Third Distinguished Flying Cross…

 

SUBMITTED November 11th, 2019
by DAL
6839 grande

Distinguished Flying Cross

Some military awards are handed out like gold stars in an elementary grade school. All you have to do is show up and you can get one…The Good Conduct Medal comes to mind. The Distinguished Flying Cross is not such an award. The DFC is an award of valor presented to airmen who have distinguished themselves in aerial operations. Forrest earned more than one of these during his tour in Vietnam. This is about his third DFC.

dfc copy

The citation for his award reads:
Major Forrest B. Fenn distinguished himself by heroism while participating in aerial
flight as an F-100 pilot in the Delta Region of South Vietnam on 24 August 1968.

On that date, Major Fern, using the call sign limit 52, was flying as wingman and pilot
in a flight of two F-100s on a close air support mission.The target was troops in
close contact and an unknown number of active automatic weapons positions When Limit
51 Flight arrived in the target area, a flight of two F-100s were bombing targets
which were in tree lines on both sides of a small canal. The friendlies had already
marked their positions with red smoke and were located 50, 150, and 200 meters from
the active enemy gun positions.

After one of the F-100 aircraft was hit with automate weapons fire , they departed for home. The forward air controller (FAC) , Andy 76, briefed limit 51 Flight on all aspects of the target including the heavy ground fire and the dangerous proximity of friendly forces.

Because it was not feasible to drop the four M-117 high drag bombs on the targets nearest the friendlies, Major Fenn was instructed by Andy 76 to move 150 meters east and hit the enemy firing from a position on the south side of the canal. The exact target position was described, marked with a white phosphorus rocket, and Major Fenn was cleared in. Although the automatic weapons fire continued from at least three positions, Major Fenn, with total disregard for his own personal safety, delivered two 750 pound bombs from 500 feet which landed precisely on the target destroying the automatic weapons position.

On his next two bomb passes, Major Fern delivered two more 750 pound bombs with equally devastating results on an enemy location just across the canal south of the first target with all bombs expended, he was cleared to move west and strafe the enemy gun location 50 meters from the friendly forces. Because of the seriousness of the tactical situation on the ground, Major Fenn elected to concentrate his strafe in hopes of silencing the guns
that were still active in several positions.

On his first strafe pass, with airspeed in excess of 510 knots, Major Fenn fired a burst of 350 rounds of 20MM high explosive incendiary. Andy 76 reported the fire to be “exactly on target.”

During the pull out Major Fenn felt his aircraft jolt with the impact of three hits in the fuselage. One bullet entered the engine accessory section, starting an oil fire which immediately filled the cockpit with smoke. The other two hits were sustained in the forward fuselage fuel tank causing two small holes and a hole “big enough to put a football in.

After declaring an emergency, Major Fenn turned his crippled F-1OO toward Binh Thuy
Air Base 4O miles to the south. A quick fuel check revealed 4200 pounds total
remaining. However, the forward fuselage tank, which feeds the engine, had lost over
1000 pounds in less than two minutes. Major Fern initiated emergency procedures which
were successful in removing some of the smoke that was burning his eyes. The extreme
critical situation caused by fuel pouring overboard faster than the boost pumps could
replenish the fuel tank prompted Major Fenn to level his aircraft at 6000 feet and
throttle back to reduce fuel consumption.

With 33 miles remaining, the forward fuel tank had depleted to 400 pounds which is 200 pounds below emergency fuel. Although the runway was 4000 feet shorter than is normally required for F-100 operation and realizing that he could not use power required to establish a normal approach, Major Fenn elected to continue in an attempt to save the aircraft. With four miles still remaining, on a straight-in gliding approach, Major Fern called “zero fuel,” and the engine flamed out approximately 1/4 mile from the end of the runway. He realized it would be extremely close, but decided to attempt a “dead stick” landing to save the F-100. Major Fern landed in the first 200 feet of the runway and made an approach end engagement of the BAK-9 barrier to insure that he stayed on the short narrow run-way.

The professionalism exhibited by Major Fenn in an extreme emergency situation
not only dealt the hostile force a devastating blow, but also saved a valuable combat
aircraft. The outstanding heroism and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Major
Fenn reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

JOHN S. RIVERS, Lt Col, USAF
Commander

Forrest’s handwritten note added to the citation:
The Viet Cong blew up the F-100 that night. So much for saving the aircraft!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cutest Pet in the Known Universe Photo Contest…

 

November 2019

IMG 2808s

Willie in the Dish Washer                                                            by Forrest

This is a photo contest that everyone can enter. If you don’t actually own a pet, you could borrow one.

Submit your photo either here or on Jenny’s site. Give it a short caption and a by-line and our razor sharp team of judges will choose the winner..

We’ll post them up for everyone to appreciate as they come in. So the Entry Pages will be updated daily.

This contest is a joint effort between Jenny and Dal

 

    • RULES
      1. One submission per person. You can only submit one photo so please pick your best one.
      2. The photo you enter should be at least 1000 pixels wide so that it’s big enough for us to appreciate in all its glorious detail.
      3. No digital trickery please. You can crop your photo if you’d like, but other than that please don’t tamper with it. Other than cropping it should be the way your camera recorded it. This contest is about sharing a photo of your pet and is not about comparing photoshopping abilities.
      4. If a photo is not suitable for all eyes or appears to be an invasion of someone’s privacy it will not be posted or entered.

       

    • HOW TO ENTER
      1. Send your photo as an attachment in an email to:
         sixer13 at gmaildotcom or dal at lummifilmdotcom as a .jpg file
      2. Subject line of your email should be Photo Contest Entry
      3. Make sure you include a 10 word or less caption for your photo and a by-line. (for instance: “Willy in the Dish Washer” by Forrest. This caption has five words. The by-line is not counted as part of the caption.)
      4. Make sure your entry is sent by the contest closing date/time
      5. Make sure you submit your entry to EITHER Dal or Jenny…NOT BOTH

       

      CLOSING DATE
      The last date to submit your photo entry will be November 20, 2019. After midnight MST on November 20th we will no longer accept entries.

       

      PRIZES
      There will be one overall winner and one prize. The prize will be Forrest’s beautiful book, The Genius of Nicolai Fechin…

      fetchin book 1

      It will be signed and contain an original doodle by Forrest. 

      There may be other…unprized winners in categories such as biggest pet or smallest pet or funniest pet…

       

      JUDGES
      The Judges will be Jenny, Dal, Forrest and Willy
      Judging will take place over the 24hrs following the close of the contest.
      Judges will be looking for the photos that best represent the theme. 
      Two of the judges have a pet, two do not. 
      They will all bring their own unique perspective as to what photo best exemplifies the theme. 
      Their decision will be final and no bribe could possibly be large enough to sway their decision. However you are welcome to try 🙂
      Remember, this contest is about the photo but a great caption will certainly help.

       

      POSTING THE ENTRIES
      Jenny and Dal will post entries as soon as possible after receiving them. They will be made available for all to see on our blogs and remember there are two blogs where different photos are posted…You need to look at both sites to see all the entries. If you have questions about the contest please email Jenny or Dal at their respective emails posted above.

      Please view the entries on Jenny’s site HERE

      Entry Pages:
      Page One 
      Page Two
      Page Three
      Page Four
      Page Five
      Page Six
      Page Seven
      Page Eight
      Page Nine
      Page Ten
      Page Eleven
      Page Twelve
      Page Thirteen

We Shall Not Cease…

abc 1

NOVEMBER 2019
by Brad

 

“We shall not cease from exploration and at the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.”

