My Favorite Thing Contest…CLOSED TO NEW ENTRIES

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Share Your Favorite Thing With The Blog

Take a photo of it and write a caption in 20 words or less that explains what it is.

Your favorite thing must not be alive..
No pets or children or spouses or plants…nothing alive…

Submit your photo and caption along with your blog name via email to me at:
dal at lummifilm dot com

Send it before Noon, Santa Fe time on Friday April 3rd.
I will post the photos and captions as they arrive for all to admire.
Please enter only once.

There might be a prize if someone submits something really exceptional.
I dunno what the prize might be yet…

 

Here is an example:

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Napoleonic era, infantry (ynfanteria) uniform button recovered off the wreck of the Spanish troop ship Salvador.           – dal

OK…Let’s have some fun!!! What’s your favorite thing?

Click below to see the entries

 

 

THIS CONTEST IS NOW CLOSED TO NEW ENTRIES

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The Fox and Hounds…

March 2020
by Muset

 

Here is an exercise for anybody who wants to play with anagrams.  The original poem line is “begin it where warm waters halt.”  Try and find an anagram for that line, given the context of the following story.  Don’t worry about punctuation.  If you get it correct, I think you may also learn the key word.

Back in 2018 I took vacation to London to see some of the many museums that I hadn’t yet visited.  One of those places was the Imperial War Museum and they had a special area reserved for displaying the medals and short biographies of many of the Victoria Cross medal recipients.

Philip Neame was born 12 December, 1888 in southeast England when Jack the Ripper was terrorizing east London .

Neame joined the Royal Engineers in 1908 and found himself in the French trenches during WWI.  He set about improvising hand grenades from jam jars, scrap metal and gun cotton.  

He received the Victoria Cross, among other honours, for single-handedly fending off a German counter-attack with field-improvised grenades in 1914.  

He won an Olympic gold medal in 1924 for a sharp-shooting-on-the-move event called the Running Deer.  The Olympic medal was not in the display cabinet but there were seventeen other medals in addition to the Victoria Cross packed in there.

In February of 1940, Philip was posted to Egypt and Trans-Jordan as a high-ranking division commander.  The Suez Canal was a very strategic British asset, being the main trade route to its imperial possession India.  The Red Sea is tropical but the Mediterranean is several degrees colder.

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There are military bases are along the canal.

Things were going well for the Allies in North Africa until Marshal Erwin Rommel, the “Desert Fox,” arrived at Tripoli, Libya, in February of 1941 with two tank divisions.

Unfortunately for Philip, he was one of three generals among thousands of his men in the armoured division and Australian division all captured in Libya by Rommel’s Deutsches Afrika Korps (DAK) in April, 1941.  The actual German commander who captured them was Gerhard von Schwerin.  The other two captured generals were John Combe and Richard O’Connor.

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https://www.o5m6.de/wehrmacht/max.php

The three captured British generals were each in their several armoured command vehicle, the AEC (Associated Equipment Company) “Dorchester,” nicknamed after the famous Dorchester Hotel in London because they were so capacious and comfortable.  Marshal Rommel liked those vehicles so much he used them for himself and his own staff.  The Germans renamed those armoured beasts DAK “Mammoth”.  The fox was dressed like the hound.

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A Dorchester/Mammoth over-painted with the German cross.

 Incarcerated in Italy near Florence, the British generals spent seven months constructing an escape tunnel along with their new prison friends Brigadiers James Hargest and Reginald Miles of New Zealand, and Sir Adrian Carton de Wiart, who also had a Victoria Cross medal from action in 1916 France.

The two New Zealanders made it safely to Switzerland, but the four Britons were all recaptured within a fortnight and reunited in their prison at Castello di Vincigliata near Florence with a month-long solitary penalty.

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Castello di Vincigliata– Gaoler to the rich and famous.

Erwin Rommel’s final North African offensive had failed only a few weeks earlier in March, 1943, even with the addition of new Tiger tanks of the 501 Panzer Division joining in November, 1942.  Rommel was reassigned to Greece and then France.

Incredibly in August, 1943, Sir Adrian Carton de Wiart was escorted from prison to Rome on the orders of the Italian King and Prime Minister to be the messenger to Britain concerning Italy’s desire for an armistice with the Allies. 

