Forrest Gets Mail – 25

famcamp

Sometimes I just want to put my arms around someone and give them a boa hug. f

Dear Mr Fenn,
Thank you for hiding the treasure. My family and I spent 3 weeks together laughing , exploring, taking pictures and looking for a treasure… well I want you to know that we found it… ok so maybe it’s not gold and precious stones in a brass box.

Because of you sir we have memories none of us will forget. You see when we returned home, happier that we have been in a long time,  mom and dad were out for dinner when a drunk driver hit them we lost dad, he has gone home to be with Jesus, and mom is still in the hospital.

But sir because you hid a little box the last memories we have of dad is him fly fishing and watching as he ran from a buffalo that snuck up on him, we remember mom singing while cooking eggs  over a campstove, laughing, we kids were talking and none of us could remember ever seeing mom and dad so happy.

We have cried a lot in the last 3 weeks, but we are all so grateful to have been able to find the real treasure.

Forever grateful,
dyannea

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Fox and Hounds…

March 2020
by Muset

 

Here is an exercise for anybody who wants to play with anagrams.  The original poem line is “begin it where warm waters halt.”  Try and find an anagram for that line, given the context of the following story.  Don’t worry about punctuation.  If you get it correct, I think you may also learn the key word.

Back in 2018 I took vacation to London to see some of the many museums that I hadn’t yet visited.  One of those places was the Imperial War Museum and they had a special area reserved for displaying the medals and short biographies of many of the Victoria Cross medal recipients.

Philip Neame was born 12 December, 1888 in southeast England when Jack the Ripper was terrorizing east London .

Neame joined the Royal Engineers in 1908 and found himself in the French trenches during WWI.  He set about improvising hand grenades from jam jars, scrap metal and gun cotton.  

He received the Victoria Cross, among other honours, for single-handedly fending off a German counter-attack with field-improvised grenades in 1914.  

He won an Olympic gold medal in 1924 for a sharp-shooting-on-the-move event called the Running Deer.  The Olympic medal was not in the display cabinet but there were seventeen other medals in addition to the Victoria Cross packed in there.

In February of 1940, Philip was posted to Egypt and Trans-Jordan as a high-ranking division commander.  The Suez Canal was a very strategic British asset, being the main trade route to its imperial possession India.  The Red Sea is tropical but the Mediterranean is several degrees colder.

suez egypt

There are military bases are along the canal.

Things were going well for the Allies in North Africa until Marshal Erwin Rommel, the “Desert Fox,” arrived at Tripoli, Libya, in February of 1941 with two tank divisions.

Unfortunately for Philip, he was one of three generals among thousands of his men in the armoured division and Australian division all captured in Libya by Rommel’s Deutsches Afrika Korps (DAK) in April, 1941.  The actual German commander who captured them was Gerhard von Schwerin.  The other two captured generals were John Combe and Richard O’Connor.

Max 12

https://www.o5m6.de/wehrmacht/max.php

The three captured British generals were each in their several armoured command vehicle, the AEC (Associated Equipment Company) “Dorchester,” nicknamed after the famous Dorchester Hotel in London because they were so capacious and comfortable.  Marshal Rommel liked those vehicles so much he used them for himself and his own staff.  The Germans renamed those armoured beasts DAK “Mammoth”.  The fox was dressed like the hound.

image

A Dorchester/Mammoth over-painted with the German cross.

 Incarcerated in Italy near Florence, the British generals spent seven months constructing an escape tunnel along with their new prison friends Brigadiers James Hargest and Reginald Miles of New Zealand, and Sir Adrian Carton de Wiart, who also had a Victoria Cross medal from action in 1916 France.

The two New Zealanders made it safely to Switzerland, but the four Britons were all recaptured within a fortnight and reunited in their prison at Castello di Vincigliata near Florence with a month-long solitary penalty.

800px Castello di vincigliata2C torre 2

Castello di Vincigliata– Gaoler to the rich and famous.

Erwin Rommel’s final North African offensive had failed only a few weeks earlier in March, 1943, even with the addition of new Tiger tanks of the 501 Panzer Division joining in November, 1942.  Rommel was reassigned to Greece and then France.

Incredibly in August, 1943, Sir Adrian Carton de Wiart was escorted from prison to Rome on the orders of the Italian King and Prime Minister to be the messenger to Britain concerning Italy’s desire for an armistice with the Allies. 