Why did Forrest Fenn offer us the above quote? At first notion we readily accept that the quote was offered in reference to our search for his hidden treasure and the endless exploring to be endured in that specific pursuit. However, are we really to believe that Forrest Fenn held little regard for the true context of those words in the original author’s writing? 

Perhaps, in order to answer the above question, we need to examine more closely what it might actually be that we are being challenged to explore? No doubt we are being challenged to explore all of the wonders of the Rocky Mountains, there is no questioning this fact. But now let me suggest that we are also being challenged to explore two other equally important things, one of those being life itself, and the last and most important challenge being the exploration of ourselves. These last two, after all, is what T. S. Eliot was exploring when he penned the above words in his writing, Little Gidding. 

What was T. S. Eliot writing about? What was he referencing when he spoke about all of that exploration and what was to be discovered in the end? The end is the beginning, or so it was written, and not just by T. S. Eliot. In Forrest Fenn’s poem we are to begin where warm waters halt and we are to end our quest with the discovery of the blaze, brave and in the wood not coming until later. This is the full extent of our participation according to that poem, Fenn’s last directive being that we listen, and listen good. 

Why are we to listen good? Is it because he is making extra effort to draw out attention to what is really being said? Is it because he is suggesting to us that there is something more to be understood within his poem then what is presented on the surface? 

Below is a painting I did, a new pursuit I’ve recently taken up. I call this little painting, Willie & Me, and I think it sums up the true nature of Fenn’s poem pretty well because he’s done it tired and now he’s weak, and there is that contentment in this simple painting. 

abc2

But there is more to this little painting then what one might see at first glance. The tree is a Juniper tree, a sacred tree at the heart of the Hopi culture. In the distance there is a river, there also exist the hint of a blaze, and there is also two soaring eagles. And there he comfortably stands, with Willie, a moment of absolute contentment.   

“…at the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.”

If you have not read Little Gidding then perhaps you should as you just might discover more content within that writing that seems to resonate with Fenn’s poem and the chase. I know I did. And so I’ll continue to explore and to discover until one day I can say, in complete contentment, that I’ve also done it tiered and now I’m weak. 

With open mind, with great imagination, I’ll keep exploring and discovering. Next year I have Wyoming in my sights and I plan to take my camera, fly rod, and now also a canvas and easel. The thrill of the chase, maybe we’ve just got to embrace it for what it can be, the journey of a lifetime. 

Have I got it all figured out? For me, anyway, I have. Now then, I gotta go because I have a date with a paint brush…… 

Man Alone (Brad)  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Be Water…

of34October 2019

By CrazyFox

 

Boots on the ground (BOTG) was always the fun part for me.  I don’t know how many searches I’ve been on and it never really mattered if I was even close to the treasure or even in the right state.  It was all just an excuse to get out in the wilderness and hike around and explore new areas and have some fun pretending I was going to find the treasure.  But eventually I had to stop doing that because it got to be an expensive hobby and I couldn’t afford to just keep driving around the Rocky Mountains on a wild goose chase looking for gold, no matter how much fun I was having.  But the poem had become stuck in my mind, playing over and over in an endless loop, even when I was hiking outside the Rockies.  Somehow I had become obsessed.  The more I thought about it, the more I thought that it was a crazy idea that Forrest even hid a treasure valued that high somewhere out there.  I mean what if someone accidentally stumbled across it and found it without even having any knowledge of the poem.  Or what if a park ranger in Yellowstone found it and then what…the government takes it?  I would think that would be the last thing that Forrest would want to happen.  So, at some point I had a shift in my thinking.  I began to think that maybe the treasure chest wasn’t actually hidden out there in the mountains and that maybe the poem was just a riddle to be solved mentally.  Does that sound crazy?  Anyhow, this solve is a mental solve only, using imagination.  All I ask is that you read my solution with an open mind because my solve is pretty far out there.  After almost a decade, still no one has found the chest with traditional thinking…with BOTG mentality.  So, I’m thinking outside the box.  Way outside the box.

Forrest used the word “good” in the poem, instead of using the more grammatically correct “well”.  Is there some reason we have to be good?  Forrest spent a long time writing the poem and I’m sure he chose every word carefully, and if he used the word good instead of well, then I’m sure it must have meaning in the poem.  The treasure chest is said to have possibly once contained a bible, so maybe there is a connection to the word good and maybe morality plays a role in the poem.  In The Thrill of the Chase (TTOTC), Forrest mentions Catcher in the Rye in the chapter titled “Important Literature”.   Forrest thinks the book is about him and says that it was “my very own story line”.  The title Catcher in the Rye comes from a song that the main character hears and misinterprets.  Holden (the main character) wants to “catch” children in their uncorrupted innocence before they “fall” into adulthood, or in other words to protect innocence from the corrupting influence of experience.  So is there a “fall” in Forrest’s poem?  A fall from grace and Forrest wants to be the “catcher”?  “And take it in the canyon down”…that canyon leads to hell!  In Forrest’s poem we have the line, “There’ll be no paddle up your creek”, which to me, sounds like we may be in trouble…we’re going to be up sh-t creek without a paddle (because of our sinful ways…we have fallen).  

In Important Literature, Forrest doesn’t really care for The Great Gatsby, a cautionary tale with themes of decadence and excess.  And when Forrest talks about For Whom the Bell Tolls, he’s describing a completely different book.  Death is the primary theme in For Whom the Bell Tolls and is the primary theme of Forrest’s poem in my opinion.  In Forrest’s poem he writes “the end is ever drawing nigh”.  That line always sounded a little ominous to me.  I think he’s talking about the end of life.  We have the double omega at the end of the book.  Omega means the end so the double omega would mean the end of the end…or a new beginning.  In my solution, the first omega (or the first end) represents a spiritual death and the second omega represents a physical death.  On page 15 in TTOTC, forrest says “that before too long I’ll make my last flight to where even memory itself will never have been”…the last flight, meaning death and his spirit flying up to heaven.  On page 142 he writes, “Today I looked up in the sky and saw that I shall never die”, meaning that the physical body may die but the spirit lives on in the afterlife.  

The quote that Forrest mentions from the T.S. Eliot poem says, “We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time”.  Basically the quote is saying that we are going to end where we start.  But how can that be?  Are we going in a circle?  Yes, two circles.  Two cycles.  Two omegas.

I started out by looking for the blaze first because that’s the trail marker.  That puts you on the correct path.  “Begin it where warm waters halt” is not the beginning of the poem.  We need to start at the beginning of the poem where the keyword is located in the first stanza.  He tells you that he’s giving you a hint, in the line…And hint of treasures new and old.  The keyword is old.  Start out by looking for the blaze…just heavy loads and water high…that’s the blaze.  It’s not a waterfall, that’s the wrong direction…your arrowhead should be pointing up!  When Forrest fell from the sky after being shot down, he was saved by being pulled up.  That’s the direction you want to go after you die…up, not down to hell! 

As I have gone alone in there

And with my treasures bold

I can keep my secret where

And hint of riches new and old

The keyword is old.  He’s talking about Old Faithful in this first stanza.  Don’t think of “I” as meaning Forrest speaking to you, think of “I” as Old Faithful speaking to you.