The September 3, 1943 Italian Armistice lead to Neame’s release into the Nazi-held countryside with companions Combe, O’Connor and Marshal Owen Boyd.  They made their way just over a hundred miles to the coast near Rimini.  Combe joined the local Libero partisans while the rest hired a boat making it to Allied-occupied territory at Termoli in December, 1943.  

Combe made it back to Britain in May, 1944.  That same month Erwin Rommel joined the resistance against Hitler, which failed in July and sealed his fate.  He accepted the offer of suicide to spare his family.

Sadly, Marshal Boyd died from a heart attack in August, 1944, at least at home in London.

Gerhard von Schwerin went on to survive Stalingrad with great honours and then Aachen with heroism by trying to spare the civilians and architecture of that immensely important historic town.  He was later captured in Italy by the British forces in April, 1945 and released two years later after the war.

Philip Neame was appointed Lieutenant Governor of Guernsey in August 1945 and knighted in 1946, among many other honours.

Nobody knows what happened to the three DAK Mammoths but they were probably abandoned somewhere out in the Sahara Desert, broke down and no fuel.

-by Muset

 

 

 

 

Poetry Page XIX…

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The chase certainly has inspired some great poetry…

Here is page xix for poetry about the chase, Forrest or any other Thrill of the Chase related topic. I am hoping poets will create new poetry and place it on this page.

If you would like to peruse the  verse on the first page of poetry click HERE.

Second page is HERE

Third page is HERE

Fourth page is HERE

Fifth Page is HERE

Sixth Page is HERE

Seventh Page is HERE

Eighth Page is HERE

Ninth Page is HERE

Tenth Page is HERE

Eleventh Page is HERE

Twelfth Page is HERE

Thirteenth Page is HERE

Fourteenth Page is HERE

Fifteenth Page is HERE

Sixteenth Page is HERE

Seventeenth Page is HERE

Eighteenth Page is HERE

Thanks

dal…

Feather Art…

March 2020
by dal

 

cake 1Those of us that attended Fennboree 2019 will remember Patty (Patricia Marin Miranda) and her lovely (and delicious) Treasure Chest Cake.

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Patty and Forrest with “THE” cake at Fenboree 2019

It turns out that Patty is accomplished at more than one art form. In addition to being a talented cake artist she is also an artist working in the traditional form of feather painting as practiced in her native country, Costa Rica.

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The Taos Pueblo as painted on feathers by Patty.

Patty playfully calls herself the “Lead Costa Rican Searcher”, and along with her S.O. Paul, they have been on the chase for Forrest’s chest for a couple of years now. They decided to move to Santa Fe after searching in NM, being drawn to the creative and spiritual atmosphere and then visiting on their trek to Fennboree 2019.

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But the newest event in their life is the opening of a small gallery and studio called “Marin” on Canyon Rd. in Santa Fe where Patty creates and shows her beautiful feather art.

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Patty is having the Grand Opening and Exhibition of her gallery on March 27th. Pretty exciting. Congratulations and Good Luck Patty!!!

The chase has spawned another great human story.

You can find out more about Patty and her art and the fascinating history behind feather painting on her gallery website HERE.

I can’t speak for you but I know the next time I am in Santa Fe I plan to stop by and say hi to Patty and Paul and take a closer look at her feather art and maybe talk a bit about “treasure hunting”.

By the way, you can look at more photos from Fennboree 2019 HERE.

-dal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Chroma…

March 2020

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Ansley was introduced to the Chase while desperately ill. Seeking the treasure helped give her a desire to live, The chase gave Ansley energy and enthusiasm and enabled her to fight for her life. She had about given up. Forrest’s story inspired her and she felt deeply connected to his tale. She went on countless BOTG trips.

Because he inspired creativity, she decided to write a story. Forrest, when Ansley asked him for advice, said “ well, finish it! “  So, she did. It is a wild ride and a fanciful interpretation of the hunt. Though Ansley used his name, Forrest approves of the story and actually really enjoyed it.

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The Chroma is available through Amazon Books:
https://www.amazon.com/Chroma-Ansley-Ray/dp/0692362487

 

 

 

 

Speaking of Safety while Searching…

Submitted February 22nd, 2020
by dal

 

I can tell it’s close to spring because I am getting questions from searchers about bears in their search area…and what precautions to take to be safe…

Most of those concerns are about the Yellowstone/Teton area or about the Glacier area.

Since 1979, Yellowstone has hosted over 118 million visits. During this time, 44 people were injured by grizzly bears in the park. For all park visitors combined, the chances of being injured by a grizzly bear are approximately 1 in 2.7 million visits.

