 209.  From there, its a two-mile hike up gentle terrain.  Walking along the shores of Wade Lake is hard and not recommended.
  2. This valley has a lot of bear activity.  I was told by locals at The Buffalo Bar in West Yellowstone that that valley has a lot of grizzlies.  I saw no less than a dozen bear poops in the rolling hills towards the top of the valley.  Plan your trip accordingly.
  3. I met an older gentleman on Forrest Service Road 209 who told me that not many people know of this valley.  Try to keep it pristine.

I’ve attached a photo of Lake Creek Valley.  I still can’t believe I was there!

So thank you Forrest for starting the chase, and thank you Dal for maintaining your website.  And please forward my best wishes and luck to those still on the chase!

Regards,
Chris-