As I (Old Faithful) have gone (erupted-the water is gone, it has left the chamber) alone in there

And with my treasures bold (This is the blaze, the water in full display-the eruption).

I can keep my secret where warm waters halt (which is in the clouds, or in heaven).

New and old…new eruptions, old eruptions. 

Okay, I guess I need to explain WWWH (where warm waters halt).  Hot water comes out of Old Faithful and most of the water falls back down, except for the finite particles (the steam or the mist) which rises due to temperature.  The mist is the warm waters, which rise until they reach the colder air high up in the sky.  That’s where warm waters halt and clouds are formed.  The clouds represent heaven and the mist represents a spirit that reconnected spiritually with God.  More on that later.  We need to start at the beginning of the path.  So we begin it WWWH, or in other words, in heaven.  We start in heaven and God gives us life to begin. 

And take it in the canyon down (ATIITCD).  Those of you who are familiar with the searcher who goes by the name Seeker, may remember Him talking about “take it in” to mean view.  So we take in the view.  We have to view the path, that is, we have to visualize the path in our mind’s eye only (imagination) since the path takes us underground.  And we’re going to take it (the water cycle of Old Faithful) into the canyon down.  Water is a symbol of life across many different cultures.  So in the poem, life is symbolized by the water which I’ve already pointed out by saying that the mist is symbolic of a spirit going to heaven.  So as the rain (or snow) comes down, this is the “fall”.  As we go through life, we fall into sin, because let’s face it, we’re all sinners.  

Not far, but too far to walk.  Hell is too far to walk, and we won’t be walking at all since this is a mental solve, no BOTG needed.

Put in below the home of Brown.  The home of Brown is Earth.  Earth is not capitalized when preceded by “the” – for example, everything on the earth, as opposed to everything on Earth (with no “the”).  The poem doesn’t say put in below the home of the brown.  That’s why he capitalized Brown.  So the canyon down, is below Earth.  In TTOTC on page 48, Forrest says after washing dishes all day… “My hands turned white and had deep canyons in them”.  So the canyon is small, or starts off small, just a little crevice where the water seeps down underground.

I’ve made a rudimentary drawing to help you visualize my solve.

Map2

So what I’m saying is that the poem takes us through two water cycles of Old Faithful.  These two cycles are the double omegas.  From there it’s no place for the meek.  So the water seeps down the crevice (the canyon down) and into the chest.  So, we’re at the gates of Hell (the magma chamber) now, and that’s just too far to walk!!!

The end is ever drawing nigh.  So it’s a cycle that repeats itself over and over and we continue to sin and put ourselves in Hell.  We need to break the cycle!!!  That’s why Forrest used the word “good” in the poem instead of using “well”.  We have to be good unless we want to end up in Hell!!!

There’ll be no paddle up your creek.  That’s the constrictor that the water is forced through.  So basically we’re going to be up sh-t creek without a paddle if we don’t change our evil ways!!!

Just heavy loads and water high.  This is the eruption of Old Faithful.  Water is spewing everywhere like the tears we’ll be crying from a life of sin.  We hit rock bottom because of our immoral ways and there’s only one way to go from here…UP!  Water high…meaning WWWH…we’ve had a spiritual death and now we reconnect with God.  

If you’ve been wise and found the blaze.  Wise, because we need to see the error of our ways before we die and end up in Hell.  Look quickly down your quest to cease.  This is the start of the water cycle again for the second omega, or the rest of our lives, hopefully by now, living a more spiritual life.  I think the second omega represents our physical death.

But tarry scant.  So now we are in between eruptions.  We’re down in the water chamber (the chest) and we have to wait a while but not too long, for the water to fill up the chest again and for the eruption to happen.  We don’t want to tarry down in Hell.

With marvel gaze.  So is the marvel gaze hell?  From TFTW (Too Far To Walk)  I believe the last chapter is about the marvel gaze.  He’s looking into the mirror at a younger version of himself and in the mirror poem on page 259 he’s not happy with the looks of his old age (hell) and he asks the mirror to change his looks to twenty-three, his ideal age (heaven).  Then in the mirror poem he says “Maybe we can compromise, If you’ll just make me forty-four” (the middle…between heaven and hell).  So the marvel gaze would be the eruption itself (the blaze).  So we’re down in hell again because we’re all prone to making mistakes.  But this time we just tell the devil to go squat in a cactus patch and get the hell out of there!  

Just take the chest and go in peace.  This is the second eruption or the second omega (our physical death).  The double omega means the end of the end…or a new beginning.  We die a physical death but our spirit travels up to heaven!  Hallelujah!

So why is it that I must go and leave my trove for all to seek?  The answer/s I already know I’ve done it tired and now I’m weak.  So we know why Old Faithful erupts and after every eruption it is “weak” until it fills with water again and the cycle continues.  Plus, Old Faithful is slowing down…it’s not quite as faithful as it used to be.  Is that what’s happening in today’s world…we’re not quite as faithful as we used to be?  I’m not a religious person ( I don’t use the Bible to connect with God) but I am a spiritual person and I connect with a higher power through meditation.

We all know that war is hell.  And it’s possible that Forrest views war as a sin.  In “My War For Me” (in TTOTC), on pages 81 and 82, Forrest writes about a mission where he comes across a large group of people and he has to decide if it’s a legitimate target or not.  He describes the utter chaos, the panic, the terrible fear of the people below him.  Forrest said he felt ashamed and started crying in his oxygen mask.  He says, “Suddenly, I hated Lyndon Johnson and Robert McNamara and all of the other politicians who were sitting in their fat offices at home, totally oblivious to what war was really like.  I think war was a spiritual death to Forrest.  

So hear me all and listen good, your effort will be worth the cold.  Of course we can all hear when Old Faithful erupts and you already understand now why he used the word good instead of well in the poem.  And worth the cold, of course, is where warm waters halt…up in Heaven. 

If you are brave and in the wood…well, I have to be brave to write something as outrages as this!  And this seems to be the place to post it.  Home of Dal is in the wood because that’s where Forrest’s posts all his Scrapbooks.  

I give you title to the gold…this of course…To the Gold… is the title of Forrest’s poem.  What do you all think?

-CrazyFox

  

 

 

 

 

 

Art of the Chase…

pantbb

OCTOBER 2019
by Sacha

 

I had to share this with you.

sachapaintIt is a painting, made by Rick’s grandson, Eli. Eli is 6 years old.

This is Eli’s very first painting.  On the left is Rick, and on the right is Eli.  They are both holding shovels.  Between them is a tree.  Below the tree is a red box.  According to Eli, that is “the” treasure.

Jason and I were on a video call with Rick when Eli came into the room to share his first masterpiece with his papa.

It is amazing how children can view life in such simple terms.

I asked Rick if I can borrow Eli for my next BOTG. He has this thing figured out.

Sacha

image1 1

Rick added this new photo of Eli’s painting and the following comment about it:

When I took the picture Eli was signing the painting, I guess he wasn’t done signing it because he added the 6 to it after I took the picture for Sacha.


Sacha Johnston is a long time searcher.
She has a YouTube Channel devoted to the search.

Rick is IllinoisGho$t and has both a Blog and a YouTube Channel.

