Scrapbook Two Hundred Fifty One…

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March 27, 2020

ATTENTION TREASURE HUNTERS

Because of the virus, it is time to rethink the search. In these dire times every logic and street sense says stay at home. Mayors and governors have mandated it, and so has the president. Much of the search areas in all 4 states, are closed. Because so many searchers are out of jobs they want to head out in their car and look for the treasure. I am getting many emails each day that tell me that. Please don’t do it. Hopefully by summer things will be different. Let’s stay at home and wait it out. it is really easy to be sorry, and it lasts a long time. f

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scrapbook Two Hundred Fifty…

snowstorma

March 23, 2020

It’s only sweater time in Santa Fe today, but I think it’s just a ploy that nature sometimes uses to lure unsuspecting searchers into the mountains. I know she’s planning more snow and cold weather. Last week Shiloh and one of his friends made a moonlit climb up to 11,000 feet on the local mountain, and skied down. They froze, and Shiloh’s dog said he didn’t want to do that anymore.

For those whose solve is in the north please know that West Yellowstone is expecting snow tonight and 24 degrees. That’s burr time for everything but polar bears. Let’s think about 1 June for BOTG.

With all that’s going on in this country wisdom told me not to venture outside except to get more firewood and teach Willie what “stay” means. He may be a little retarded in that area. f

 

 

 

 

Speaking of Safety while Searching…

Submitted February 22nd, 2020
by dal

 

I can tell it’s close to spring because I am getting questions from searchers about bears in their search area…and what precautions to take to be safe…

Most of those concerns are about the Yellowstone/Teton area or about the Glacier area.

Since 1979, Yellowstone has hosted over 118 million visits. During this time, 44 people were injured by grizzly bears in the park. For all park visitors combined, the chances of being injured by a grizzly bear are approximately 1 in 2.7 million visits.

That all sounds pretty good unless you are the one in 2.7 million visits…and your chances of being that one person are exactly as good as everyone else’s chance….

However, you can take some precautions to minimize your likelihood of being the one…

I believe the best precaution is to be sensible about where and when you search. It seems unlikely that Forrest, who planned this chase for families and whose intent it was to get kids outside and having fun in the outdoors, would hide the chest in any kind of “dangerous” location…including a known grizzly bear riddled location.

Next, if grizzly bears are known to inhabit the area you are headed into, check with the rangers the day before, or the morning before you search. Ask if there have been any grizzly bear sightings in the area. They will warn you if there have been sightings…then you should reevaluate your plans…

Finally, before you head into any area where bears or lions frequent, make sure you don’t search alone. Make noise while you hike and carry bear spray.

Speaking of bear spray…make sure you know how to use it…
Bear spray is pretty useless tucked away in your pack and not a lot more useful if you have not practiced with it. You need to have armed the can and pressed the trigger once to see how it works before you need it. Then, unarm the can and keep it handy when you hike.

A very bad time to be reading the instructions is when you need to spray a bear…

But safety in the mountains…even in our national parks should be of concern to any searcher. Here are some statistics to get you thinking about safety..

Every year, more than 318 million people visit America’s 419 National Park System sites, including designated National Parks, National Lakeshores, National Monuments, National Historic Sites and National Seashores.

An average of six people die each week in the national park system, a figure that includes accidents like drownings, falls, as well as motor vehicle crashes, natural causes such as heart attacks and suicides. Drowning, automobile accidents, falls and suicides are among the top causes of death at national parks.

And the number one cause is automobile accidents. Folks rarely drive fast in national parks…but they do drive distracted. Running off of the road or crossing into oncoming traffic lanes are common problems in national parks…

So be careful out there…deadly encounters with wildlife are rare…but there are many other ways to hurt or kill yourself in the mountains…

The Boy Scouts have it right…”Be Prepared”!

 

 

 

 

Important Advice From Forrest…

90

SUBMITTED NOVEMBER 21st, 2019
by Forrest

 

It is snowing in Santa Fe on top of 6” that I already have at my house. Willie is crazy out in it. Tomorrow will bring 25 degrees and my ducks are not looking forward to the pond freezing over.