The September 3, 1943 Italian Armistice lead to Neame’s release into the Nazi-held countryside with companions Combe, O’Connor and Marshal Owen Boyd.  They made their way just over a hundred miles to the coast near Rimini.  Combe joined the local Libero partisans while the rest hired a boat making it to Allied-occupied territory at Termoli in December, 1943.  

Combe made it back to Britain in May, 1944.  That same month Erwin Rommel joined the resistance against Hitler, which failed in July and sealed his fate.  He accepted the offer of suicide to spare his family.

Sadly, Marshal Boyd died from a heart attack in August, 1944, at least at home in London.

Gerhard von Schwerin went on to survive Stalingrad with great honours and then Aachen with heroism by trying to spare the civilians and architecture of that immensely important historic town.  He was later captured in Italy by the British forces in April, 1945 and released two years later after the war.

Philip Neame was appointed Lieutenant Governor of Guernsey in August 1945 and knighted in 1946, among many other honours.

Nobody knows what happened to the three DAK Mammoths but they were probably abandoned somewhere out in the Sahara Desert, broke down and no fuel.

-by Muset

 

 

 

 

The Poem as Riddle…

rid

December 2019
by dal

BrainDen.com (http://brainden.com/logic-riddles.htm) states that a riddle is simply a statement which has a secret meaning.

They give as an example the following old favorite:

Brothers and sisters I have none but this man’s father is my father’s son.
Who is the man?

The answer of course is “the man is my son”.

But my favorite riddle from BrainDen could be a model for solving the puzzle of Forrest’s poem:

What is greater than God,
more evil than the devil,
the poor have it,
the rich need it,
and if you eat it, you’ll die?

The answer “nothing”.

At first unveiling the answer “nothing” sounds like a cheat…but it is not…and is best understood by turning each line of the riddle into a question, such as:

What is greater than God…nothing.
What is more evil than the devil…nothing.
What do the poor have…nothing.
What do the rich need…nothing.
What happens if you eat nothing…you die.

This I believe is the kind of riddle that could be contained in Forrest’s poem…

But wait!…there’s more…

Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riddle#In_real_life) is much more extensive and tells us that a riddle is:

…a statement or question or phrase having a double or veiled meaning, put forth as a puzzle to be solved. 

Wiki goes on to say:
…riddles have in the past few decades ceased to be part of oral tradition, being replaced by other oral-literary forms…

And then Wiki provides many very concise examples of riddles from various parts of the peopled world, from the Old Testament to Batman. All very fascinating, in my opinion and certainly furthers my interest in looking at Forrest’s poem as a riddle…

Wiki points out that there are two basic types of riddles…Enigmas and Cunundrums. Forrest’s riddle type would most definitely be an enigma.
Enigmas are problems expressed in allegorical language, requiring careful thinking and ingenuity to solve.

If I take the combined definitions from Wiki and BrainDen for “riddle”…I come up with:
A statement having a secret or hidden meaning put forth as a puzzle to be solved.

That certainly seems to sum up our poem. Further, knowing Forrest’s interest in words, word games, history and humor…the literary riddle seems to be right up his alley…

Nothing in any definition of a riddle that I have come across suggests a riddle is any kind of cipher or code.

Riddles have been part of literature for a very long time…

Ancient Sumerians lay claim to this one reputed to be over 4,000 years old:
What house do you enter blind but come out seeing?

Answer: A schoolhouse

In Alice in Wonderland the Mad Hatter asks Alice, how is a Raven like a writing desk?…
J. R. R. Tolkien planted riddles in The Hobbit.
Edgar Allen Poe wrapped riddles into a few of his works.
In Oedipus Rex the monster requires the answer to a riddle before the sojourner can continue.
Plato and Einstein played with riddles…Even Harry Potter contains riddles.

And riddles in poetry go nearly as far back as poetry itself. But there are plenty of modern examples as well. Emily Dickinson loved to riddle in her poems. Her poems were numbered. This is #466.

I dwell in Possibility –
A fairer House than Prose –
More numerous of Windows –
Superior – for Doors –

Of Chambers as the Cedars –
Impregnable of eye –
And for an everlasting Roof
The Gambrels of the Sky –

Of Visitors – the fairest –
For Occupation – This –
The spreading wide my narrow Hands
To gather Paradise –

Emily is describing poetry itself…fairer than prose…a kind of house she can live in.