By the way…Eli is auctioning his one-of-a-kind artwork of eBay. Monies go directly to his college fund…Click HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emailing Forrest?…Please be Considerate…

 

SUBMITTED OCTOBER 25th, 2019
by DAL

 

0T1A3929

I recently spent a couple of days with Forrest in Santa Fe. We had an opportunity to chat about many things. First off I want to say that Forrest is in good health but both his hearing and his vision are weakening. Additionally, Peggy is frail. but in good spirits. Forrest spends much of his time caring for and attending to Peggy. 

At this point in his life the 200 emails per day that searchers feel compelled to write him are, by and large, a distraction from more important duties. He uses a magnifying glass to read his email. As you can imagine, it takes a significant amount of time to get through email that way.

What Forrest wants…and needs…is to receive fewer emails, from you, from me…from searchers everywhere. Believe it when I say that there are some searchers who write Forrest several times each day…with nothing more than idle chit-chat. He told me that this has become quite tedious.

Other searchers send him their solutions, hoping for a response that will verify or nullify their ideas. Forrest will never answer such emails with remarks that could support or thwart any solution. To do so would be to give the sender information that no one else has. He refuses to do that. So, sending Forrest a solution is pointless.

If you have the chest in your possession, Forrest certainly wants to know that…you can remain anonymous. He has no desire to know who found it. If you find the chest there will be ample ways to prove that you have it without disclosing your identity and Forrest looks forward to that information.

I realize that it is difficult to believe that I am speaking about these things with any authority from Forrest. But Forrest asked me to post this note to everyone in hopes that we would all cut back on sending unimportant email…

In the past Forrest has announced twice that he would be cutting back on responses to email. Those announcements never affected the number of emails he received. This is a third attempt to cut down the number of emails he receives.

It would be easy for him to just hit the delete button on any email he does not want to read…but the problem is…the email he deletes without reading may be important…so he reads most…

The solution to this problem is not for Forrest to read fewer emails…but rather, for us to respect his wishes and send less…self edit…be aware of his need to spend less time at his computer.

I think we can do that…

Sincerely,

-dal

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visiting CWB…

cwbbanner
October 2019

By Chris Wilson

 

October 22nd, 2019 2pm, Collected Works Bookstore

Today was an amazing day. Without going too much into background, one of my two young daughters has autism and cannot yet communicate properly. It is also very difficult to go out in public with her because of the frequent outbursts and other quirks. Yesterday I brought my family to Santa Fe from Kansas with my Dad for the first time.

When we arrived I emailed Forrest to see if we could meet and see if he would sign my book. He replied and suggested we meet at 2pm at Collectied Works Bookstore.

cwb

We arrived a few minutes early to scope the place out, but by this time we were having a really hard time with our daughter. We took her outside on the back patio area of the bookstore to calm her down but weren’t having any luck at all. I could see my wife really stressed out, and the situation just felt helpless in that moment because we knew Forrest was coming soon. Then only a moment later Forrest pulled up in his Jeep, walked straight over to us after confirming who I was, and took my daughter by the hand.

He could see that we were having a hard time, I briefly explained her condition and he said “she’s a beautiful girl I’ll hold her hand!” and continued to walk into the bookstore with her.

From there I was able to introduce Forrest to my wife, two children and Father. He grabbed a table just for us and asked everyone to sit down. We talked for nearly 30 minutes! He discussed all sorts of things with us! It was absolutely surreal I couldn’t stop smiling!

PSX01

Before leaving he very kindly signed a few copies of our TTOTC books, and my copy of “Journal of a Trapper” which was signed “I love Osborne Russel”.
As we said our goodbyes he came back up to my daughter and gave her a high-five. I was so thankful his presence brought her the comfort we had been trying to achieve since earlier that morning.

20191022 161702

20191022 161646

It made my whole trip to see Forrest Fenn in person telling stories, and playing with my daughters. Meeting him only confirmed what I already felt in my heart, which is that Forrest is as genuine as a man could possibly be. I’m richer just from the experience of meeting him face to face.

Forrest, thank you for making time for us and for being so kind to my family, we won’t forget it. 🙂

-Chris

Chris’s videos can be found on YouTube under “Octopus Skcid”.
https://youtu.be/P5LtOywcNQ4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Litter 81 Found……

image1aOctober 2019

By Chris LaFrieda, PhD

Photographs by Digby Greenhalgh and Kai Chang

 

Introduction by Forrest Fenn
Christopher LaFrieda is a treasure hunter by hobby and a designer and maker of microchips when he is not thinking about WWWH. His PhD is in electrical engineering. He was studying my life looking for clues when he became interested in my Vietnam experience, especially the story about me being shot down. Before my mind could catch up with what he was doing, he was looking for my crashed F-100, deep in the Laotian Jungle. Yeah Chris, good luck with that one. This is his story. f


It’s still morning here in New Jersey, but it’s just past 11 p.m. in Laos. I should have heard from Digby and Kai by now. Communicating with my team in Sepon has been a constant struggle. There’s only a small window of time to arrange a call before they turn in for the night, exhausted from the long day spent in the extreme heat and humidity of the Laotian jungle. If that fails, then there’s an eight-hour wait to try again in their a.m. Today is different though.

This was our last shot to find the wreckage of a missing Vietnam-era warplane, an F-100D with serial number 55-3647. The pilot, who safely ejected and was rescued by helicopter over 50 years ago, is home in Santa Fe, New Mexico eagerly awaiting news of its fate. We’ve been growing increasingly confident about finding it over the past few days. I wouldn’t know how to break it to him if we are unsuccessful. I’m also starting to worry about my guys.

The United States dropped approximately 300 million bombs on Laos during the Vietnam War. About a third of those never went off and they continue to maim and kill to this day. The area around Sepon, where we are operating, is one of the most contaminated in all of Laos. Local guides will try to steer my team around unexploded ordnance, but much of it is hidden beneath the surface and you wouldn’t know it’s there until it’s too late. Oh, then there are the tigers.

Kai translates, “The boy says he saw a footprint the size of an open hand. That means the tiger is as big as a water buffalo.” They seemed to feel better when one of the guides offered to bring his AK-47 with them into the jungle. That only made me more nervous. The locals say not to bother worrying about tigers because the giant poisonous centipedes are the real danger. How did I get myself into this mess?

You may have heard that there is a treasure chest filled with gold hidden somewhere in the Rocky Mountains. In 2010, Forrest Fenn hid the chest with the hope that it would motivate people to “get off the couch” and experience nature. Forrest wrote a poem that contains clues to the location of the treasure and published it in his memoir, The Thrill of the Chase. In addition to the poem, Forrest teases that his memoir contains “subtle clues” hidden among its stories.

After nearly a decade, nobody has found the treasure. That’s just the sort of challenge that I can’t resist, so last year I picked up a copy of Forrest’s memoir. Its stories cover 80 years of Forrest’s life from his first steps at the beginning of the Great Depression right up to the time he hid the treasure. All the stories are fascinating, but one perfectly sums up Forrest’s special brand of luck and adventure—his rescue after being shot down as a fighter pilot during the Vietnam War.

image2 On December 20, 1968, Major Fenn was leading a flight of four F-100Ds under the call sign Litter 81. As part of Operation Commando Hunt, their mission was to drop ordnance on the main road leading into Tchepone, Laos (now known as Sepon) to disrupt the movement of North Vietnamese troops and equipment along the Ho Chi Minh Trail. As Forrest made his passes over the target, his F-100 was hit and severely damaged by anti-aircraft fire. Rather than immediately heading for safe ground, Forrest charged the guns and marked them as targets for the rest of his flight (an act that earned him the Silver Star).