That means it’s time to shut down all searching in the Rockies till next spring or summer. My advice is to get a cup of hot chocolate and watch a good Indiana Jones movie. f

 

 

 

Winter’s Warning 2019…

 

snow

SUBMITTED SEPTEMBER 26th, 2019
by Forrest

 

For those treasure hunters who are searching the northern Rockies, it’s time to hang it up for another season. Please don’t tempt those mountains. One of the things I hate most is to have my feet cold. Burrr, makes me cold just thinking about it. f

https://www.foxnews.com/us/historic-snow-storm-rockies-blizzard-montana-snow-mountains-weather

 

 

 

 

Winter’s Warning 2018…

 

SUBMITTED October 11th, 2018
by Forrest

 

It’s 4 degrees above freezing in Denver and West Yellowstone is under snow. So it’s time to stop searching the northern Rocky Mountains for another season. It was fireplace time for me yesterday morning in Santa Fe, but it warmed nicely by afternoon. This note is just a reminder to everyone that the winter mountains can be terribly unforgiving for those get caught out or go unprepared. If you are still searching please stay weather and mud aware. f

 

 

 

 

Search Prepared…

 

SUBMITTED MAY, 2018
by Forrest

 

Summer is settling in and the Rocky Mountains are beginning to warm up some. The weeds are doing very well in my yard, and the humming bird feeders just outside my kitchen window are busy.

Santa Fe is full of treasure hunters and the Collective Works book store is selling about 35 copies of my books each day.

In the north, Montana, Wyoming, and northern Colorado, snow still covers the ground in many places, and the nights are very cold. Since most schools are out for 3 months, families are headed for the Rockies. Maybe it’s time again to review a few essentials when entering the mountains:

Take a buddy or two with you when you search.

Tell someone where you are going and when you expect to return.

Take plenty of warm clothes, water, food, a GPS, survival gear, and a cell phone. There is no substitute for planning, and please don’t go anywhere an 80-year-old man couldn’t go twice in one afternoon. Good luck, and please stay safe. f

Winter is Here…

 

SUBMITTED NOVEMBER, 2017
by Forrest

 

Snow covers the north end of the Rocky Mountains so it’s time to shut it down for this season. New Mexico and parts of Colorado are still snow free and temps in the 60s. Good hunting, but please don’t search in the snow or mud. And remember, the temps are down in the low 20s in places. f

Has it Been Found?..

SUBMITTED JULY, 2017

 

In July of 2017 Perry Stone pushed out a video on YouTube claiming he had found Forrest Fenn’s treasure hiding spot…not the treasure mind you…just the spot where the treasure was hidden. The chest was not there. So of course Mr. Stone believes that the chest had been found and removed.

These are not unusual claims. I would say there have been a few dozen such claims that I am aware of since Forrest hid Indulgence. A minority have become videos that still float around on YouTube giving the impression that the chest has been found and the chase is finished.

It seems these folks have a difficult time admitting that their solution was wrong and led them to a place where the treasure chest is NOT, instead of where it is. So, rather than admit defeat they often decide that they were correct, but someone else got to the location before them and removed the chest. What is so interesting to me about these claims is that as far as I can tell no two of them are in the same location.

Today, Forrest was asked by a reporter in Denver if Mr. Stone’s claim was true. This is Forrest’s generous response:

I enjoyed Mr. Stone’s well-presented video. He is a far thinker and has a knack for analyzing. There are half a dozen other videos that were made similarly. The treasure remains where I hid it about 7 years ago. It is interesting that the film makers are so positive while leading their viewers to where the treasure chest never was. I compliment all of them and am reminded that it’s all about the thrill of the chase. f

By the way you can view Mr. Stone’s video here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQ5fWkYb708&amp

 

 

 

 

 

 

Safety First…

 

SUBMITTED JUNE, 2017
by Forrest

 

When I said the treasure was not hidden in Utah or Idaho it was my plan not to narrow the search area further. But in the light of a recent accident, and in the interest of safety, I feel it necessary to alter that plan.

The treasure chest is not under water, nor is it near the Rio Grande River. It is not necessary to move large rocks or climb up or down a steep precipice, and it is not under a man-made object.

Please remember that I was about 80 when I made two trips from my vehicle to where I hid the treasure.

Please be cautious and don’t take risks.

My guess is that in the last 7 years more than 250,000 people have searched for the treasure without suffering any serious injuries. I invite you to add your name to that list. The search is supposed to be fun. f