That all sounds pretty good unless you are the one in 2.7 million visits…and your chances of being that one person are exactly as good as everyone else’s chance….

However, you can take some precautions to minimize your likelihood of being the one…

I believe the best precaution is to be sensible about where and when you search. It seems unlikely that Forrest, who planned this chase for families and whose intent it was to get kids outside and having fun in the outdoors, would hide the chest in any kind of “dangerous” location…including a known grizzly bear riddled location.

Next, if grizzly bears are known to inhabit the area you are headed into, check with the rangers the day before, or the morning before you search. Ask if there have been any grizzly bear sightings in the area. They will warn you if there have been sightings…then you should reevaluate your plans…

Finally, before you head into any area where bears or lions frequent, make sure you don’t search alone. Make noise while you hike and carry bear spray.

Speaking of bear spray…make sure you know how to use it…
Bear spray is pretty useless tucked away in your pack and not a lot more useful if you have not practiced with it. You need to have armed the can and pressed the trigger once to see how it works before you need it. Then, unarm the can and keep it handy when you hike.

A very bad time to be reading the instructions is when you need to spray a bear…

But safety in the mountains…even in our national parks should be of concern to any searcher. Here are some statistics to get you thinking about safety..

Every year, more than 318 million people visit America’s 419 National Park System sites, including designated National Parks, National Lakeshores, National Monuments, National Historic Sites and National Seashores.

An average of six people die each week in the national park system, a figure that includes accidents like drownings, falls, as well as motor vehicle crashes, natural causes such as heart attacks and suicides. Drowning, automobile accidents, falls and suicides are among the top causes of death at national parks.

And the number one cause is automobile accidents. Folks rarely drive fast in national parks…but they do drive distracted. Running off of the road or crossing into oncoming traffic lanes are common problems in national parks…

So be careful out there…deadly encounters with wildlife are rare…but there are many other ways to hurt or kill yourself in the mountains…

The Boy Scouts have it right…”Be Prepared”!

 

 

 

 

Poetry Page XVIII…

green

The chase certainly has inspired some great poetry…

Here is page xvii for poetry about the chase, Forrest or any other Thrill of the Chase related topic. I am hoping poets will create new poetry and place it on this page.

If you would like to peruse the  verse on the first page of poetry click HERE.

Second page is HERE

Third page is HERE

Fourth page is HERE

Fifth Page is HERE

Sixth Page is HERE

Seventh Page is HERE

Eighth Page is HERE

Ninth Page is HERE

Tenth Page is HERE

Eleventh Page is HERE

Twelfth Page is HERE

Thirteenth Page is HERE

Fourteenth Page is HERE

Fifteenth Page is HERE

Sixteenth Page is HERE

Seventeenth Page is HERE

Thanks

dal…

Side Tracked…

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January 2020

by dal

 

One of the reasons I am such a poor search partner is that I am easily distracted. I call it curiosity. Esmerelda calls it a break and my fellow travelers call it a torment.

First of all, I’ve never had a complete solution…not once. The best I can do from home is to come up with five or six clues. Once I had a blaze before I left home…but only once. It came from one of Forrest’s photos published on this very blog in an area that already interested me. It was a good mile walk from the place I could park my vehicle. But it took me five hours to get there because I am curious.

First, I found a colossal beaver lodge on the river and I could hear critters inside (young beavers?) whining and humming. I sat around and waited to see if I could spot a beaver come out. I didn’t.

Then, a few hundred feet later, I ran across a magnificent acre patch of Sulphur Indian Paintbrush. I spent the next hour crawling around on my hands and knees like a ponderous, giant bee, taking pictures…wide shots, tight shots, extreme close-ups. That was a lot of fun!

Around the next bend I ran into an elk cow and her baby out wading in the Madison. Really…they weren’t crossing it. They were just cooling their heels. Walking a bit up stream and then a bit downstream. I christened them Shirley and Christine. I watched them play in the water for half an hour or so and then I had to make a detour around them and head out toward my blaze.

But it gets worse. I found one of those big anthills with gazillions of (nonbiting) ants that I had to investigate. I watched them carry grains of sand from down at the base of their mountain up to the top and into the entrance. Meanwhile other ants were coming out of that egress carrying other grains and piling them up on the hill. Maybe they were redecorating?. So I named each ant and watched them toil away for a half hour before moving on.