Forrest pulled away from the guns and, as instructed, took a heading of 030 for bailout. His plane held together long enough to get him to a remote stretch of jungle, about 20 miles away from the action, before he ejected. As Forrest descended in his parachute, he watched his F-100 crash into a distant cliff and explode in a giant fireball. After spending a harrowing night in the jungle and narrowly avoiding capture, his Forward Air Controller (FAC), James Swisher, found him the next morning and alerted rescue forces.

One Crown C-130, two Jolly Green HH-3Es, two Misty F-100Fs, four Sandy A-1s, and one Nail O-2 with a total crew of 26 all worked quickly to rescue the downed pilot. The Jolly Green helicopters, one low and one high (a backup), took their positions over Forrest, hoisted him out of the jungle, and ferried him safely to their base at Nakhon Phanom, Thailand. As was typical for the time, Forrest was given just a few moments for a photo op and to thank some of his rescuers before they all continued with the business of war. Forrest had the distinction of being the 1,500th combat save in Southeast Asia.
image3 1There was something about the rescue that puzzled me. Forrest was out of radio contact with his flight and rescue forces for about 14 hours. A cursory study of rescue operations from that era suggested that was an anomaly. Usually, a doomed aircraft would be escorted by a wingman through bailout. The wingman would then orbit near the downed pilot until rescue forces arrived, while maintaining constant radio contact with the survivor. In Forrest’s case, he had somehow been separated from the rest of his group and lost, then found the next day.  There had to be more to this story.

With the help of a retired Air Force historian, George Cully, I obtained mission reports from each of the units involved in the rescue. The full picture started coming into focus, but there were details that I would only learn after tracking down James Swisher, the FAC who found Forrest.

Wisher explained, “We [the FACs] were given a heading of 300 for bailouts in the morning briefing. Forrest ended up on a heading of 030, 90 degrees off. He punched up through a break in the clouds and we lost sight of him.” (It’s not clear where the incorrect heading came from, but Swisher’s account makes sense because 030 is toward North Vietnam.) Swisher assumed Forrest turned to 300 and they spent the first day looking for him in the wrong place. Early the next morning, Swisher returned with a pair of Misty F-100s (same plane as Forrest) and sent them along Forrest’s last known trajectory. When they cleared the mountains that were blocking Forrest’s transmissions, he came up on the radio.

“If I was 500 feet above where my chute is hanging in the trees,
I could point to where the plane crashed.”

In April of this year, I visited Forrest at his home in Santa Fe to discuss these newly found details about his rescue. Forrest sang my praises, “Chris is a ferret. I was looking for Swisher for 50 years and he found him in two weeks.” (It was closer to two months.) We spent the next couple of days poring over his collection of Vietnam memorabilia, which included a handwritten log of every mission he flew, his parachute beeper, combat maps, photo albums and letters. The pièce de résistance was a photograph taken by Roger Gibson, the copilot of the backup chopper, just as Forrest was being hoisted up out of the jungle.

At first glance, the photo appears to show only a lush green jungle surround by magnificent stone cliffs. Upon careful inspection, a tiny camouflaged helicopter can be seen nestled in the treetops. As Forrest held the photograph, he told me that in the 1970s, a filmmaker wanted to bring him back to Laos to find the wreckage of his airplane. “I was going to find the flight stick from my F-100 and bring it home. That would have been some trophy.” Forrest raised his hand slightly and closed his eyes as if he could see himself holding that piece of his airplane. For a moment, I thought I could see it too.

The project eventually fell through and it was clear that the passing decades did little to assuage Forrest’s disappointment. Forrest continued to regale me with stories about his tour in Vietnam, but my mind kept drifting back to the thought of finding his airplane. Fifty years had passed. Could it still be out there? I was confident that with the rescue photo and mission reports, I could find the exact spot where Forrest was pulled from the jungle. However, Forrest was the only person to see where his plane crashed. If there was any chance to find it, we’d have to rely on half-century-old memories to get us the rest of the way.

Over the next few weeks, I peppered Forrest with questions about his bailout. I did my best to disguise my intentions because I didn’t want to be the second person to get his hopes up and then shatter them. Forrest was able to recall that he was flying parallel to a cliff wall and that his plane crashed halfway up a distant cliff wall, approximately one minute after ejection. That reduced the search area to a series of cliffs about 3-4 miles from the extraction point. There was still too much ground to cover, so I tried to press him further. That’s when Forrest said, “If I was 500 feet above where my chute is hanging in the trees, I could point to where the plane crashed.” I suspect that was Forrest’s polite way of changing the subject, but it gave me an idea.

At age 88, Forrest wasn’t going to travel to Laos and fly around in a helicopter looking for wreckage. Fortunately, technology could provide an alternative. Forrest’s extraction point is roughly 13 miles north of Sepon, Laos on lands that belong to the Village of Ban Talouay. Satellite images show a clearing in the jungle about 1 mile east from the extraction point. If we can get permission from the village and if we could make it to the clearing, then we could send up a drone, get footage from Forrest’s parachute perspective, show it to Forrest and, hopefully, get a fix on the crash site. That’s a lot of ifs, and there really was no we yet, but the idea was technically sound.

I needed to assemble a team that included a translator, drone pilot and local guides. Due to the remoteness and rugged terrain of the area, it seemed logical to enlist the help of a travel agency that specializes in motorcycle tours of Laos. I reached out to James Barbush, an American expat living in Laos, and explained the situation. James runs Remote Asia Travel with his wife Quynh, and he personally has years of off-roading experience at remote locations in Laos, including near Sepon. James would serve as a one-stop shop of sorts. He recruited the required personnel, handled the equipment rentals, made the travel arrangements, and applied for all the necessary permits. The only caveat was that rainy season had just begun, and they’d have to wait for a break in the weather to proceed. The short delay gave me an opportunity to become acquainted with my team.

Kai Chang would act as translator and guide for this expedition. Kai is Laotian and speaks both Lao and English fluently. He’s worked for James as a motorcycle tour guide for over five years and led many weeks-long tours across the rough backroads of Laos. Over the years, Kai has developed contacts at many of the remote Laotian villages, including Ban Talouay.

Digby Greenhalgh is our drone pilot. Originally from Australia, Digby has lived in Hanoi for almost two decades. His company, Explore Indochina, provides motorcycle adventure tours across Laos and Vietnam. He has been exploring the Ho Chi Minh Trail by motorcycle for the past 17 years and has ridden the trail over 25 times. Digby has been featured on several television shows, including The World’s Most Dangerous Roads and Top Gear. More recently, Digby has been using drones to explore parts of the trail that are too dangerous to get to on foot.

After weeks of daily thunderstorms, the weather improved marginally to intermittent rain. It was decision time. James advised, “Go for it. Wait it out in Sepon and hit your weather windows as you can.” Digby seemed to concur, “The only way to know will be to stick our hands out the window in Sepon.” I brought Forrest up to speed and asked him to be ready to review the drone footage. Slightly stunned, he responded, “This is exciting, Chris. I’ll do what I can.” There was no backing out now. We were a go.