I know what you’re thinking…so what’s the answer Dal? How did this help you solve the poem?
It hasn’t…but I’ve just started in on this approach.
Here’s how I think I might be able to use it…

Folks have suggested many times over the years that perhaps the clues all refer to the same place…
That could certainly be true in a literary riddle…as in the “nothing” riddle above where one word answers all the questions.

The word that is key which Forrest has referred to could be the answer to all the clues…again, as in the “nothing” riddle above.

It certainly gives me a new license to interpret “Brown”.

Forrest has said over and over that the puzzle of the poem is difficult but not impossible to figure out, and that is certainly what a riddle is…

Begin it in the corner but travel round the world.

 

 

 

The Key Word…Part Nine

yellow

This page is now closed to additional comments. To continue the conversation please go to the most recent “The Key Word” page.

“Many have given serious thought to the clues in the poem but only a few are in tight focus with a word that is key.”

The above is a quote from Forrest. This page is where we can discuss what that key word might be.

 

 

 

Forrest Gets Mail – 24

wi

Hello Mr Fenn,
My oldest son and I who had a rocky relationship due to his choice of wives and her inability  to let me just be a grandparent which cut off communication, began communicating with me because of your poem .

All excited with a “mom I’m obsessed by this”  we have begun communicating regularly about your poem and clues.

In a nutshell Mr Fenn, you have reunited a mother and son.  And hopefully I’ll see my grandkids soon.
I don’t anticipate a relationship with my daughter in law which is fine. Civility for the kids is my wish and we can on that.

I really need to know if the treasure has been located.
We can find other adventures now that we both know we truly love this sort of thing.  He never had any patience as a child or young man so his intentions on this I thought would be short lived. They are not.  He is really ready to go!

Being of little means and less $$, my husband and I took in three grand daughters from our middle son who was an addict. I’m not ready to burn gas from Green Bay WI,  home of the frozen tundra to follow 9 clues to anything.

Thus looking for you to be  honest and it will go no further if the chase must continue even if found for all your fans.   I’d prefer to bark up other trees is all if it has.

You already have me my treasure with getting my son back. But he still wants to find yours. I’ll follow and lead to ends of the earth for him. Just not if the end of the road on this one is a wasted trip.

Thank you for giving of yourself in a very stressful and sad point in your life. I took care of both of my parents as they took their last breaths from lung cancer. I understand the scary part and the can’t take it with you . All we leave here with is who we love and hopefully a piece of ourselves they hold onto.
God bless,
Joanie

——————————

Joanie,
As of this posting the treasure chest is still where I hid it. Good luck to you and your son. f

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forrest Gets Mail – 23


Wolverine

Johnny and Donna were fortunate enough to experience something very rare in the Rockies. I have spent a lot of time there and have never been so lucky, but maybe next time…f

Dear Mr. Fenn,

We returned today from our most recent BOTG and wanted to tell you about a very exciting discovery.  While we were in the wood yesterday morning, Donna and I encountered a fully grown wolverine!  As a wildlife biologist/research scientist, I can assure you that this was an incredible experience…something that is too rare to even consider happening by chance alone.  The Chase put us in the right spot at the right time.  We will cherish  this MARVEL GAZE forever.  Donna found a newspaper article from last year that details the discovery of wolverines in the Wind River Range for the 1st time in over a century.  There is also a short video in the article.  Here’s the link;

https://trib.com/outdoors/male-and-female-wolverines-documented-in-the-wind-river-range/article_2e2cf7e2-a347-5fc0-a0e1-8b731be02514.html

We anticipated being able to go straight to the spot that we’ve had an eye on since last summer to search for Indulgence.  Unfortunately, foot travel became too dangerous and we were forced to turn back after only getting 1/3 of the way across the raging flow.  We are planning to return as soon as conditions improve.

Sincerely,

Johnny & Donna

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Blaze…

yellow

This is the place to discuss the the blaze. What do you think it is? Is it temporary or permanent? Will it be around for a thousand years or doesn’t it matter? Is it easy to spot or difficult? Does the poem tell us what the blaze looks like or what it is?

Nick Lazaredes of SBS-TV’s Dateline in Australia interviewed Forrest in the spring of 2014. Here is Forrest explaining the BLAZE.
https://dalneitzel.com/video/audio/blaze.mp3