I ran into a shallow pebbly area on the stream and I HAD to stop and look for cool rocks. I look for unique colors and shapes. I pick them up and investigate the sand under them for sparkly grains. I tried skipping the flat ones. I marvel at the nearly perfect round ones.

Any meadow I run into lures me like a sailor to a bar. I love those things and I can spend days photographing a single small meadow of wildflowers. I might never come this way again and the camera is my memory.

A few years ago I was exploring the The Dominguez and Escalante Expedition as a potential key to the riddle of the poem. I was driving near Dinosaur National Monument in CO heading to a place where the 1776 expedition camped close to a spring. When I got within reach an oil outfit had been trenching and laying pipe across miles of open Sage Steppe resulting in a mound of diggings along the now buried trench. Since I am wildly entertained by geology I considered this a huge bonus. I started examining that unearthed Colorado rock like it was gold….How often can you examine what’s under your feet so easily? I was looking for fossils. I ended up spending three days out there just turning over rocks.

After three glorious days I ended up with three beautiful keepers…

Eat your heart out!!!

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I split up so much limestone I think I should be an honorary quarryman. The fish happened when I spent the first day splitting up flat limestone slabs. It didn’t look that good when I found her. That represents a few hours of clean-up at home. I call her Dory. Miles later the boulders were gone and I was cracking smaller rocks…the leaf…finally, there was nothing along the trench except broken crumbly pieces…the shell.

After all that I got back to looking into The Dominguez and Escalante Expedition solution.

So, to get back to my beginning thought… a side-track in nature is a hoot for me, I can stay entertained in one spot much after others have, guzzled all the beer, gone mad and left screaming at me. Those with a more focused view of life and the treasure hunt find me downright annoying to search with.

There’s more to the treasure hunt than the 42lb box.

Just sayin!

dal…

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harley…

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January 2020
by dal

 

Before I get back to the story I was scribbling I wanted to share some information I just received.

Our old pal Harley Dodge Dart was found dead by some hunters last fall. He was in his old pick-up on yet another narrow, dirt road in the Montana mountains around the Bitterroot. Foul play was not suspected.

I guess he was found not far from his “ranch”. Of course calling his place a ranch is about like calling Esmerelda a limo.

You might remember Harley from an adventure we shared a few years ago. I wrote about it HERE.

I wonder who will replace him in the library of fascinating old characters that have earned a place in this ancient world?

Semper Fi

Harley Dodge Dart
1929-2019

He died like he lived…alone and peacefulusmc

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Win a Set of Forrest’s Books & Help Cancer Victims…

 

logoThe Cancer Foundation for New Mexico (CFFNM) is a local, independent, non-profit that provides support for cancer patients in northern New Mexico.

The annual Sweetheart Auction is the primary fundraising event supporting essential patient services and programs for the Cancer Foundation for New Mexico.

Auction attendees enjoy the opportunity to bid on over 500 incredible items including local & international getaways, hand-crafted jewelry, highly-collectible artwork, unique dining experiences, and much more.

Last year’s Sweetheart Auction brought in over 850 people and raised approximately 50% of the Foundation’s annual revenue for patient services.

As always, the annual Sweetheart Auction would not be possible without the continued support of the Santa Fe community and beyond.

And this is where we come in…Searchers for Forrest’s hidden chest… we can help by bidding on a signed and doodled collection of Forrest’s books…pictured below. These are brand new books all are signed and the top three are doodled..

fenn books

(1) The Thrill of the Chase, signed and doodled, 10th edition
(2) Too Far to Walk, signed and doodled, 8th edition
(3) Once Upon a While, signed and doodled, 1st edition
(4) Seventeen Dollars a Square Inch: A Personal Tribute to Eric Sloane, signed, 1st edition
(5) Teepee Smoke: A New Look Into the Life and Work of Joseph Henry Sharp, signed, 1st edition
(6) Leon Gaspard: The Call of Distant Places, signed, 1st edition

You do not have to come to the Auction to bid on this item. You can bid from the warmth and comfort of your home, no matter where you live and you can do it right now by clicking HERE and filling in the bidding form. You must submit your bid by Friday, Feb. 7th, at 5pm U.S. Mountain Time.

 

You can find out more about the books up for bidding by clicking HERE

If you’d like to know more about the Cancer Foundation for New Mexico…click HERE

If you’d like to know more about their annual auction, click HERE

You can even look at some of the other items that will be offered at the auction HERE