On the morning of June 11, Digby and Kai departed from Vientiane on motorcycle. The 400-mile trek to Ban Talouay was impeded by poor road conditions and the occasional downpour. They arrived at the village the following day and arranged a meeting with the naiban (village chief). Armed with a photograph of Forrest, Kai, speaking in Lao, relayed the story of Forrest’s rescue and his desire to find the remains of his missing F-100. The naiban was sympathetic. Not only did he grant access to their lands, but he also arranged for three hunters from a neighboring village to serve as guides. Their chat was followed by friendly carousing and storytelling into the night.

The naiban has lived in the village his entire life. During the Vietnam War, when he was just a boy, the village was moved farther up into the valley, not far from where Forrest spent the night in the jungle. The naiban revealed that there were Vietnamese bases throughout the area—a fact that underscored how fortunate Forrest was to escape capture. The North Vietnamese fed and looked after the villagers, and in return the villagers helped them. After being on opposite sides of such a brutal and devastating war, the naiban had readily offered us his assistance. In a way, I felt this expedition was already a success.

Early the next day, Kai and Digby regrouped at the naiban’s house for a quick introduction to their guides, Su, Noob and Don. The five men crowded onto three motorcycles and started up the dirt road at the west side of the village. The rocky narrow road cuts a swath through an overgrown jungle that occasionally blocks out the sky above them. They followed the road over streams and rain-filled depressions, passing through a bamboo gate, and eventually reaching its end at a dry creek bed, about 3 miles into the valley. They parked their bikes and continued on foot.

Over the next half mile, the creek bed turns into a stream, then into a full-fledged gorge with sheer stone walls as it squeezes between two mountains. The crew navigated the meandering path as the rocks beneath their feet grew from stones to boulders. Just past the narrowest section of gorge, the grade quickly lessens and the stone walls crumble, yielding to the jungle environment. The guides escorted the group up a steep trail to a hilltop clearing.

“They sometimes go up there to hunt.
There are plane parts along the base of the cliff.”

The clearing offers a unique 360-degree view of the entire jungle valley, which is surrounded by a C-shaped mountain range with 1,000-foot-high stone bluffs. Waist-high and shoulder-high crops with long narrow stalks cover sections of the clearing. Digby inquired, “Kai, can you ask the guys what they planted here?” Kai translated, “They say the tall plants are exported to China or Vietnam to make fiber for clothes. The smaller one, the people use it to make a roof for their house.” The guides further explained that the villagers cleared out the trees just two years ago. Prior to that, our expedition wouldn’t have been possible.

Digby laid out his equipment and prepped the drone for launch. The cliffs in the rescue photo perfectly matched the cliffs to the west of their position; Digby knew exactly where he needed to go. He piloted the drone a mile out to precisely where Forrest broke through the jungle canopy, climbed to 500 feet and scanned the mountains on the far side. With the remaining battery, Digby made a pass along the western side of the bluffs and then hightailed it back to the clearing. He checked the drone footage and made an exciting discovery.

From what seems to have been Forrest’s vantage point during bailout, the surrounding terrain masks all but one 700-foot-long section of distant cliffs—it was the only place that fit his description of the crash site. Digby signaled for the guides to come over and pointed out the location on a map. They became animated and started talking over each other. Kai summarized, “They sometimes go up there to hunt. There are plane parts along the base of that cliff. They say that is where the plane crashed.”

This crash site is one of several nearby sites that are known to the villagers. They normally don’t advertise the locations of these sites, but they felt compelled to after we made the connection. Over the years, these sites were stripped of most of their metal to support construction booms in Vietnam and China. Only small fragments or non-metallic items remain. The guides cautioned that the three-hour hike to the crash site would be difficult, but they were willing to take Kai out there the next day. Kai agreed and the group retraced their steps back to Ban Talouay.

That night, back at the hotel, Digby updated Forrest and me on the recent developments and sent us some drone footage to review. Forrest confirmed, “That is exactly as I remember it.” We planned to have Kai take two cell phones to the crash site and photograph every piece of wreckage with emphasis on anything with a serial number. We scheduled a call for 9 p.m. the following night. Kai should be back before then. That gave me a day to figure out how to identify an airplane from small parts.

Fortunately, the National Archives hosts a database of all aircraft losses during the Vietnam War with their last known coordinates. Those records show that 183 planes were lost within 30 miles of the crash site. Only four of those planes, including Forrest’s, were F-100s. Forrest ejected 3 miles from the crash site. The other F-100s were reported to have crashed or exploded at least 15 miles away. If the wreckage is from an F-100, then there would be no doubt that we found Forrest’s plane.

In my collection of F-100 materials, I had a copy of a technical manual named Illustrated Parts Breakdown. That manual contains a complete list of the F-100’s more than 30,000 parts. If we find any serial numbers belonging to an F-100, they’ll be in there. I placed the manual next to the phone on my desk. I was ready. All I could do now was wait.

A little after 11 p.m. Laos time, the phone rings.

“Mr. Chris” a voice beams with an Australian accent that I’ve become accustomed to. “Yes, Mr. Digby,” I returned, sensing the incoming good news. “Tell Forrest to break out the bubbly, we found Litter 81.” An elated Digby and Kai recount the events of that day…

That morning, Kai rendezvoused with the guides at Ban Talouay and, this time, they rode off on the trail at the northern side of the village. Near the end of the trail, they ditched the bikes and headed northeast into the jungle on a barely visible footpath. After a short walk, the jungle opens at a hidden rice paddy packed with green shoots and dotted with burnt tree stumps, a byproduct of slash-and-burn. They continued along a stream at the northern end of the paddy.

The stream grows in size and intensity as they near its source—a small waterfall flowing over a stone ledge and into a pool of clear water. The last mile of the journey is a steep 1,300-foot climb up the mountain. Stone slabs form a natural staircase and exposed roots act as handholds to aid the group as they ascend. After an exhausting two-hour climb, they reached a relatively flat tree-covered ridge at the base of 1,000-foot-high stone cliffs.

On site, there were no obvious signs of wreckage. The guides grabbed some flat rocks to use as makeshift shovels and began excavating through leaves and topsoil from a squat position. They uncovered tire fragments, bits of aluminum, fuel cell bladders, wires, hoses and screws. Kai carefully scraped the dirt off the parts with his fingers and photographed each item, making sure to capture any serial numbers.

On the return trip, the guides stopped to bathe in the pool at the small waterfall before returning to the village. Ban Talouay was alive with singing and dancing. Neighboring villages had joined in the festivities and they were feasting on a large pig that was spit roasted over an open fire. It was a wedding! Kai said his goodbyes to our new friends and made his way back to the hotel.

As I listened to the story, I felt an adrenaline rush come over me. It quickly turned to panic as I began to worry: What if we found the wrong plane? I needed to research those plane parts ASAP.

The tire fragments are from a Goodyear size 3.0 x 8.8 tire with a ply rating of 22. They match only one type of aircraft with losses in Laos, the F-100. Hose assembly #601335-8-0104 is from the hydraulic oil pump attached to the F-100 engine. Similarly, all the other identifiable parts are a match to the F-100. We did it. We found Litter 81.

Weeks later, a package arrived. I can’t say how, but a small piece of aluminum, vibrating with the spirit of Litter 81, made its way down the mountain and traveled halfway around the world to get to me. I padded a small wooden box, placed the metal bit inside, closed the lid and shipped it to Santa Fe. Shortly after, I received an email from Forrest:
“You are an absolute genius. That fragment is so beautiful. Words cannot describe how I feel about this little thing, Chris. It is a real part of me now. Thank you so much. 
Forrest”

 

Additional Photos:

image12

Leaving Ban Talquay

image7

Ride up the Valley

image8

The gorge narrows

image9

Digby hauls drone equipment out of the gorge

image10

Kai (right)and hunters at the clearing

image11

Digby retrieves his drone

image5

Rescue site in 1968

image4

Rescue site today

image6

Crash site at distant cliff topcezter) as seen from drone

image16

A hidden rice paddy

image19

Su crosses a stream the easy way

image18

The waterfall pool

image17

Noob scales the stone staircase

image13

Cliffs at crash site

image14

Fragments from Goodyear tire, size 30 x 8.8, 22ply

image15 2

Hose assembly #601335-8-0104

image20 2

Fuel cell bladder

image21

Test reads: “CLOSED” “OPEN” POSITION

 

Videos:

Digby and Kai at the clearing:

 

Drone footage from extraction site (no audio):

 

Hike to crash site / wreckage:

 

 

 

 

 

Trying To Read Between The Lines…

bbyt
October 2019

By James Collier

 

Trying To Read Between The Lines

For this solve, I tried to keep things relatively simple. One day, about a month or so ago I was reading some replies on Dal’s blog. The discussion was in reference to some of the things Forrest Fenn has said in the past, as well as the 200ft and 500ft quote. I began to wonder why people were able to get within 200ft and 500ft of the TC, but not realize they were so close. How!? In almost 10 years, and the countless amount of searching, on top of the amount of people who have had very intellectual ideas, why has it not been found? So, I began to think. I sat around for an entire afternoon and asked myself the following questions:

 

1.How did people get so close and not realize it?
2.Why did FF tell people if you didn’t read anything else in the book, read “My War For Me.”
3.Why did ff tell a kid when asked if he thought a kid could solve it, “Yes, quite possibly one of the “smart” ones.”
4.Why did he say that “telling people when he found the location” would be too revealing of a clue?
5.Why did ff say there were clues “sprinkled” throughout the book but they weren’t deliberately placed to aid the seeker?
To answer these questions, I wanted to approach my next solve by simply sticking to the notion that all you needed was the book, the poem, a map, and an extensive knowledge of Geography. That’s it. Nothing else. I began this solve by taking Fenn’s advice and re-reading “My War For Me.” I went back to this chapter and tried to focus on what he was saying. I tried to find something that would punch me in the face. I tried to put myself in his shoes, and when I did, something stood out to me. After all of the narrow misses, the war, getting shot down, finding the soldiers grave site, what would I look forward to most? If it was me? I would look forward to nothing more than coming home to my family. Being done with it all and in the arms of the people I love the most. That day was December 22nd for him, and when he walked into his home it was Christmas Eve. This is what hit me in the face…the punch so to speak. “So what?” you might be asking. Well, let me explain as to why this was important to me.

 

This goes deep into question #3 & #4 above. Why would it have to be one of the “smart” ones? Why would the time he found the location be too revealing? I was wondering if there was place in the book he specifically mentions an age. I knew of one for sure, but I wanted to go back to the chapter it was in and read what was being said. This chapter in TTOTC is “Looking for Lewis & Clark.” Fenn states “I was thrilled and wished I could have been part of those great adventures. Sixteen-year-old kids are like that I guess.” Could this be the age he was when he found the spot? A specific age that would be too revealing? It was also in this chapter where question #3 came right back around to slap me in the face. On page 63, ff states “ A few days later with the luxury of hot chocolate, I made some notes that might be helpful to any future “SIXTEEN-YEAR-OLD GENIUSES” who think looking for Lewis and Clark might be fun. “One of the smart ones,” “Sixteen-year-old geniuses.” There is no way this was a coincidence in my mind. It is because of this chapter I believe the “map” you need to have is very specific. The map you need is a map of the Gallatin National Forest. A map that will “come in handy later on.”

 

From here I went on a google search for a Gallatin National Forest map from the late 1800s-1940s. A map he might have used. It was then I found this map:
image1
When I found this map, my jaw dropped. Could he really have laid everything out for us? Is this the idea he said to his recollection no one has come up with for the possible solution? With this solve, the clues in the book tell you about the location, tell you about a specific time period, but they are separate from the poem. The poem is to guide you from a directional standpoint. The sprinkled clues are literally there to tell you about where you need to be once you follow the poem…IMO. He stated you could find the location by the clues in the book if you could “recognize them.” I also believe this is why he wanted the cover of TFTW to be very specific. I think the cover of OUAW tells something very specific as well.

 

Let me start with the Poem and bring everything full circle so it makes sense to everyone. Now for the explanation:
Begin It Where Warm Waters Halt: Madison Junction

 

Take it in the canyon down: Madison Canyon

 

NFBTFTW: The 10 river miles where he put the rubber dinghy into the Madison River and fished “downstream” towards Baker’s Hole.

 

PIBTHOB: I believe the home of Brown is Bakers Hole. But, we don’t put in there. We put in BELOW the home of Brown. This would be Barns Hole.

 

From there it’s no place for the meek: The meek will inherit the earth, so we are talking about water.

 

The end is ever drawing nigh: FF has stated if you follow the clues and can’t find it, go back to the beginning. I believe this is the meaning of Nigh (One definition states: Draw the covers nigh towards you). Pulling them up towards you before you go to sleep, so we are going back towards the beginning. Back towards Madison Junction.

 

No paddle up your creek: There will be no paddle because we are walking, and you are not allowed to have a boat/rubber dinghy in this section of river.

 

Just Heavy Loads and Water High: FF stated he liked to fish in the bends of the Madison where the water turned green and deep. He also stated he could throw a bike into water high. This is where we start to bring the clues from the book into the solve. Heading up stream from Barns Hole you meet an area considered “Riverside.” This is one area where stagecoaches use to bring people down to the water. Due to this, and the deep water in the bends of the Madison, this was my “heavy loads and waters high.”

 

If you’ve been wise and found the blaze: I believe what we are supposed to be looking for is some kind of “Star.” On a rock, on a tree, something. My reason for thinking this is because of the 3 Wise Men (More on that in a little). Also, because of the cover of OUAW. I thought he was telling us what we are fishing for is a STAR.

 

Now that we are here at this location, let me explain as to why I believe the clues in the book tell us about a specific time, a STAR, and the location.

 

Clue 1: Green Olives
Clue 2: All the references to the color Green
Clue 3: All the references to the color Red
Clue 4: In the chapter Gypsy Magic he stated the Gypsies came through town several times a year
Clue 5: All the references to food and baking
Clue 6: All the references to fire
Clue 7: The references to dancing (gypsies and fairies)
Clue 8: The darkness behind the gypsies dancing
Clue 9: The darkness of him in the cemetery looking up
Clue 10: Page 146 in TTOTC shows a man with an ax, standing with his foot on a stump around cut down trees. Darkness around him. Looking up towards a bird that looks like a dove, and behind it the head of a turtle (More on this in a minute).

 

I think these clues are telling us about a specific time. I then believe he created the cover of TFTW for the same reason, as well as the cover of OUAW. This brings in some of his scrapbooks as well. The Cloves (Scrapbook 49) His Peppermint and Spearmint plants in his yard (Scrapbook 146).  Imagination is more important than knowledge quote.

 

“Come on already!” you’re probably saying. There are some people speculating throughout the blogs that we need to be at a specific place, at a specific time, to see a shadow cast across something. I believe a specific time is correct, but not for that reason.
I believe, he is referring to the Winter Solstice and Christmas Time. The time he left the war was on December 22nd. He walked into his house on Christmas Eve and for the next month “the flourish of activities related to homecoming and reuniting with family and friends put my jungle thoughts on hold.

 

1.Green Olives and Green Olive Wreaths are associated with Christmas
2.Imagination is more important than knowledge (Kids have the most imagination around Christmas time).
3.Green and Red are the colors of Christmas
4.Gypsies celebrate the summer solstice and the winter solstice. They celebrate with fire and dancing just like in the book when they came to down several times a year.
5.The winter solstice is known for: celebrations of festivals, spending time with loved ones, feasting, singing, dancing and fires. It more often than not falls on the 21st or the 22nd of December
6.The bird with the turtle head behind it I considered to be a reference to “Turtle Dove.”
7.The dark night sky in the pictures: The winter solstice is the time when the day is the shortest and when your shadow is the longest (Back to the cover of TFTW (Cast a lonesome shadow across the Madison)
8.In TTOTC he talked about being in the middle: The winter solstice is also referred to as “Midwinter.”
9.The moon during the winter solstice is called the “Cold Moon.” Effort will be worth the cold.
10. Cloves are considered the Christmas Spice
11. Peppermint and Spearmint are candy cane flavors
12. I believe the Blaze is a star due to the three wise men following the north star to baby Jesus when he was born on Christmas. Also, why the stick figure is hooked on a star on the cover of OUAW.

 

This brings back the map above and “Christmas Tree Park.” Christmas Tree Park is entered right across the street from the Dude Motel. Referred to now as “Riverside Trail.” It takes you down to a gated off area that, if you go beyond the gate, leads you down to the area considered “Riverside.” You can also get there from Barns Hole, but the walk is a lot longer walking upstream.

image2aimage3

image4

This is what it looks like today

image5

The Entrance to the trail

image6
image7
I hiked around here for a good 4 hours. I did a total of around 9.4 miles and took some amazing pictures. I kept and eye out for grizzly bears while trying to find anything that resembled a STAR and came up empty. The only thing I fo und I considered “Interesting” was this:
image8
I didn’t want to mess with it because I didn’t feel comfortable doing so. There were rocks all around it, and my gut instinct was to leave it intact. It wasn’t a STAR so I left it alone. I came up empty handed, but the scenery and the sounds of the Madison River are something I will never forget. I still believe my theory make sense, but if it wasn’t for this theory, I would not have been able to see this amazing place. I hope you enjoy them as much as I did:
image9
image10
image11

Heading towards Earthquake Lake once my searching was complete

image12

Horses near Red Canyon Rd. I wanted to check that road out due to FF stating they made their way up Red Canyon. Maybe on my next trip I’ll make the hike at the end of the road.

image13

This was around one of the deep bends of the Madison River, the guy was fishing into water that looked to be at least 15 feet deep.

image14

Another area between Barns Hole and Bakers Hole

image15

The Madison River before sunrise

-James Collier

 

 

 

 

Cabin Creek…

cabibcrOctober 2019

By A&M

 

Cabin Creek Solve

As I have gone over many of the reasons for this solve in the related “Beaver Creek Solve”.  Please click HERE and read that one first.

We got up early on that Wednesday morning in order to solve this thing, find the gold and still be able to make it to Canyon Village in Yellowstone to see the waterfalls before heading home Thursday morning.  We started with breakfast at the Campfire Lodge Resort.  It is a campground located at the confluence of Cabin Creek and the Madison River.  The breakfast was only bested by the view while eating.and they have a fly shop if you want to go catch something else to eat.  Our waitress told us that there were two momma bears on Beaver Creek and Cabin Creek one with a cub and one with twins.  We figured one down one to go.  On the way out, this old stove caught my eye and I knew it would be a good day.

BlazeKing

The day before, after the Beaver Creek solve, we had gone to the earthquake visitor’s center and learned about the devastation and the science of that dreadful night almost exactly 50 years prior.  One of the things that visually interested me was the scarp.  I had never heard the word but a scarp is the actual place where the plates of the earth slip and is raised or depressed depending on your perspective I suppose.  The ranger at the center told us that the scarp at Cabin creek was so vertical that it took one of the benches from a picnic table up while leaving the table and other bench in place at the bottom of the scarp.  The picnic table was no longer there but the photos told the stories of this place and many others in the Hebgen area.  We went to check it out.  That is me on the top of the scarp.

Scarp

From there, we walked into a small glade just north of the scarp area and down to Cabin Creek.  We saw this friendly otter having her own breakfast.

Otter

Getting back in the car, we drove to the other side of the creek and began our hike up the creek.  About a quarter mile up the trail, you see a manmade dam.  It was built to keep fish habitats from intermingling or some such thing.  Anyhow, it is made of concrete and I can only imagine the amount of work that went into getting those materials up to that point in the creek.  Maybe I think about these things too much but I’m always amazed at the amount of work we humans do for the “good” just to be lazy and let the “bad” happen the same.

The hike up Cabin Creek Trail is beautiful  at least the first 45 minutes is.  Sheer cliffs of rocks mixed with trees and sloped meadows abound.  After the 45 minutes, there is a turn into the woods that is seemingly uphill both ways with lots of roots to trip on.  This is bear country so if you are hiking alone, find a pet rock and keep conversation with it…Loud conversaion.  This is no place for the meek. 

Our solve was to follow this trail until we got to the crossing at Cub Creek at which time we would follow the trailless Cub Creek upstream to Indulgence.  When we got to Cub, we began crossing the creek back and forth on the rocks available.  We came across one bend and saw a large embankment of red.  This was the closest thing we had seen to a blaze so we checked it out thoroughly.

RedBank

We even checked holes where it seemed like someone had set up some rocks but it was only mother nature smiling.

RedHole

upstream a little bit further, we came across a small pool area that had paw markings and some fur caught on logs and branches.  

BearBathtub

further yet, there was a small waterfall that went into a deep pool.  I took a stick and jabbed it down into the hole.  Right in the center, it made a hollow sounding thud whereas all around the sound or the stick hitting rock was solid.  I’m not one to think that Indulgence is at, near, or under a waterfall so I wrote it off as whatever.  But then I started thinking about it and I knew that I had to make sure so that I could sleep at night.  So I removed my clothing and went into the frigid water.  I was not mistaken that there was a reason for the hollow sound.  Somehow a flat piece of shale or fieldstone was resting on top of other stones making the four walls and a roof.  While climbing out of the small pool in the buff, I realized that a thin layer of clothing makes one a lot more confident in the wild than perhaps it should.  I hastily put on my coat of armour and with the dignity it provided, we decided to head back.  It was at this moment (again) that I found the remains of another creature.  I do not venture to guess what beast this once belonged but I will leave the picture for you to judge for yourself.

Bone

So listen all and listen well we did not find what Forrest hid.  However, by going on this adventure with the love of my life, I have treasure abundant.  If either of these stories helps you find the treasure, good for you.  I don’t know that we will go out searching again for this particular thing as there is so much adventure in this world, it seems a shame to dwell in one place too long but then again as we are all different, so are our goals and ambitions.  

Good Luck to All,

A&M

If you have any questions or comments, please ask away but know that a speedy response isn’t a guarantee.